Not enough work in my role, what to do? Leaving not an option.

posted 3 months ago in Career
  • poll: Next steps
    Bring it up with manager once removed : (4 votes)
    44 %
    Help the other team : (5 votes)
    56 %
  • Post # 2
    Member
    112 posts
    Blushing bee

    What specifically is your job? Why can’t you get another job? This one sounds pretty boring.

    Post # 3
    Member
    5564 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: July 2018

    Weren’t you literally just complaining about how hard you work and how you occasionally have to stay until 6 or 7pm and now you’re saying 80% of the time you actually do nothing? 

    Post # 4
    Member
    3282 posts
    Sugar bee

    I would take some time to observe your new boss and gain an understanding of the situation before you start making waves. After all, you don’t have a great track record of reading between the lines. In the meantime, start putting feelers out and applying for a new job. It does not sound like this one will last long.

    Post # 5
    Member
    2794 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: July 2011

    I suspect you’ll be made redundant soon if you’re that specialist and they don’t need the team any more. Your manager knew that’s where it was going and has jumped ship. Suggest you do the same 

    Post # 6
    Member
    912 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: August 2019 - City, State

    Twizbe :  Interesting point of view. I didn’t think of this. 

    shadows9x :  Hate to say it, but I’m pretty much in this same position. I love the company I work for, but there is not enough for me to fill 40 hours. I just do a majority of the things I’d do at home in the office. I meal plan here, grocery shop online, I have a list of household consumables that I buy online when I’m low (TP, toothpaste, napkins, soap, etc). I do my homework here, plan workouts, and use my lunch break to go for walks & listen to podcasts. If leaving REALLY sin’t an option, and PP is right that you’re in a dying position, I’d make the best of it. 

    Post # 7
    Member
    2236 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: October 2010

    I just can’t imagine why an employer would hire a second full time staffer (at a high salary and not sure how benefits work in Australia, but probably some additional costs there), if there was really only enough work to fill up one business day a week.

     

    That tells me that either 1. your hiring manager incorrectly planned for workflow and staffing, 2. an external factor (say losing a large client, a major shift in consumer needs, technology advancement, etc) significantly decreased your company’s production in the year you were there, or 3. the higher ups have been slowly reducing your specific workload to make for an easier transition when they let you go.

     

    Regardless, and I know this isn’t what you want to hear, but you absolutely, 100%, need to start looking for another job.

     

    Right now, they have two staffers doing the same job, one who has been there for a long time and is well liked and trusted, and one who has been there for a year, who has been reprimanded for coming in late and leaving early, and who has been told she needs to work on her soft skills and being more of a yes person. And who recently went on record saying she has nothing to do 80% of the time. (BTW- I suspect your boss that left told you to look busy and not mention being out of work to do again to protect you, as you were already on his boss’s radar for not performing well). They are not replacing your boss, which I suspect means they plan to downsize your department.

     

    For now, come in early, stay the full day, don’t take long lunches, and if you find yourself at your desk with nothing to do, can you research instead? Look up classes, webinars, market/industry trends- really anything that might be relevant to your job at hand? You can educate yourself on some more subjective training that most people don’t have time to invest in while at work.

    Post # 8
    Member
    2697 posts
    Sugar bee

    What happened to you working all these long hours?!!?

    Anyway, sounds like you’re already on thin ice & being monitored pretty closely. Your old manager told you to never say that again. And now you want to go to another manager?? Be prepared for them to let you go if you do.

    Post # 9
    Member
    948 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: September 2019 - City, State

    zzar45 :  Yes!!! My thoughts to. 

    Post # 10
    Member
    948 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: September 2019 - City, State

    shadows9x :  Honestly I don’t think you will be there much longer given your history. That’s problary why they are not given you much more to do. Read your last post, it should be very clear. I know it was to a lot of us. 

    Post # 11
    Member
    1448 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: City, State

    You’re the bee who constantly came in late and thought it was unfair you couldn’t leave early.

    I have some advice for you. You need to do some SERIOUS introspection. You are all over the place.

    Please, please seek the advice of a therapist. 

    Post # 12
    Member
    5559 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: October 2017

    Given that you were on thin ice when you posted before, about how unfair it was that another coworker can come in late and leave early and you get in trouble when you do it…

    I wonder if they are looking for your replacement and not giving you any tasks?

    Post # 13
    Member
    4498 posts
    Honey bee

    TheMrsTulip :  I don’t think she was constantly late – but late more than once in the first year of employment certainly isn’t a good sign or the sign of a professional anyone would want to keep around.  And she left early more than once without permission and got in trouble for it.  Again…pretty troubling behavior in the first year of employment.  (ETA: And missed an entire week of work due to being upset that her wedding wasn’t perfect.  Man, I envy the amount of vacation and sick leave y’all must get in Australia if within a year of employment you got enough leave to take off for your wedding and presumably honeymoon and a week of crying time besides.)

    She is the one who six months in wanted to be acting manager during their 2-3 week leave (which confuses me even more now when she says her manager barely had enough to work to keep him occupied and she is literally the only employee he supervised).  So there’s very little awareness there…

    And she’s the one who admitted on this board that she is lazy and that’s why she had reservations about taking this job in the first place.

    OP, you may want to work on getting to work on time reliably, staying your full work hours, adjusting your attitude, being a team player and working on those soft skills, and minding your own business instead of being a nosy busybody concerned with other people’s work hours.  If we can pick up on this from what you wrote here -admittedly you may say things here you wouldn’t admit at work – I promise you everyone at work can pick up on it, too.  The actual work you do may be satisfactory, but it’s easy to spot the people with bad attitudes or who give just enough to be satisfactory or who instigate issues in the office.  Satisfactory work doesn’t mean you are liked or trusted to be promoted.  That’s something you earn above and beyond your satisfactory work by being dependable, honest, trustworthy, collaborative, and going above and beyond consistently.  

    Post # 14
    Member
    37 posts
    Newbee

    shadows9x :  I really hate to make an unproductive comment, but you’ve GOT to be kidding me. You want to bring up the fact that you don’t have enough work to your manager once removed – the SAME manager’s manager who has advised your old supervisor that s/he has issues with you consistently being late to work?

    OP, I suggest you reread all of the responses to your last work post (as well as your previous posts). It’s pretty clear that you are underperforming based on your supervisors’ expectations and the culture of the company is a terrible fit for you, regardless of your self-described work ethic (“blasted by management,” “no prospects for the company or my career progressing”).

    I hate to beat a dead horse here, but no one is going to consider you for your manager’s role or progression in any way, shape, or form if you can’t be on time. I suspect part of the reason they are turning down your offers of training and support is because the writing is on the wall. By all means, continue to offer to help out across the company, but if I were you I would definitely be actively looking for a new role. You don’t seem happy at this company, nor they with you.

    Post # 15
    Member
    1448 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: City, State

    annabananabee :  OP said she was “occasionally” late. With how oblivious she seems to be regarding her own actions, I’m guessing she is late more than she realizes.  I stand by constantly.

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