(Closed) “No kids allowed” movement

posted 9 years ago in Parenting
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  • Post # 122
    Member
    1312 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: June 2013

    I have made it a priority to raise my child to know how to behave in public and have always been complimented with what a great job we have done raising him. I hate that not all parents have that same vision with their children and just let them run wild. I can definitely see how certain businesses have had enough with the wild children, it’s just too bad that all parent/kids have to suffer because of it. I have no problem with getting a babysitter when I go to nicer places, I think our son would rather stay home and watch movies and eat pizza with his favorite sitter anyway! I agree with a PP that discipline has become less and less and that is the root of the problem.

    Post # 123
    Member
    1058 posts
    Bumble bee

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    @Mrs.KMM: I go out to really nice restaurants too, and I rarely even notice the patrons at the next table. Maybe you are more easily annoyed than me and that may be, but I will take an annoying adult over a screaming child any day.

    Post # 124
    Member
    2495 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: January 1991

    I think if restaurants/theatres etc want to impose those policies then they should be free to do so, but they shouldn’t be MADE to do so.  If you agree with it, go to those places.  If you disagree, go somewhere else. 

    It’s just that easy.

    Post # 125
    Member
    1684 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: August 2013

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    @Talishazwi:

    That’s fantastic. I lolled.

    Post # 126
    Member
    7775 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper

    I have, personally, never had a problem in a very fancy restaurant. I can’t say that I’ve ever really noticed children but I’m sure that it does happen. I think it’s arrogant to assume that because you have never personally seen a child in a really nice restaurant, that it can’t possibly ever happen. Seriously?

    I think the main issue in parenting today is parents, like many of you. Parents don’t teach kids respect and discipline. Kids don’t have boundaries anymore. I’m speaking generally here, because I do know people who do raise their children right. I also think that parents have this extreme sense of entitlement. THEIR child is a speshul snowflake and should be allowed to do absolutely anything they want, go anywhere they want and have anything they want. That’s bullshit.

    I do think that some places should be allowed to be child-free. Fancy restaurants, movies after a certain time, airplanes (this, in terms of allowing SOME flights to be child-free. Give people the option to pay a bit more for a child-free flight. Some airlines already do this.) BUT I think that places where you would normally expect to see children, like supermarkets, family-friendly movies, family restaurants, etc, it’s ridiculous to try and ban children.

    I do also think that staff in places should be allowed to request that parents take a screaming devil child outside. You inconvenience everyone else? We get to inconvenience you.

    Post # 127
    Member
    1312 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: June 2013

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    @CorgiTales: I agree about the R rated movie thing. I feel like when I chose to have a child, I made the choice that I was going to have to miss out on doing things (like going to certain moives, restaraunts, etc) if I didn’t have a baby-sitter.

    Post # 128
    Member
    289 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: October 2011

    I use to be the one at the restaurant that hated to hear a crying baby. Now, that crying baby is mine. He may not be crying, just talking, but it is still loud and can annoy people who don’t think it’s quite as adorable as my FH and I. So, when we go to movies (especially IMPORTANT ones like Harry Potter lol) we leave the baby at home. Our baby will be at our wedding, but no one else under 13 is allowed. Our wedding will have an open bar and it will be an adult environment. As for restaurants and grocery stores, that is a little extreme. 

    Post # 129
    Member
    437 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: October 2012

    I think there’s nothing wrong with this… and I have a child of my own.

    I understand that it’s hard to keep a screaming baby calm — or to reign in a rambunctious toddler. But it irritates me to no end when I have to listen to it.

    There are adult-only things everywhere… bars/clubs, golf courses and the like. To add restaurants and special movie-screenings to this is fantastic. But that’s just my humble opinion.

    Post # 130
    Member
    14492 posts
    Honey Beekeeper
    • Wedding: June 2011

    @CorgiTales – Exactly! I used to work in an upscale restaurant. We had expectations out of our customers, if children acted up or were running around, the manager would ask them to leave. We had many more people thank us than ever boycotted us for that. Plus, I made a ton more money.

