(Closed) Non-high energy dog breeds?

posted 9 years ago in Pets
Post # 77
Member
659 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: March 2011

Finding a building with zero pet restrictions with regard to size and breed was my #1 priority.  It is hard, but renting from an individual person is easier.  We’re thinking of renting our condo when we are ready to move, and our restriction will be no cats (they smell) and only 1 dog. 

So I’m happy to rent to you when I move no matter what size dog you have:)

Post # 78
Member
5 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: August 2010

ST. BERNARD! Our Bernard is the biggest, sweetest, but most important, LAZIEST dog you have ever met. Even when we are home, all she wants to do is lay around (albeit right on top of us if she could πŸ™‚ ). They have beautiful dispositions and are wonderful with small dogs and children, etc. as well. Good luck!

Post # 79
Member
1227 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

I’ve also heard pugs and french bulldogs are pretty low energy, like the couch potatoes of dogs. But I don’t know how well they do without a lot of human interaction (snuggling, petting, etc.) for long periods of time.

Post # 80
Member
389 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I’ve heard that Basset Hounds are incredibly lazy.  And they’re super cute! 

Post # 81
Member
4753 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

Would you ever consider adopting and older dog from the pound. We picked up our little weiner dog from the pound. He’s quite a bit older but you don’t have to go AS old… (our pup is 13yrs old). Cute as can be and a total cuddler, doesn’t have much energy and pretty much just cuddles and sleeps his day away.

Post # 82
Member
2007 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

@cbee:  My old dog was a Ridgeback mix and I LOVED his energy level!  He was perfectly happy to laze around all day and then when I was ready to go it was on!  He was even really good about waiting if he asked to go out but I couldn’t right then he’d go lay down again until I was ready to leave.  They’re not a common breed so I describe them as a greyhound/mastiff cross.  As hard as that is to picture it sums them up pretty well!  

@ddw:  Like others have said, don’t discount the big breeds just yet!  They have that much more mass to haul around and that takes WORK!  There are exceptions of course (like huskies and labs) but a lot of giant breeds tend to be quite lazy around the house.  Also, don’t forget that there are always exceptions to the breed.  It’s totally possible to find a mellow Jack Russell or a hyper Basset!  That said, Greyhounds are notorious for being lazy around the house!  Actually, I think most hounds are but do be mindful of potential noise with the scent hounds.  You best bet is probably to get an older dog, over 2-5 years depending.  That way you’ll know what you’re getting into.  πŸ˜‰

Post # 83
Member
7770 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

@ddw:  I wanted to pipe in again and just remind you that the larger the dog, sometimes the shorter the lifespan.  (That is one reason I shy away from Danes- some only live 10 years πŸ™  )  If you do want a smaller dog, maybe an Italian Greyhound?  There are rescures and they have adorable personalities and will make it easier to rent (I think the get up to 15 pounds, but are tall and skinny).  I want one!  Sorry everyone is chewing you out about the kennel.  People just like to do that πŸ™‚  My dog is fine around the house, she just wrecked her fair share of things as a puppy and learned.  She can hold herself for up to 12 hours (if I am sick or something).  She does have her own room though (the laundry room, it is like a kennel for her and she loves it- her own space with a dog bed)- and when she is naughty I tell her “go to your room!”  It’s pretty cute.

caitlanc  I love Ridgebacks!  We had one at our kennel and he just slept on the couch while the hyper dogs ran around.  He was so gorgeous he was like having a boyfriend πŸ™‚  He seemed like such a great inside dog.  My German Shorthair is like that- sleeps and nothing else all day, but will run like the wind when we get outside.  She is really good about waiting until I am ready to go out too.

 

Post # 84
Member
2007 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

@cbee:  Ooh!  Italian greyhound!  I didn’t think of that.  I haven’t known any personally but if they’re anything like the big guys they could be a good fit.  I agree that renting with a big dog can be a royal PITA.  

And all dogs are different of course but it got really cold here not too long ago and I had to force our pit bull to go out twice a day.  He was quite certain he could hold it, thankyouverymuch!  He has gone I think 11 or 12 hours before.  I don’t like to do it to him but he’s not bothered by it.

