(Closed) NWR: What Would You Do?

posted 6 years ago in Money
  • poll: If you received a free car, would you pay the giver back when you sold it?
    No, a gift is a gift and you shouldn't feel obligated to pay for it : (60 votes)
    86 %
    Yes, you received a free car to drive for 2 years, you shouldn't profit from it : (9 votes)
    13 %
    Other, please explain : (1 votes)
    1 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    9483 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper
    • Wedding: October 2012

    Honestly, I wouldn’t think to offer the money for the free car. I would automatically plan to use the money towards the new car expenses.  I could understand offering money though of the car was given and the person sold it within less than a year. 

    Post # 4
    Member
    11272 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: April 2012

    i can see both sides here but how you worded it, the car was a gift, not a loaner.

    Post # 5
    Member
    10573 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: January 2011

    A gift is a gift.  It would be nice though, if someone had a rough time gets some help that they do something nice for those who helped them once they are better off.

    Post # 6
    Member
    4416 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: June 2012

    @Rouquine:  I agree — it would be one thing if she sold the car really quickly after getting it, or if she sold the car and then just kept the money instead of getting a new car. But if she’s just trading in the old car for a newer car, I wouldn’t expect her to basically offer the trade-in value to the original gift-giver!

    Post # 7
    Member
    9674 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper
    • Wedding: September 2012

    The car was a gift so, no, I don’t feel she should have offered the money or felt obligated to pay anything back.  If the car had been only loaned that would be a different story, however.  But the gift was hers to do with as she chose.  What if it had been a necklace?  And a few years later she pawned or sold it, would she expect her sister to give her the money back for the necklace?  If she expected the money back from her sister, the car wasn’t a true gift.

    Post # 8
    Member
    7609 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper

    I’m in the “a gift is a gift” camp on this one.  If they had turned around and sold it the next DAY or something, I can see myself taking issue with it….but in this case, no.

    Post # 9
    Member
    701 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: June 2012

    I gave my dad a car once. He sold it and kept the money. I remember being slightly annoyed, but he reminded me that he had also put money into the car after I gave it to him, so I let it go.

    Post # 10
    Member
    606 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: June 2011

    If it was a gift, then no pay back necessary. My grandma gave me her old car, and when I sold it, I put it towards my new car, not paying her back. She would have looked at me cross-eyed if I had offered to give her the scrap value for her old car 2 years after she had given it to me. I’d say, same principle applies here.

    Post # 11
    Member
    2183 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: November 2011 - Florida Aquarium

    I have to say after years, the car was hers (and I assume titled to her), so it was her decision. And I’d happy that she was able to afford a new car with the help of our old one.

     

    Post # 12
    Member
    6743 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: June 2014

    I can see both sides and I think it honestly depends on what was said when the car was gifted over.  Was it “Hey, you can use this car for the time being until you get a new car”?  Because then it sounds like it was a loaner, not a gift.  Or was it more like, “Hey you need a car, we’re not using this, you can have this one?” Because then it sounds like it was a gift. 

    Also, if the girl offered money when she first received the car and the money was declined, I would say that’s even more reason not to offer the profit b/c it’s more evidence that this was a gift and that if no money was accepted when the car was gifted over, why would money be accepted or expected 2 years later? 

    I voted gift is a gift b/c that’s probably what happened here. 

    ETA:  As a PP noted about title – chances are if she sold the car, then the title was in her name.  If the car was really just a loaner, then the car’s title would probably have remained with the original owners and just “lent” to the girl who was driving it.  That’s not what it seems like happened here.  I don’t think that the profit should have been offered. 

    Post # 13
    Member
    9056 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper
    • Wedding: June 2010

    I think the intention of the gift was for the sister to have a car, and she still has a car (albeitdiffer stent one) so I wouldn’t expect to be offered to be paid back assuming she still needs a vehicle. 

     

    Post # 14
    Member
    2425 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: May 2012

    I would have offered to give the money back. Even if I know someone will refuse, it just seems polite and grateful. But then again, I doubt I would have accepted such a generous gift in the first place, it would make me feel uncomfortable.

    Post # 15
    Member
    135 posts
    Blushing bee
    • Wedding: June 2013

    I would say no, because in this case the sister was using it more which means paying maintenance to maintain the car so technically she’s getting her money back on the car.

    Post # 16
    Member
    4755 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: May 2012

    So if you gave my a purse for my birthday and I later decided to upgrade and sell the purse you gave me would you honestly expect me to give you the money I made from selling the purse you gave me? Uhh, no.

    The topic ‘NWR: What Would You Do?’ is closed to new replies.

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