(Closed) NWR Have you ever bred your dog?

posted 7 years ago in Pets
Post # 48
Member
348 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

Please don’t do it.  You said this is your first dog, right? It’s easy to see why you’re excited & already thinking of more puppies. Take the time to enjoy her as your dog. Neuter her so that she’ll be in good health & so that you won’t have to worry about health risks later on (or her getting pregnant by an unneutered neighbor dog!).  You’ve already said that your dog is too old to show, so what would be the point in breeding her beyond doing it just because you want to?  She won’t have any titles, so you’ll basically be a backyard breeder.

 

You have to remember, that the vast majority of backyard breeders feel exactly as you feel right now. They don’t think they’re contributing to the problem because they love their dog & they’re just helping other people get cute puppies too.

Post # 50
Member
9821 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

There can be a lot of doom and gloom breeding dogs, and I’m sure any serious reputable breeder would tell you the same. However, a responsible breeder does it to further the breed. But they only pick the very best dogs, the ones with excellent structure and temperament. They agonize over which stud would best suit their bitch, and often spend huge amounts of money having semen shipped, versus using the mediocre dog next door. They spend hundreds, probably thousands of dollars putting titles on these dogs and health testing them.

If your dog has never been evaulated by a reputable breeder, has no titles, and you cannot say what her structural strengths and weaknesses are, then you really have no business breeding her IMO. It does not serve any other purpose than creating more pets, which the world does not need. I know you said you don’t want to hear that, but it’s the truth – I’m not sure why that wouldn’t impact your decision. What significant reasons do you have for wanting to breed her, other than wanting a puppy from her? Is that really more important than all the negatives?

Post # 51
Member
2375 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

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@Corgi-cariad:  There’s no reason why you can’t train her to show, because you’ll need almost as much training as she does.  There’s a surprising amount of work involved in being the handler of a show dog.  That way you’ll have some experience in the future.

And why do people breed with the risks?  Some are morons, some do it for the hope of money, some do it because they love the breed, and some do it because they want to see their dog’s name as Ch. MariContrary’s Fluffykins Boo Boo, call name Fido.  Every breeder wants to see a Ch. before one of their dog’s names. 

Also,

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@Westwood: is absolutely right about female corgis not being too friendly with each other.  Just because they’re related doesn’t mean they won’t try and kill each other on a regular basis. 

Post # 52
Member
2467 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

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@Corgi-cariad:  To be honest, your breeder telling you to wait two heat cycles to spay is horrible and it makes me angry. Your pup’s risk of cancer has increased over 50 fold. That’s a horrible risk to take just to acheive a better “look”. Sorry to sound harsh, but I work in the veterinary field and this is a huge issue I have with breeders. Dogs die because of this advice. 

Oh, and definitely don’t breed your pup. There are too many dogs who are killed every day because they can’t find a home. There’s no reason to bring more dogs into the world.

Post # 53
Member
2606 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

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@MrsPanda99:  As long as you research, network, take care of the breeding dogs and the puppies, and find good homes for the puppies, I don’t see why everyone gets so bent out of shape. There are already lots of dogs so no one else is allowed to become a breeder?

Very few people said no one else should be allowed to breed.  But if you need medical care, don’t you want someone who has been to medical school to treat you?  Someone who has put in the time, effort, research, study, and practice into becoming a doctor or nurse as opposed to paying some dude on the street $50 bucks to examine you and determine if you are healthy or not.

IF someone is going to breed, they should do it right.  That means doing their homework and passing the tests, (the tests being the show ring to prove that their dog meets the breed standard and the health tests a dog should be able to pass before reproducing).  Researching the breed, mentoring under an established breeder, showing, health testing.  

They need to be willing and able to be responsible for the health and well-being of any puppies they choose to bring into the world.  This means if two months after bringing home a puppy, Buyer #1 decides they just aren’t cut out for dog ownership, the breeder takes the dog back.  This means if two years after bringing home a puppy, Buyer #2 needs to move and cannot bring the dog with them, the breeder takes the dog back.  This means if three years after bringing home a puppy, Buyer #3 finds out their dog has a genetic disorder, the breeder reevaluates their breeding program and removes any affected dogs from their breeding pool.  This means if eight years after bringing home a puppy, Buyer #4 has a child who is allergic to their much-loved, now-senior dog and has to rehome it, the breeder takes the dog back.

There IS a huge overpopulation of dogs and cats, and not just in the US.  Animals are literally being euthanized daily because there just are not homes for them all, (not to mention the huge population of stay/feral animals out there, who are also reproducing at an alaraming rate).  So is it so hard to understand why some people are against breeding of any kind?  

My personal opinion is that breeding RESPONSIBLY is a good thing.  There are so many wonderful breeds out there that would no longer exist if EVERYONE stopped breeding.  Responsible breeders do what they do not for profit, because if you’re breeding right, you probably aren’t going to be making a dime…by the time you factor in show costs, health testing, stud fees, (and shipping fees for semen, if applicable), vet costs, supplies, etc., a breeder is LUCKY if they aren’t in the hole after breeding.  It is a huge investment of time, energy, and MONEY.  If you are breeding for profit, you aren’t breeding for the right reasons, and if you’re actually MAKING a profit, you are probably cutting corners.  A dog should be a beloved family member, not a uterus for your financial game.

I think by now MOST people know and agree that puppy-mills are terrible things.  But what many don’t realize is that as bad as puppy-mills are, backyard breeders (or irresponsible breeders, if you prefer that term), actually do more damage than puppy mills.  They may not keep their breeding stock in tiny, cramped cages where they receive little or no medical care, attention, exercise, or grooming…but backyard breeders are producing dogs, (and with no health testing, and often little or no thought to temperament, frequently they are unhealthy dogs), and contributing to the pet overpopulation faster than the horrible puppy-mills, and often for the same reason, (profit).  Even those who breed “just one litter” are adding to the overpopulation, especially because many of the puppies produced then go on to be bred “just once” and so on and so forth.

Responsible breeders contribute to the overpopulation, yes, in that every puppy produced adds to the total, and potentially takes a home from a shelter pet.  However, responsible breeders are aware of the problem, (many are actively involved in breed rescue as well), and breed sparingly.  One of the most responsible breeders I have come across produces one litter every several YEARS, usually when they are ready for another pup to raise and train for the show ring and Shutzhund.  

So no, we’re not saying NOBODY should be breeders.  We’re saying IF you want to breed, do it right…for the love of doG! 

Post # 54
Member
323 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

Dont do it… just dont. I could go on a whole big long rant as to why people should not do it just because they want “cute little puppies”… But I’m sure other people will cover it. 

I’m just going to chime in and second everyone that said to leave it to the reputable breeders. If you want a puppy oyu can look for rescue orgainzations that deal with the breed you want in your area, or even stalk the shelters – you can get puppies from them.

Post # 55
Member
9681 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

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@Miss Apricot:  Exactly ๐Ÿ™‚ I looooooove dogs and I agree with you. OP didn’t say that she wouldn’t do all of those things. I just felt like people were discouraging her without knowing all the facts of her plans. That’s why I said, if you’re going to do it right and it’s your passion, don’t let others discourage you from following your dreams ๐Ÿ™‚

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