(Closed) NWR: living in the USA? (long)

posted 8 years ago in Money
Post # 18
Member
1474 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2011 - Bent Creek Winery (Livermore, California); Reception: Family Residence (San Ramon, California)

Just want to add that the job market is insanely difficult here right now. Many people with BAs, MAs, and higher degrees take months to find steady employment, and a lot of us continue to struggle even after that.

Another thing to consider, but immigration itself can be really expensive. USCIS (US immigration) has all kinds of fees attached to their various forms and whatnot, and it’s often prudent to hire an immigration attorney because the process can be so difficult and complicated, which only increases the costs. Like others have said, it’d be a good idea to explore what visa options are even available to you and your Fiance before make any hard and fast decisions. (If you have more immigration questions, please feel free to PM me – I work in immigration, so I could be of some help.)

Post # 20
Member
1766 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

Is your Fiance a US citizen?  What licenses or certifications would you need to work as a social worker in the US?

I immigrated to the US from Europe, and it’s a lot of red tape.  People often underestimate the regulations and obstacles that come with this process.

Post # 21
Member
389 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

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@bookworm88:  Haha, the grass is almost flourescent from here! I have to admit, a year ago, I thought the same things, but once I moved here.. not so much. But I’m also in the most boring, touristy part of Spain (Costa de Sol). There’s literally no culture whatsoever here, which is something I miss a lot. I’ll never ever move to a city without a theater/museum/concert hall again!

And siestas and “mañana”-attitude are great until your toilet leaks or you have to get that important document 😀 I guess there’s always downsides, but I’m still having major culture shock, even after 10months of living here.

Post # 22
Member
1406 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

As an American who lives overseas, I have seen how the free healthcare works.  Health insurance in the U.S. isn’t cheap.  Plus, not sure if you are wanting kids but most countries I’ve lived in pay some sort of maternity leave.  In the U.S. you get paid for a few weeks through private insurance but not enough to take off the first+ years.  

Also, not sure if you’ve applied for a work visa but I know many American men who are married to local nationals but are having to extend their overseas tour b/c their wife can’t get a spousal visa immediately.  

Malta sounds wonderful, I think I’m gonna put it on my “must travel to” list.

Post # 23
Member
1766 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

Most of all, you will NEED a lot of money, just for moving and getting settled there. Don’t move if you don’t at least have $20k saved up. The more the better. Without US credit history, you are not financially trustworthy to anyone who wants to do business with you. You will have to leave deposits for virtually everything; housing, cell phones, credit cards. Financing a car will most likely not be an option in the beginning, so you will need to pay cash.

Post # 25
Member
1406 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

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@AprilJo2011:  Totally forgot about that one!  When I came overseas, it was impossible to set up my utilities since I only had credit in the U.S. but not in the home country.

Post # 26
Member
2889 posts
Sugar bee

I think you should stay in Malta or look into jobs in the EU where you can work. I am an American working in the EU and chose to stay here due to the poor job market in the US at the moment. I’ve also been to Malta and it is a lovely island but I did see a lack of industry. However many things seemed to be cheaper in Malta than in other European countries. Like restaurants for example. 

Also, I imagine you will have trouble finding a job/getting a visa in the US since you do not have a specialized degree and Maltese is, to my knowledge not in demand. I think you would quickly miss Malta. Have you considered the UK at all? You would have permission to work and live and the culture is so similar to Malta.

Post # 27
Member
254 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Yeah..if you think about living in the US first thing you need to look at the legal regulations. Its not just because your FI’s dad has a green card your Fiance will immediately get a green card straight away. It depends on how old your Fiance is and the status of Malta.., whether his dad is financially able to sponsor your Fiance. there is a huge green card backlog.  For you, the legal way for you to come over will be for you to get a work permit (since you’re not marrying a US citizen. Work permits has its own series of regulations to jump over. I’ve been in the US since college and went to grad school here and I’m on a work permit visa…I had to go through a lottery and I’m limited in the scope of things I can do. I had to find a company that was willing to sponsor me, notify immigration everytime I change addresses, and there have ben periods of time I was not able to leave the US.  Now that i am marrying Fiance I’m going to have to apply to undergo the greencard process and I’ve been trying to look for a lawyer and get the paperwork together. Lawyers have been quoting me sums such as $2000 to get the paperwork done.

Health insurance is a big concern here. If you get sick and you don’t have health insurance and get rushed to hospital, you can be in debt to thousands and thousands of dollars. Someone mentioned credit..when I  first came noone would issue me a credit card after college. I only started building my credit after I got a credit card through my company (which was a fortune 500 with loads of benefits).

Unfortunately social work is a very competitive field here and you’re up against a poor economy now. I would definitely do my research into immigration procedures and what you’re up against if you decide to come to the US. Your best bet is to find a company to sponsor you and handle all sorts of red tape for you.

Post # 28
Member
10283 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2011

There’s a heck of a lot of struggle over here, too. The economy is crap and jobs are few and far between. We’ve been lucky enough to not have been affected by any of this but there are so many people out there who have. It’s not unheard of to see CEO’s can canned and then have to resort to delivering pizzas or working retail. If you think you’re going to move to the states and set yourselves up with a cushy lifestyle, at least at first, you’re in dream land. You may be able to make it by but I don’t think it will be easy. Especially when there are so many born and bred Americans who can’t even make ends meet.

You may not make a ton of money in Malta but at least it’s still income. There is no guarantee of a job when moving to the states. Actually, you’d probably be at a bit of a disadvantage with the way that the job market is now. With so many natural born citizens out of work, assuming they have the same qualifications as you, it may be difficult to score the job over them. I realize that may sound kind of harsh but I think its reality with the way that our economy is.

If it were me, I would stay put at least until our economy turns around a bit. You may be struggling there but I’d almost bet money that you’d be struggling here, too. Except here, it would probably be even worse since so much about this country is less than ideal (like taxes, health care, etc).  

ETA: Just saw your update. Yea, it’s probably best to stay put for the time being. You could always revisit this move in a few years. Hopefully by then we’ve improved a bit over here.

Post # 29
Member
1766 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

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@texasbee:  I know! It’s like you don’t exist when they don’t know your financial history, isn’t it? I went to a dealership to look at cars and the salesman didn’t want to let me leave without signing a sales agreement. He kept telling me I could finance, no problem, blah, blah, blah.  Then he went and actually ran my credit score. After that, he couldn’t get me out of the dealership fast enough, haha! At this point, I had been working on building my credit history with a secured card for over 6 months. Obviously not long enough to have something to show for.

I didn’t have to worry about utilities in the beginning, because they were in my American roommate’s name, and my landlord was fine with just calling my employer to verify my salary. But I had a prepaid phone for quite a while because I couldn’t get a contract without a $1,000 deposit. Crazy!

Post # 30
Member
343 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

agree with PP-

 

I am a social worker in Pennsylvania.  You will want to make sure to research what state you are interested in and what kind of services are paid for by the state.  For example – I would with children who have mental health diagnosis – this is paid for 100% by the state of Pennsylvania.  In Michigan or other states it could be only 50% or even as low as 0% which means less employment in those areas.

Also, for social work you will need to see if your degree and licensing will transfer to whatever state you will be moving to.  Some states don’t allow the same license between states so I can only image what that would look like between countries.

Post # 31
Member
9916 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

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@bookworm88:  Spain has been in financial crisis for over a year now!!!!  Something like 50% of the twenty-somethings there are unemployed.  I know it’s not too much better here, but it’s not as desperate, I think.

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