(Closed) NWR: Euthanizing Disabled Children???

posted 8 years ago in Parenting
Post # 92
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995 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

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@Petor2011:  actually they appear much better off than my exMOH’s daughter, not that that is saying much!

So they do appear to have some level of self awareness…..what I’m confused about is this is a degenerative disease and they’re in their 40’s…did she at any point discuss this with them when they could still communicate?

Post # 93
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535 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: February 2011

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@sylvia.riggle:  That’s a very good question. I want to know now!

Post # 94
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13094 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

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@sylvia.riggle:  I realize they are 40.  But they are still the children of this woman who has therefore been watching their suffering for 40 years.

As far as quality of life, I agree that there isn’t an easy way to explicitly define what is sufficient quality of life and what isn’t.

But in the words of United States Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart (to describe his threshold test for pornography): “I know it when I see it.”

Post # 95
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995 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

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@Mrs.KMM:  Yes but they were not ALWAYS this way–if at some point they had expressed a desire to be euthanized if they ever reached a certain point I would be on board with you. But it isn’t mentioned if they ever expressed such a desire, when it is known that this is a degenerative disease without a cure.  I have even more of a problem with it if they knew what was coming and didn’t express a desire to die, and she wants to euthanize them anyway–because this isn’t a sudden unforeseen thing. 

I agree in euthanasia when a person has made their wishes for it clear and it’s a case of removing life support, or when there is absolutely no hope of recovery and a person is brain dead. But it’s very easy for people to say they’re rather die than be ________ when they haven’t experienced it themselves. I’ve seen both sides of it–people who went on living despite a terrible quality of life and people who were essentially euthanised because they were a financial burden. All I can say is that it often becomes a case of what is best for the family members, not about what the person truly wants.

Post # 96
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7605 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

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@MissHockey:  Listen, I think the real question we need to examine here is the fact that your name is “MissHockey” and that your avatar is that of the Calgary Flames.

Haha, just kidding & trying to lighten things up a bit.

I disagree that disabled children are in the same position as starving children.  Although they are both in awful situations, the option of a “cure” is different.  One child is held back by physical limitations and the other by situational.  So no, I don’t think that the mothers of starving children should kill them on purpose.  I can’t imagine what those families go through, either.

Post # 97
Member
747 posts
Busy bee

Why are you allowed to let them starve to death (way more painful) than euthanize them (painless and instant)??? This sounds like a stupid law to me. But bureaucracy is pretty stupid anyway…

Post # 98
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13094 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

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@sylvia.riggle:  According to the article you linked to, symptoms start in the first year of life and the major decline happens somewhere from age 2-6.  No child that age understands or can express their desire to have their suffering ended if it reaches a certain point.  That is beyond their level of understanding and comprehension.

Post # 99
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776 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2015

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@Juliepants:  haha 🙂

 

This is just a depressing topic in all!! Too heavy for a Friday afternoon that’s for sure!! lol

Post # 100
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995 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

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@Mrs.KMM:  Actually from the summary on Dr Phil the mother said: “After 25 years of watching them just exist, it’s time that somebody did something,” 

They’re in their 40s, so it seems that 25 years ago was when their sickness took a sever turn for the worst. At some point before that she could have attempted to ask the question, no?

Her son had a feeding tube inserted 17 years ago, her daughter had it recently. But since they were institutionalized, she either made the decision to insert those tubes or she’s given up custody of them. So either A. it was her call and she made her choice or B it isn’t her choice to make  it is the states 


Edit: in fact I just saw a picture of them at 15 years of age–looking just fine–obviously they had symptoms but there were not wheelchair bound or uncommunicative 
 

Post # 101
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4369 posts
Honey bee

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@bakerella:  I looked at the article. As I understand it, there is a difference between a vegetative state, in which there is still brain activity, even if it means that the person cannot control any part of their body, and brain death– the end of all brain activity.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brain_death

Brain death is the irreversible end of all brain activity (including involuntary activity necessary to sustain life) due to total necrosis of the cerebral neurons following loss of brain oxygenation. It should not be confused with a persistent vegetative state.”

Post # 102
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13094 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

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@sylvia.riggle:  Even if that when things really took their turn for the worst (25 years ago), because of the genetically caused severe mental retardation, these children may have never been able to understand and communicate any desires about their end of life wishes.

Post # 103
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995 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

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@SoupyCat:  True, and according to brain scans these children have brain activity-though they are surely mentally retarded

Post # 104
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4369 posts
Honey bee

For example, Terri Schiavo was not brain dead. She was, however, in a persistent vegetative state.

Post # 105
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4369 posts
Honey bee

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@sylvia.riggle:  I understand that. But the person I was replying to, MissHockey, mentioned brain death. I was just making the point that brain dead people have no chance of coming back.

Post # 106
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995 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

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@Mrs.KMM:  I’m not saying they necessarily did–but I do contend that it is certainly a question that should be asked

 

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