Non-hormonal/non-implant birth control options

posted 6 months ago in Wellness
Post # 2
Member
721 posts
Busy bee

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bluebee19 :  Never used a spermacide, but I would recommend reading Taking Charge of Your Fertility! It’s a great book that will tell you everything you need to know about temping and charting, and then you can really truly just use that info for preventing. Otherwise condoms? Then you don’t have to be using any products with chemicals or stuff that you don’t know much about.

Post # 3
Member
443 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2019

The pull-out method gets a lot of hate but when used 100% of the time, especially in conjunction with natural family planning (avoid or using a condom during the most fertile days) it is very effective. We used it for 5 years without any issues, then got pregnant on month 3 of trying. 

Post # 4
Member
3570 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I use an app called natural cycles. It’s licenced for contraception and you can use it to help conception. I used it between my planned pregnancies. We aren’t kind of using it now but not relying on it because I’m still breastfeeding and not sleeping loads. We use condoms as a back up.

Post # 5
Member
8992 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

I’m currently pregnant but thinking about afterwards – I’m unsure if I want an IUD and I’m considering a diaghram. We have infertility but since an oops wouldn’t be welcome we’re not willing to risk rhythm method.

Post # 6
Member
9773 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

Personally I’d do one of the smaller IUDs like the Skyla or Kyleena. Iirc they’re good for 3 years.

I would 100% not rely on spermicide unless you’re okay with getting pregnant sooner.

Post # 9
Member
3570 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

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bluebee19 :  it’s £50 here. But if you’re pregnant you get it for free so that helps.

its pricy especially considering contraceptives are free on the NHS but I really don’t want an implant or to use hormones lol

Post # 10
Member
89 posts
Worker bee

The fertility awareness method (maybe using natural cycles) could be suitable for your needs. ONLY use this method if you have an extremely regular menstrual cycle. ONLY use this method if you don’t mind getting pregnant sooner than you plan. You would have to track both your basal body temperature and your cervical mucus to use this method effectively. 

Spermicide on its own has around a 20% failure rate, so is not recommended for use on its own.

Additionally, I would not recommend the spermicide you named as it contains nonoxinol-9, which can upset the natural bacteria in your vagina (which increases your susceptibility to thrush and Bacterial Vaginosis), can cause vaginal lesions, and has been linked to a higher rate of vaginal and cervical cancer. 

If you want to use spermicide, it is more effective when combined with a diaphragm or cervical cap. Examples of nonoxinol-9 free spermicides are Caya Contraceptive Gel and Contragel Green

The Copper IUD is another option. It has no hormones, and so does not disrupt you natural menstrual cycle. Copper is toxic to eggs and sperm, and creates a foreign body reaction in the uterus, meaning that if an egg manages to get fertilised, it cannot implant in the uterine lining. Depending on the model, they can last 5-10 years, but can be removed at any point and do not affect your natural fertility.

Skyla and Kyleena IUD’s, which a pp mentioned, are not hormone free, but are good low-hormone options.

Lastly, condoms or femidoms are effective options. If your partner is resistnant to using condoms due to reduced sensation, they may prefer femidoms.

It would be a good idea to consult a sexual health specialist (advisor, nurse or doctor) as GP’s tend only to have basic knowledge of the options, as they have to know a little about a lot, and usually give very generic advice when it comes to sexual health, unless they have a specialist qualification for this.

 

Post # 12
Member
1331 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2019 - City, State

Hubby and I love the Marquette Method. Very effective. It uses the clearblue monitor. 

Post # 13
Member
1001 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2019

Here’s the thing…it’s actually harder to get pregnant than we’re led to believe. The window is fairly limited each month. The danger zone is in the time leading up to ovulation, since sperm can survive up to five days. Once you’ve confirmed ovulation, that egg dies pretty quickly and the rest of your cycle is safe.

So, all of that to say, tracking ovulation and using condoms (plus being extra careful during that peak ovulation window) is quite effective. Hell, condoms on their own are very effective when used correctly and consistently. 

Post # 14
Member
3199 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2017

I came off the birth control pill almost 2 years ago (recommended by my doctor after increased risk of stroke), and couldn’t use any form of hormonal birth control. She told me that condoms + spermicide are just as effective as the pill if used correctly. I also started temping and charting right away to really get to know my cycles and when my fertile window was. I would highly recommend the app fertility friend. We never had a pregnancy scare while using these methods and now this month have switched to TTC.  

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bluebee19 :  

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