(Closed) NWR – Babies at fancy restaurants – yes or no?

posted 8 years ago in Parenting
  • poll: Would you take a young baby to a fancy restaurant?

    Yes

    No

    Depends on the situation (like if my babysitter canceled)

  • Post # 152
    Member
    239 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: August 2012

    I have a 4 month old, and I voted no. Fancy restaurants aren’t made for young children and/or babies. there are plenty of family friendly places 🙂 I personally won’t take my son out to any restaurant at the moment.

    Post # 153
    Member
    6573 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: October 2014

    @peachacid:  you’re being entirely too literal. The sound of cutlery on China is perfectly acceptable for pretty much any restaurant. 

    And it’s not so much the “few seconds” that bothers me (and judging by many of the comments, I’m not the only one). It’s that I work hard and plan hard to have a perfect evening, and someone else has the nerve to think that no one else’s enjoyment matters, so long as they get what they want.

    I cannot control the people around me, but I’m absolutely allowed to expect certain standards of behavior to be followed. I bet if some seriously drunk people spent the evening making out and groping, while you and your SO tried to celebrate an anniversary in an expensive, classy restaurant, you’d be upset, annoyed, and offended. Yoid be PISSED if you spent your hard-earned money and ended up hearing a couple shouting at the top of their lungs in a fight too. How is a baby any less disruptive? Why’s a baby okay but a loud domestic dispute isn’t? Answer: it’s not.

     

     

     

    Post # 154
    Member
    152 posts
    Blushing bee
    • Wedding: August 2013

    @JessSeny:  sorry, but I stand by it. If someone chooses to have a baby, then they should accept that there are certain places or settings where children are not desired. I do not have children and when I pay for an expensive, “fancy” dinner out, I don’t want to hear your unruly children. They won’t be young and misbehaved forever, but until they aren’t, they don’t belong in certain social settings. 

    Post # 155
    Member
    3423 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: November 1999

    @Brittanyg20:  

     I am personally insulted when someone says “No tip”,

    Then you are far too touchy.

    that litterally screams power hungry.

    I don’t feel that way in this situation.

    If I’m dropping 500 on a meal + 200 or more for drink and the person responsible for my happiness can’t do anything about that happiness then yes, I’m not giving extra. 

    I guarantee you michelin star waiters are no where near min wage, they are very competitive jobs, and IMO it is the watier’s job to fix the situation.  Saying it is not their fault does not appease me, it is not my fault either, but I’m the one suffering.  

    Post # 156
    Member
    6458 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: June 2013

    @Horseradish:  I’m not being literal, I’m giving you an example.  If someone with a physical disability caused a minor disturbance, your entire night would be ruined.  Just as, if someone brought their baby and couldn’t silence the creature within a few seconds, your night would be ruined.  Don’t you think you’re the one with the problem?  I understand that babies don’t belong in fancy restaurants, I totally do.  But being so inflexible must create problems.  

    Anyway, I’m not trying to pick a fight.  It just rubs me the wrong way to hear that certain people don’t belong in certain places…which is what you’re saying when you want everyone to behave in a certain way.  Some people have lost the ability to “behave” and it sounds as though you wouldn’t be compassionate toward them.  

    Post # 157
    Member
    6573 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: October 2014

    @peachacid:  I dont see what is wrong with setting an expected threshold for a behavior. That’s basically what all of our social customs and etiquette is there for: picking the behavior suitable to the occasion.

    If you can’t dress appropriately for the office, should your boss let you slide? 

    how about teenagers playing video games on their phones in Church?

    It has nothing to do with being inflexible. It’s all about how everything has a time and a place.

    Post # 158
    Member
    1742 posts
    Bumble bee

    @Atalanta:  I would be shocked if handling a delicate situation relating to the conduct of a patron of the restaurant wasn’t the responsibility of the Maître d’ or a manager.  If a situation involving the conduct of another patron is not resolved as you would wish it resolved, you may certainly choose never to return to that restaurant and you may choose to communicate that to the captain of the Front of House, but it is not the fault of your waiter or waitress and his or her tip should not be affected.

