Okay to break a glass if not Jewish?

posted 6 years ago in Secular
Post # 3
Member
705 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: February 1993

I really don’t think you should use something that is so clearly tied to the Jewish community in your secular wedding.  It’s very traditional and meaningful and obviously… well, Jewish, that for you to do it doesn’t make sense.  Pick something else 🙂

Post # 4
Member
4464 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: February 2012

There’s actually nothing positive about breaking the glass. You should read up on why Jewish people actually do this. It has nothing to do with marriage being forever. That might just be something nice that someone once made up. 

Post # 5
Member
5788 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2011

1. Thats not why people break a glass. Isn’t a reminder that joy comes with sorrow or something?

2. I’d find it so strange if I knew neither the bride or groom were jewish and broke a glass. It’d be like jumping the broom or something.

Post # 6
Member
51 posts
Worker bee

No, it’s not really appropriate if neither of yo. Are Jewish or have any connection to the faith. there is a lot of debate over what the breaking of the glass actually means and more often than not you’ll hear that it represents The destruction of the temple in Jerusalem. So it’s religious ties might be greater than you think. 

Post # 8
Member
2651 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

Lgens: why would jpong the broom be weird? I thought that was a celtic tradition much like handfasting.?

Op: I don’t think it’s a good idea, 🙁 sorry

Post # 9
Member
4464 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: February 2012

A unity candle is not a tradition, it’s just something nice and symbolic. Breaking the glass is a Jewish tradition spanning generations of a people all over the world. 

Post # 10
Member
5788 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2011

@imalittlebirdie:  really? learned something new today.

Post # 11
Member
466 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

@imalittlebirdie:  Jumping the broom is an African American tradition that was brought on during the slavery times because it was all they had to signify their marriages.

Post # 12
Member
175 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

Regarding the meaning of breaking the glass, there are NUMEROUS interpretations for why it is done as part of the Jewish wedding tradition. We are having an interfaith ceremony and originally we were choosing wording that explained that, but the rabbi suggested we choose a shorter passage because we’ll be wanting to get outta there!

My favorite reason is that its a superstition to keep bad spirits away. At the wedding the Rabbi will explain it it to temper our joy with sorrow. Its a tradition, so there isn’t anything particularly religious out it, my Fiance says it isn’t offensive. 

Post # 13
Member
2651 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

Lgenz and pcpwedding: it’s a welsh and celtic tradition that dates back to the pre Christian era. It’s a symbol is fertility and fidelity. 

I didn’t actually know it was an AfricanAmerican tradition.  

Ok done thread jacking

Post # 14
Member
9824 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

@NCPwedding:  I actually thought it originated in Wales.

Post # 15
Member
466 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

@KatyElle:  IT was actually originated in wales i just read but then became a more popular tradition during the slave trade times in Ghana, Africa. 

Anyone can jump the broom however beause its symbolism is to sweep away evil spirits that could cause negativity on your marriage.

However, breaking the glass probably not such a good idea.

http://www.aaregistry.org/historic_events/view/jumping-broom-short-history

Post # 16
Member
7977 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

Jumping the broom was also popular during the Middle Ages in England, because it was a symbol of the work of an unspecialised labourer. People would therefore use them to perform both “legitimate” and “illigitimate” marriages. In fact, in the 1800s then “jumping the broom” was discussed in parliament in uncomplimentary terms… it was associated with the poor and crinimal classes (which could at least partially have been a racial slur, seeing as it was associated with Celtic weddings, and Celts were discriminated against). Like the others, I only realised it had an African American link recently… in the UK it is associated with paganism and Celtic traditions.

Breaking the glass though… now that’s quite specific to Judaism. I’m not so sure about the symbolism there…

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