(Closed) NWR- Cooking with Lard

posted 8 years ago in Wellness
Post # 3
Member
5147 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

I also want to start cooking with lard, but I haven’t yet because I haven’t found a good source (I haven’t looked too hard yet though). The lard at my grocery store is  hydrogenated, which I want to avoid.

Post # 4
Hostess
11068 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

@abbyful: The only thing with it though is that the taste can overpower everything. And no matter what you’re eating you feel like you’re eating meat dripping.

Post # 6
Hostess
11068 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

@lessons: It may have been, I didn’t know there were two types, that sounds really bad considering i’m a Food Teacher (!!) and I used it in pastry at school when experimenting with different fats for pastry.

Post # 7
Member
31 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: July 2011

@CatyLady:  I haven’t cooked with lard, so I didn’t know there were 2 types either!  But I’m in grad school for food/meat science, and I do know that the “leaf” or internal fat of pigs is generally more saturated than the backfat (aka fat back).  More unsaturation usually means the fat is more susceptible to oxidation, and that probably made the fat back lard taste more like meat drippings than the leaf lard.  WOW I’m a nerd. 

P.S.  I hope I didn’t sound snotty, I just really like meat-related products and I’ve been in school learning about them for waayyy too long.

Post # 8
Member
1398 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I’ve seen it in little plastic buckets in the refrigerated section of the grocery store. My grandma, who honestly made the best pie, and fried chicken, in the world, swore by lard. It makes the flakiest pie crusts in my oppinion. You do have to keep it covered and refrigerated.

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