    Post # 159
    Member
    3423 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: November 1999

    @mrsSonthebeach:  Aparently the baby was crying the entire evening.

    Post # 160
    Member
    3423 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: November 1999

    @This Time Round:  That’s crazy.  Donno about Canada but there are many establishments that have an age requirement in the US.  Often it is 21 for obvious reasons, It’d be logical that a wine bar would be 18 I assume in Canada.

    Post # 161
    Member
    3423 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: November 1999

    @MarriedToMyWork:  yes and by all means the waiter should consult with the manager and have them do whatever they need to do.  In other restuarants it’s the waiter who moves you to another table if you aren’t happy.  In that restaurant there wouldn’t be another table.

    Post # 162
    Member
    7439 posts
    Busy Beekeeper
    • Wedding: December 2012

    To @Atalanta:  You’d think it would be that straight forward / simple.

    But as I said, it proved out not to be.  Restaurants that serve food (as a Wine Bar does) cannot set an age limit evidently.

    A Bar-Bar or a Club can (which is 18 or 19 depending on what Province / Territory one is in in Canada) as they don’t specifically serve food

     

    Post # 163
    Member
    2056 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: June 2017

    @peachacid:  I don’t want to be nitpicky, but…  Someone with Parkinson’s and someone with a baby are two very different things.  One is a disability.  Turning away someone because they have Parkinson’s is very likely an offense that could be brought to court.  The other is not.  Turning away a baby…  Well, as This_Time_Round pointed out, it could still be an issue.  But there are places (at least in the US) that have managed to enact “adult only” hours.  So it isn’t always illegal.

    In my (limited) experience, I am much more likely to come across parents who won’t step it up (a number I won’t keep track of) versus someone with Parkinson’s who is causing a scene (0), and for this reason I would be much more sympathetic to the person with Parkinson’s than the parents who refuse to take control of the situation.

    Post # 164
    Member
    3518 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: August 2013

    @ButterflyButterfly:  no no no no no no no. A cheaper place, sure, but people are paying a lot of money to have a nice evening out at a fancy restaurant and you bringing their baby is like saying “I’m more important than you and the world revolves around me.” It’s so incredibly selfish I just see no excuse. Your babysitter cancelled? Find another one or stay home, that’s the risk you take when you decide to have children.

    Post # 165
    Member
    652 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: March 2015

    @Atalanta:  Your “opinion” is false. It is your waiters job to be knowledgeable of the menu, get your order correct and bring you what you asked for in good time. Not to kick people out of restaurants.

    View original reply
    @annifer:  My contention, however, is with some who seem to think they have a right to never hear a child fuss at all.

    +1

    View original reply
    @peachacid:  I’m not being literal, I’m giving you an example.  If someone with a physical disability caused a minor disturbance, your entire night would be ruined.  Just as, if someone brought their baby and couldn’t silence the creature within a few seconds, your night would be ruined.  Don’t you think you’re the one with the problem?  I understand that babies don’t belong in fancy restaurants, I totally do.  But being so inflexible must create problems.  

    +1

    View original reply
    @MarriedToMyWork: it is not the fault of your waiter or waitress and his or her tip should not be affected.

    &

    If the restaurant is forced to police the matter, they have to have a blanket ban or no ban at all, as “we can tell your child will be disruptive” will be disastrous for the restaurant on every level.  This is why in a properly functioning society it is best for parents to have enough social grace to realize that there are some places where their particular child should not be due to their particular child’s age and/or stage of development and understand that in those cases it is best if they voluntarily elect to keep the child out of the restaurant.

    +1

     
    View original reply
    @This Time Round: 
    …(Discrimination based on age).

    However, as proven out by the Ontario case / judgement, I also now know that the Restaurant’s hands are tied… and that there is little they can do about it

    The choice ultimately is mine… put up with it… or leave.

    +1

    Post # 166
    Member
    2389 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: July 2014 - Prague

    Pet peeve!!!!!!!!!!!!! Hate hate hate babies in nice restaurants. 

    The topic ‘NWR – Babies at fancy restaurants – yes or no?’ is closed to new replies.

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