    Post # 131
    Member
    11324 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: February 2011

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    @TheMrs2013:

    I feel like when I chose to have a child, I made the choice that I was going to have to miss out on doing things (like going to certain moives, restaraunts, etc) if I didn’t have a baby-sitter.

     

    Exactly. This is all I’m saying. It’s a sacrifice. One of many. I don’t understand people who think that a child is like a purse that can just get toted around anywhere you went before you had kids. It is not always appropriate. 

    Post # 132
    Member
    507 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: June 2011

    Maybe it’s just me, but the “I paid X amount of money to have a nice dinner/quiet flight/whatever else” argument sounds as selfishly entitled as the parents/children who are getting blasted by the pro-child restriction group. Those parents paid just as much as you, and I can guarantee you that their goal is to have a nice dinner/quiet flight/whatever else also…NOT to annoy you. You can’t say that someone else is acting entitled and/or selfishly by bringing a young child to a restaurant and then say that young children should not be allowed to that restaurant at all…that makes you equally selfish.

    The sweeping substitution of the word “brat” for “child” (as in “Brat bans,” from the original article, or even throughout the arguments on here) is gross. Children misbehave, often because it’s how they learn boundaries and acceptable behavior, but an episode of misbehaving does not mean the child is a brat. Yes, there are brats in the world, and they grow up to be bitches and assholes, regardless of how they were parented. But don’t relabel children as a whole with the term brat.

    Adult-only resorts: I’ve got no issues with them, I get it, I’ve been to them, they can be very nice (and I’ve found that just because there aren’t children doesn’t mean there aren’t obnoxious people.) But I’m fundamentally opposed to banning children from first class or specific flights on commercial airlines. Flying commercially is basically public transportation: If you can afford to purchase a ticket, you have the right to fly, as long as you are not violating federal aviation laws. I’ve flown first class and it’s not like you are completely isolated from coach; you can still hear kids in the back. And–gasp! The horror!–I’ve flown in first class with my son, when he was an infant. (He slept the entire flight.) Don’t like the sound of other people? How about a pair of headphones? If you can’t deal with being around all types of humanity, charter a private flight.
    Young children should not be allowed in R-rated movies because the content is not appropriate, NOT because their crying might irritate you.
    I take my children with me just about everywhere, because 1) excellent manners/behavior in public requires practice and 2) as a previously single mom, I really didn’t have a choice. So at this point, my kids are pros at airline travel, hotels, restaurants, doctor’s offices, grocery stores, being at the office with us, etc. Next on our list is to start taking them to music performances. (My kids are 8 and 5, by the way.) Are they perfect? Hell no! Neither am I. I’ve done the looooong walk from the back of the store out to our car with a screaming toddler under my arm PLENTY. I expect excellent behavior and manners from my kiddos and I have no desire for my children to pitch a fit in public…but that’s because I expect the best of them, not because I’m worried about what someone else thinks.
    All this coming from a woman who admittedly does not consider herself to be particularly patient with children! I love my children but not anyone else’s, if I’m honest. But the notion that it would be OK ban them outright really gets under my skin.

    Post # 133
    Member
    13094 posts
    Honey Beekeeper
    • Wedding: July 2010

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    @muckmoo1: I’m actually really well able to let things roll off my back so I wouldn’t say I’m easily annoyed at all.  But I am much more bothered by a misbehaving adult than a child because they have no excuse and should know better while I can recognize that the misbehaving child is the result of poor parenting/dicipline.

    Post # 134
    Member
    1312 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: June 2013

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    @CorgiTales: I just imagined added handles to my son and carrying him around while I went shopping, out to eat, etc. I don’t think he would appreciate it!

    Post # 135
    Member
    1312 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: June 2013

    @Mrs.KMM: It’s been running sooooo slow for me when I post.

    Post # 136
    Member
    4885 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: May 2012

    WB is a pain.  I thought switching to IB was going to help!  Sigh.

    The topic ‘“No kids allowed” movement’ is closed to new replies.

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