Post # 85
Member
322 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

@jindc:  Yay!!! Another XL dog lover that can say that the bigger dogs don’t necessarily mean more work!  

I have a great dane, and the only time he really gets up from his spot is when it’s time to go for a car ride or a walk.  Other than that, he’s perfectly content on his bed, or laying right next to us.  Yes, they’re big, but they don’t take up much space at all. 

Post # 86
Member
57 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

Another vote for retired racing greyhounds!! I own a big 85lb boy and I also volunteer for Fast Friends greyhound rescue here in SoCal. Retired racers make AMAZING apartment dogs. They sleep anywhere from 12-18 hours a day and are perfectly content in small spaces due to their previous life of being crated at the track.

They’re huge sweethearts and love to be loved on. Some of the big pros of adopting a retired racer:

  • Already potty trained, spayed/neutered and each dog is matched with it’s new owner based on personality and compatability 
  • Very few health problems; no hip displaysia and a life expectancy of 12-14 years
  • 95% of greyhounds rarely ever bark. In the three years I’ve had Arrow, I think I’ve heard him bark 8 times.
  • Because there are so many greyhounds out there, you have a wide variety of colors, sizes and personalities to choose from.

I currently live in a 650 square foot apartment and Arrow does just fine. Even when he stays at my FMIL’s house, he’d rather be inside sleeping than in the backyard. However be warned: greyhounds are like potato chips. It’s hard to get just one πŸ™‚

Post # 87
Member
502 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

We have a puggle and a pug. Both love to play, but in short spurts and right when they wake up in the morning and whenever we are winding down at night. Aside from that they sleep. Literally, they will take a nap for hours even if I am home to hang out with lol. Its cute because they put themselves in bed. They like to go to the dog park and stuff, but not so much the walking part, well at least the pug. Our puggle is a little more active due to the beagle part of her. They just like to go and socalize.

Post # 88
Member
181 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

We have a Golden-doodle (Golden Retreiver/Poodle Mix) and she is incredibly lazy. A lot of mornings before I leave for work I have to make her get out of her bed and go outside to potty. As soon as she comes back in she heads straight to her bed. That being said she is a lot of fun when we want to play, but on nights we just want to watch tv and be lazy she is cool with attempting to be a lap dog. The other great thing about this breed is she is INCREDIBLY intelligent. The poodle half of her gives her brains and the allergy friendly/non-shedding coat. The Golden Retreiver side makes her a lover who has never met a person she doesn’t love. She is the happiest dog I have ever met. We joke that every moment is the “BEST EVER!!!” to her.

Also, as far as crate training goes our trainer (our dog is being trained as a service dog) wouldn’t even consider not crate training her. As a puppy and into her first year or so she would spend between 8-10 hours in her crate while I was at work. Now that she is older she is allowed out most days and just sleeps in her bed while we are gone.

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Post # 89
Member
15 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: March 2011

@meginstl: my lab does the same thing.  He does not want to get up in the morning.  He likes to sleep in till about ten and will avoid being walked.  That said, he does love to go on our walks in the evening.  He is in his mature stage and such a great companion.

Post # 90
Member
440 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I have three dogs at the moment the smallest is 8 lb and the largest is 132 lb. and the in the middle one is 75 lb. Bella the St. Bernard is the most calm and layed back. She would be totally happy to hang out on the sofa or go for runs and walks. I will say this if you have a big dog you HAVE TO TRAIN. Because Bella is as big as a human adult if she wasn’t trained there would be no way to control her. We still have problems with her stealing food off of the counters because her head is eye level with the kitchen counters. This also means she can steal directly from the stove top. She has burned her chin on the stove before too.

Post # 91
Member
68 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

I recommend looking into retired greyhounds.  They’re very low energy and a great choice for people with allergies, and since they’re sensitive to temperature extremes, they’re better off indoors.  During their racing days they spend most of their time in a crate and are taught to relieving themselves outside when taken for a walk.  So, although it probably won’t be necessary and isn’t ideal, they’d probably tolerate the crated lifestyle pretty well if that’s what you need to do in the beginning.

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