(Closed) NWR Does anyone else have a Ragdoll/Siamese/super vocal cat?

posted 5 years ago in Pets
Post # 16
Member
4244 posts
Honey bee

Not currently, but I grew up with Siamese cats and my mom has two at the moment- I LOVE them so much 🙂 I miss my little friendly furball.

My mom was having this kind of trouble when her two cats were younger- some things she tried were playing with them LOTS before bed to tire them out, and also locking them in a room- sounds mean but they had a bed (with a heated blanket!), litter box, food and water- they probably meowed but she couldn’t hear them and they finally realized that no matter how much they meowed, they would get no attention. When you and your husband wake up and try to calm your cat down, you’re just reinforcing her behavior- she’s crying because she wants attention, and you’re giving it and rewarding her.

My mom’s cats now sleep all night in her room (in their own bed w/ a heated blanket 😛 ) but it did take some time and effort.

Post # 17
Member
2348 posts
Buzzing bee

BurlapnLace:  Hi! I had a very vocal kitty for 14 years. I’m a total cat lady so my advice is tried and true: 

1. You can train cats like you would train a dog. If kitty is talking all night, don’t reward that behavior with attention, since that’s what they want. Get a spray bottle, if kitty is crying at night, squirt them! If that doesn’t work, and they continue crying at night, put them in a different room so they don’t bother you. They will either get used to their “sleeping room” or they will stop crying at night. 

2. When cats are really vocal it’s often because they aren’t getting enough attention. Cats enjoy when you are vocal with them and physically affectionate. Say hello when you come home, pick them up for a little while. Play with them every day for at least 15-20 minutes. Sometimes if they’re talking just answer them in a sweet voice. Also, tiring them out does help. Get some toys that they can play with on their own. My kitties have always loved superballs (those little bouncy balls from vending machines).

3. Snap train! Whenever you discipline your cat either by spraying or putting them in their room, snap your fingers at them first. The kitty will learn that a snap means “Stop it!” Soon you won’t have to do the other discipline. Now when my little grey guy starts to scratch something I just snap and he stops immediately.  

Post # 18
Member
2837 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

BurlapnLace:  I had a Siamese who did the same thing– she’s howl- either at the door or the wall when she wanted attention.  And it was this deep throated meow.  She was such a sweetheart- I loveed her so much and I sadly, I wish our feline friend we have now was similar to her- personality wise, because now we have a little trouble maker.

My Siamese did it until she was very old– I don’t think I heard as much the last year of her life (she was 18.5 when she died)– they just tend to be vocal cats!!

Post # 20
Hostess
9630 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: March 2014 - Chicago, IL

beetee123:  Lol yep! I do the exact same thing!! 

Post # 21
Hostess
9630 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: March 2014 - Chicago, IL

BurlapnLace:  She is suuuch a cutie! I don’t think she’s full ragdoll because of the way her fur on her ears and paws looks, but never the less, what a pretty girl! Based on what you said, it’s most likely attention based. She’s crying because she knows mom and dad are in a room without her. I agree with PPs that you should try your best to ignore her and maybe she will eventually learn that that behavior is not rewarded. I’m going to follow this thread and see what others say as my kitty doesn’t want to leave us alone at night either.

Post # 22
Member
2350 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

I have a part tortie short hair who the most vocal cat. I found the more I chat with her, she will chat back. But she chats no matter what all day. She is very playful and 90% of the time its bec she wants to play.

Post # 24
Hostess
9630 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: March 2014 - Chicago, IL

BurlapnLace:  Aw, she really looks like a Birman to me.

Post # 25
Member
5264 posts
Bee Keeper

 

BurlapnLace:  Awww your cat is gorgeous! I have a super talkative male tuxedo cat. I talk to him and he talks back. We put both of our cats in the spare room at night because if we dont they are throwing their bodies at our door trying to get in. The spare room is basically their room and their litter and water and toys are all in that room. They will be a year old in a few days and they know that they have to go to their room at night time and when they hear our alarms in the morning they begin meowing for us to let them out

Post # 26
Member
738 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2016

omg i love your cats!!!!!

so cute hangin off the ledge like that!

Post # 27
Member
3682 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

She does not look like a purebred Ragdoll to me.

Honestly, she sounds lonely. I went through a similar thing with my Ragdoll, and when we bought a second one to keep him company, he shut up. He was just lonely and needed more attention.

As someone previously mentioned, and you can discuss this with your vet, large cats like this should really be free-fed (have food in their bowl at all times) unless they’re having weight issues. Cats don’t stick to the same kind of schedule that humans do, and she may very well be hungry at night when her bowl is empty.

Post # 28
Member
87 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: December 1969

Got a herd of Siamese and Oriental Shorthairs. Yap yap yap.  Well, more meow chirp mraww.

1 – Actually talking to them during the day.  Yes, full on conversation. I come home and Smacky comes running to chat.  I tell him about my day in return and he behaves.  I ignore him, he’s all over me screaming because he has important things to share.

2 – They need like minded cats. I started with one, Grace, and it sucked. They’re smart, active cats. Brought Smacky home and Grace calmed down.

3 – Check thyroid. Wicket was really restless at night, and crazy vocal. He had high thyroid, which is well controlled with medication and he’s back to normal. Thyroid issues are somewhat common in them.

4 – Appropriate play. These are active cats. They are little Porsche engines in muscle car bodies. They need jumping, leaping play. They’re also MENSA kitties.  They need games to think.  Mine know hide and seek. They will fetch. They’ll do stupid tricks. They NEED high places. Mine are on top of anything. Shelves, doors, cat perches. Up is good. These are cats who can sit in front of my 6’4″ fiance and leap to his shoulders with ease. We teach them to leap between us or cabinets.

5 – Open the door. Closed doors are a requirement to be fussed at. Mine don’t even always want in the room, but you’ll hear if a door is closed.

I live with 7 of them, a Bloodhound and a French Bulldog.  

Post # 29
Member
510 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

As a vet nurse I have seen a lot of vocal cats, the worst being the oriental breeds, Siamese, tonkinese ext. Radolls and Persians are also top of the list, they are noisy cats.

Post # 30
Member
87 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: December 1969

Rabbit56:  They are loud mouths.  But I don’t consider that a problem.  The hound baying is obnoxious.  The cats howling is funny.

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