(Closed) Online colleges.

posted 8 years ago in Career
  • poll: Would you recommend an online college for graduate degree?
    YES : (3 votes)
    12 %
    NO : (13 votes)
    52 %
    Depends on area of study : (7 votes)
    28 %
    Other, I will explain below... : (2 votes)
    8 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    1106 posts
    Bumble bee

    Im attending mountain state university which is an online and regular college for my bachelors. It has been great!

    Post # 4
    Member
    3788 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: July 2011

    Edited — I take it back. I thought University of Phoenix was ONLY online, but it seems that they have campuses, too.

    I think it depends on their accreditation, but that varies with brick and mortar universities, too. I think that some people tend to think online classes (like community college) are easier, but if the program is accredited, it shouldn’t matter. That doesn’t always bear true, though.

    Post # 5
    Member
    1011 posts
    Bumble bee

    I have found that unless the professor is very dedicated, you really don’t learn as much in an online class.  The only time I had a great experience was when we were forced to to online group projects and required to respond to threads regularly and the professor guided the threads.

    Otherwise, based on my experience, I would question someone’s credentials.  Granted, I’ve taken a number of online classes since I worked full time while I obtained my last 2 graduate degrees.  There were no online classes when I obtained my BA or JD (back when email was in its infancy).

    Oh, my first 2 degrees that involved online classes, most of the lectures were taped from live lectures given in previous semesters (Dallas Theological Seminary & University of Texas School of Public Health).  For my most recent experience, I took classes at Houston Communtiy College.  All they did at the community college was tell us we had to sign up for online videos through Lynda.com.  One class had a few assignments.  The other class just had us do these step-by-step projects out of a book.  It makes me really question the quality of the education received by those community college students.  I don’t care so much for me, because with 4 degrees, I just did it for enrichment.

    Post # 7
    Member
    1011 posts
    Bumble bee

    Oh, the reason that the Dallas Theological Seminary developed so many online classes is that the found that when there were international students who came to the states for training, they didn’t usually go back.  Part of the seminary’s vision is to provide training to students in other countries so they are equipped to minister to them.  They had a very good program witha  TA assigned to half of each class to monitor and provide input.  Lectures had to be viewed during the assigned week (but could be at your convenience during the week).

    Post # 8
    Member
    14185 posts
    Honey Beekeeper
    • Wedding: June 2009

    It totally depends.

    I was attending a really reputable MBA/Masters of Engineering through Purdue. Purdue is a really good school. And the classes are the SAME classes and tests as offered online. They just set up a video recorder in class and you have to watch them later. Boring, but it was still high quality.

    Online colleges in general? I’m not a fan if you can actually get to a regular university. Plus they’re typically pricier b/c of the tech fees. Schools like Phoenix and Devry, well, just not a fan of the quality you receive unless you’re going for an AA or something like business or stuff like that. Even then, pick a better school. Some classes are OK to take online–i’m taking Medical Terminology all distant study. But it’s offered via a Chiropractic College. I’m taking Anatomy through a Medical School, all offered online. But only b/c i can’t physically take those on campus.

    I think it’s different when a “regular” university/college offers a program online, it’s another to be a 100% online college like Phoenix.

    Those online programs are the same as the online ones and they come with the name of the school. Nobody knew my Purdue degree would’ve been online unless I told them.

    They’re kinda boring IMO. I’d rather sit in class than sit and try to watch him lecture on my laptop. Snooze. For some subjects I see the feasibility, for some, it’s really hard to do them.

    Post # 9
    Member
    2207 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: July 2010

    My mom got her MBA online. I know she worked very hard, but she was often dissapointed with the quality of instruction. I also think she feels that her degree is not taken very seriously.

    On the other hand, I think she is glad she did and that she learned a lot.

    One thing you may want to do is look into whether you can complete a project as part of your program, something tangible. To the extent people take my mom’s degree seriously, it is when she talks about the projects she did. Hers was a working professionals program that her company paid for, so the program required her to take on a substantive program at work. Having something concrete to point to has been good for her, and you may find it beneficial for you as well. If you can’t do it through work, maybe for a non-profit (Ex. business or marketing plan for a NP, workforce needs analysis, audit, etc.).

    Good luck and congratulations on thinking about taking this step.

    Post # 11
    Member
    3125 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: December 2009

    When i did my undergrad at a regular university, i had an online class and it was just terrible that i dropped it and picked up another one. It’s just not the same, to me.  Geographically i’m pretty stuck, b/c i woudln’t seriously consider getting another degree nearby. I would consider getting my masters online, but only from a school with either accrediation, or a physical campus with a reputable program. I wouldn’t want to take the chance w/ an online-only school since the curriculum could suffer. A coworker does this, and has a lot of online group papers. I don’t think it’s challenging enough for me and the cost is just as $ (or more) as a traditional school.  I want to learn, not just participate and get a degree. Let us know what you decide! We are FL neighbors 🙂

    Post # 12
    Member
    1288 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: June 2010 - Indiana Memorial Union

    What kind of program are you interested in and what do you want to do with it?

    Some of my work involves looking at consultant CVs. Many have gone to online colleges and get paid the max government daily rate.. so, not everyone looks down at online degrees.

    A lot of state colleges have satellite schools that offer more flexible class times. Their degrees won’t say it was an offshoot, just _ University. Is that an option you’re considering?

    Post # 14
    Member
    4024 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: September 2010

    I say no becuase I have taken online classes for college, and they are harder than going to school. If you miss one link or something, you are screwed. Plus, you have to be super motivated and make yourself log on and everything and check back all the time and truthfully, I’m lazy when it comes to that! So it might work for some, but not for me, or any of my friends for the same reason.

    Post # 15
    Member
    14185 posts
    Honey Beekeeper
    • Wedding: June 2009

    Some more thoughts: I’d DEFINITELY pick a reputable program, though. With a communications BS, not sure what you want for yoru masters, but you definitely want something that makes you competitive. Just ONE of my stinkin’ classes (3 credits) was $3500. They aren’t always cheap. But the program was specifically designed for working adult professionals.

    If you plan on working, they’re a good way to go. But if you want to do it just to avoid GOING to school for 2 years for a regular masters, don’t do it. They’re boring and lack a lot of the stimulation of a regular university. You’re out on your own, no help, left field.

    If I could’ve done this program locally, I would’ve chosen that option. But no st louis university would allow me into their engineering programs b/c I didn’t have an engineering undergrad. Nor did they have joint MBA programs at night.

    Oh and I had to find a proctor for all my tests. Luckily the university was right there. And it takes time to turn in homework. I had to scan and fax it all over. TOok a long long time.

    Are you going to work full time while working on your MS? IF so, I think that is more ‘accepted’ than if you don’t work but just attend online college unless the program is really specific. Does your company pay for any of this? Mine paid for 100% of my tuition and it would’ve been totally worth it. Otherwise I NEVER would’ve done it.

    Also, a lot of my coworkers did traditioanl colleges nearby, like WashU. They said it was harder to take “regular” masters b/c they were on business travel a lot and would miss stuff in class. With online classes, if you’re in this position, you can watch them on travel. It sucks, but you do what you gotta do.

    Post # 16
    Member
    4024 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: September 2010

    Also, if you get confused or lost or have a question, its really hard to get a hold of your teacher. And sometimes the links and stuff don’t work, then you can get behind.

    The topic ‘Online colleges.’ is closed to new replies.

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