(Closed) "Offbeat" baby names – Cultural Appropriation?

posted 5 years ago in Babies
Post # 2
Member
738 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2016

yeah ive noticed that heaps too… im child free by choice, so i like hearing all kinds of names come up!

But some of the names are bloody rediculous, their trying to be like celebrities and call their kids ‘Bluebells’ or ‘Apples’ or other random ass stuff lol but seriously bluebells? Sounds like blueballs lol

Post # 4
Member
1773 posts
Buzzing bee

Well, all names have an original culture they were from. I don’t see a problem with it, so long as it is a respectable name. My name is French. I am not French. I was named after my great grandmother, and my dad was adopted. He was Irish and native american. 

Post # 5
Member
8686 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

What part of the country are you in? Because this sounds a bit….ignorant. I know racism and ignorance is very much alive but I hope that in the future professional employment is based upon qualifications such as advanced education and experience and not something as silly as a name. There are no “rights” to a name.

 

sorry if Im coming off as snarky but I don’t understand why (other people’s) names matter so much to others. 

Post # 6
Member
8686 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

Amerie27:  ok now this I agree with. LOL! 

Post # 7
Member
7778 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2010

Well first off, I don’t know how you can assume that you know the cultural/ethnic heritage of people. 

My daughters names are Greek and Aramaic- but my husband is German and I’m Irish- so did we “steal” the baby names?

 

Post # 8
Member
7431 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2013

This sounds pretty closed minded to me. 

Post # 9
Member
5112 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2014

Woobee:  I think that a lot of names these days are just ridiculous, especially when they are just straight up made up names or funky spellings of real names… just no. As far as the cultural names go, I think it depends on how “cultural” the name is, as in how tied it is to that culture. The names you referenced “Cohen” and “Asher” I had absolutely no idea they were Jewish, I don’t think most people would see “Asher” and automatically think “Oh, that’s Jewish” unless perhaps you grew up in area heavily populated with Jewish people. Whereas, my Fiance and I are white or english/irish descent, so I think it would be totally weird if we named our theoretical child something like “Alejandro.” 

Post # 10
Member
4161 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

I was about to say something, but it wasn’t nice.  So I won’t.

Post # 11
Member
738 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2016

gelaine22:  haha i know right!!!!!

quiz who knows what woman named her daughter that?!?!??? 

 

Post # 12
Member
2455 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2017

My name is Greek, my mom’s and my sister’s names are Irish, and my dad’s name is Danish.  We have no connection to any of these.

FI’s name is English.  He has no heritage from there either.

Post # 13
Member
352 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

Woobee:  I think that it is simply an indication of cultural mixing as a modern day trend. Dintinct cultures formed because groups of people started doing certain things, wearing certain kinds of clothes, speaking a certain language etc while being geographically isolated from other groups. Wherever there is group to group contact there will be cultural appropriation. It goes both ways. With our abilities now to connect with anyone in the world and travel anywhere people are borrowing ideas and appropriating from different cultures more easily. I wouldn’t get offended by it at all. I would be flattered that they liked me and my culture so much. 

Post # 14
Member
738 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2016

SithLady:  i agree i had no bloody clue those names were jewish! lol

Post # 15
Member
471 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

Even the names we think of as “generic” came from somewhere. It would be like saying all Old Testament names can only be given to Jewish babies. No one else can use Sarah, Ben, Jake, Seth, David, Rachel, Rebecca, Michael…

Of course, some names are more commonly used only by ethnic groups. So “Cohen” may sound Jewish, but so is Michael. You can’t say one is okay for the non-Jewish to use and one isn’t.

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