(Closed) Nursing carreer and med school !

posted 5 years ago in College
Post # 4
Member
3244 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

Becoming a nurse first will not necessarily help you become a doctor. In the US people choose one path or the other.

You could look into becoming a pediatric nurse. But for that you will need at least a 4 year Bachelor’s of nursing degree (RN) and then a certificate in pediatric nursing or a Master’s degree.

To become a medical doctor, you will need a 4 year Bachelor’s degree, followed by 4 years of medical school and then 2-6 years as a resident (depending on specialty-a pediatrician is a 3 or 4 year residency-I think).

 

Post # 6
Member
13101 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

@catracha:  I’ve never applied to med school but I don’t think there are any restrictions on what your 4-year bachelor’s degree is in.  You do have to make sure that you take all of the courses that are considered “pre-med” though so if your major doesn’t automatically include those, you’ll have to take them as extra courses.  Pre-med is basically a special track that you take in addition to your major.  You also will have to take the MCAT exam in order to get into med school.

Post # 7
Member
3244 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

@catracha:  For medical school the Bachelor’s degree can be in any major although the majority of students major in either Biology or Biochemistry because those majors include most of the classes required for admission to medical school.

I know you immigrated to the US from another country and English is not your native language. In all honesty-to get into a nursing program or medical school both your English language and writing skills need to be much better than what you have written here. It will be worth your time to take additional classes to strengthen your communication and writing skills.

Post # 10
Member
3244 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

@catracha:  You are welcome. Best of luck with whichever path you choose!

Post # 11
Member
45627 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

Some of the best doctors I know were educated anad worked as Registered Nurses first.

If you need to do things step by step, nursing gives you an amazingly solid background for medicine.

Post # 13
Member
13101 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

@catracha:  I was just about to come back and tell you that you should look at PA programs too.  My SIL is in one now and she loves it!  You still need a 4-year degree first and there are certain specific courses that are required before admission.  But PA school is much shorter than med school/residency and PAs can do many of the same things that MDs can.

Post # 15
Member
5554 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2011

Well, as some one who is FINALLY almost finished with a BSN degree, it is so worth it but I also don’t know many nurses who go on to med school, but there are now programs for masters/doctorate level nurse practicioners who are able to be a primary care provider, but it isn’t quite the same as a doctor (MD). There are several options to work through in nursing, depending on your time, ability to go to school and desire for final outcomes. ETA: Nurse practitioner programs are somewhat similar to PA programs in terms of what they do, PAs just have a “medical” education backround and nurse practioners have a “nursing” education backround.

If you need a job NOW, the working for a time as a nurse aid or patient care tech is a good starting point, and I mean this in the best possible way but nursing school (no matter what level) is already incredibly difficult and if you have still not fully mastered speaking/writting English it will make it even more difficult. Nurse aide/ techs are not actual medical professionals, but they do assist the nurses in basic patient care like baths, moving from the beds to chairs, feeding and vital signs. It is a certification that requires some classes but not actually a degree. It does allow you to be in a hospital setting to make sure you like it before you spend the time in school.

LVN/LPN (licened vocational/practical nurse) is the lowest level of actual board certified nurse. They usually go through a year straigh of intensive nursing school either based in a hospital or a technical school/junior college. It allows you to work as a nurse and is quicker than the RN route but until you get an RN there is very limited movement up, you will basically JUST be doing patient care and the actual things you can do as a nurse are limited by the state board of nursing. 

There are two different ways to become an RN or registered nurse. An associates level degree through a junior college with a two year program with some courses required before you can actually get it. It is a perfectly acceptable program to follow to practice as a nurse in the hospital, a lot of floor nurses are ADN-RNs. You can finish more quickly than a bachelors degree but still be a fully board certified RN this way.

A bachelors of science of nursing program is also an RN but is through a 4 year university and has a lot more other classes like English, maths, basic sciences and history then two years of nursing school that are almost exactly the same as the associates level. This degree is usually for people who want to be RNs but eventually want to be masters or doctorate level nurses because it is a full 4 year degree. In the hospital as a floor nurse there is no practical difference in what the BSN-RNs and just plain RNs do other than sometimes being put into more leadership positions but an associates level RN with more experiance will trump a new BSN-RN. There are also RN-BSN programs if you decide to go the associates level first and decide you later want to go back for more degrees.

Then there are a million new upper level degrees for nurses to go into but they get more complicated than I think you need right now. I know lots of nurses who did the quick and fast LVN/LPN program and started working while going to school for the RN/BSN degrees since they couldn’t afford to take 2-4 years off just for school.

I would try to find some local schools of nursing and talk to their advisors to see what they suggest. 

Post # 16
Member
1839 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

@StarryNight2011:  i am a pediatric nurse; i only have a bachelor’s degree. you don’t need a certificate or masters. at least not in the US as far as i know

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