Opalescent diamonds are gorgeous! Anyone heard of them?

posted 3 months ago in Rings
Post # 77
Member
3116 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2017

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@anabee323:  If somebody has an aversion to or is triggered by the mention of bodily fluids, then say that. But don’t project by labeling PPs reply as rude and jealous just because she doesn’t agree with OP’s opinion of the ring. Don’t ask for opinions if you only wanted an echo chamber. It’s ridiculous really. 

Post # 78
Member
854 posts
Busy bee

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@bluecutie00:  I mean I don’t know the intent behind PP’s comments, but that’s at least how I read some of the PP’s posts, which were saying it was rude/gross. And I don’t ordinarily have an aversion to bodily fluids, but I guess I do have an aversion to reading about “frozen spit”–it somehow seems both aversive and vulgar to me, similar to if someone said a low colored diamond looked like frozen urine. That’s all I got. I do think that the jealousy comments were unwarranted.

Post # 79
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3116 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2017

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@xiphosura:  I actually have a blue sapphire and don’t prefer clear, traditional stones. I think moonstones are beautiful. I’m not a traditionalist by any means…. But this opalescent diamond is a scam to me unless the pricepoint is significantly less. .. You love the look of a moonstone? Great! My opinion is buy the moonstone and save thousands. Don’t be tricked into the price tag of a diamond that is poor quality based on their newest marketing pitch. I’m in sales for a living. Companies spend MILLIONS on marketing to run scams likes this. These chocolate, salt&pepper and opalescent stones that were previously garbage are now revenue…I can smell marketing from a mile away. That’s my honest opinion.

Post # 80
Member
514 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

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@bluecutie00:  1. What happened to not derailing this post further? I agreed to drop it. 

2. Nowhere did I say that anyone was jealous. The *only* thing I said was that comparing a diamond that someone finds pretty to wads of spit is rude. Especially since some bees have already shared they have similar stones. 

3. Are you ready to let this go? 

Post # 81
Member
1058 posts
Bumble bee

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@bluecutie00:  I think if and when these stones become a massive trend, we will indeed have to be wary of prices jumping up unnecessarily (just as most of us are already wary of price-gouging when it comes to the portion of the diamond industry that places its value on “perfection” rather than “uniqueness”—they’re both marketing strategies, one has simply been around longer). I remember when Kay and other big box stores were trying super hard to push chocolate diamonds as rare, luxury items, and it was transparent as hell. I do feel a little sorry for people who shelled out huge amounts of money just to have the “latest thing” in that instance, because a few years later it was like it had never happened. I hope everyone who came out of that period with chocolate diamonds sincerely loves them to this day, but I have a feeling some did end up regretting the choice. Anyway, big box stores are not going to carry heavily included diamonds unless there is a massive demand for them, as in, one that significantly rivals clear diamonds, otherwise, it’s simply not worth it for them to alter their supply chains. 

At the moment I would recommend that anyone who is interested in owning an included stone work closely with a smallscale jeweler who has a special interest in them and knows their shit as far as metalworking goes, although that’s my advice for all jewelry purchases, frankly, having spent some time working for craftspeople of that description. This is what we did, and frankly, I’m happy to pay for that kind of individualized process with a skilled craftsperson, especially for a design I happen to love. For the record, the bulk of the price of my ring was actually the metalwork (as straightforward as it might seem), not the stone. 

So bottom line, everyone should get what they love, regardless of trendiness of “value”, just make sure the ring itself is well fabricated and sourced from a reputable jeweler. 

Okay, this has been interesting, but I’m so out of this conversation now. 

Post # 82
Member
60 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: July 2021

wow after reading most of the comments i feel i should chip in abit about my ring journey

so when looking for an e-ring i knew i didn’t want a diamond, at least not in the classic sense. My mother has a diamond ring and i personally (for my own preferences) felt it was a little flashy, didn’t like the look of a ball of fire, disco ball on my hand.

so i started looking at different gemstones, that was when i chanced upon salt and pepper diamonds – didn’t like the look of the very peppery diamonds that i kept seeing

ultimately i changed upon white sapphire and thought they were absolutely beautiful, clear stones, with white flashes of sparkle, clear facets

so me and the fiancé went down to a local jewler to get a white sapphire cut (they didn’t have the cut i want in person)

fast forward to waiting for my stone – i chanced upon a bunch of saltier salt and pepper diamonds – the more white kind and felllll in love, i loved the beautiful glittery white/off white gems so much, but it was too late we already made a down payment on the sapphire

when the white sapphire came, it was so absolutely beautiful in the shop, we chose a solitaire setting and went home

when i was proposed to – i loved the ring in the beginning, but then started questioning my choice when it started getting cloudy/dirty, and also when i saw diamond rings that were cheaper than my custom ring i started questioning whether or not i wanted a classic diamond ring

more browsing on the internet and i fell in love with the overly sparkly diamonds i thought i wouldn’t like??

it was very confusing, i learned afterwards that i just felt a bit confused and felt like i didn’t get the “best deal’

HOWEVER when i learned how to clean my sapphire, and it was throwing crazy sparkle and flash, not the kind a diamond does, but in its own beautiful glowy way i fell in love with it all over again

 

ALL THIS TO SAY

– only get this stone if you absolutely want it (not because it might be more affordable) you can always find an affordable version of what you like

– research about it!! how it will look, how to clean it, etc.

– see how it looks in different lightings

 

in retrospect i wouldn’t change anything about my ring, but my ring journey taught me a lot at the same time, hope it helps you!

Post # 83
Member
1563 posts
Bumble bee

I don’t think the ‘traditional’ diamond industry or ‘traditional’ diamond fans get to decide what other people find attractive, worthwhile and of value. All marketing ploys are set up in the exact same way: make this look pretty and special so people will want it. I’m also sure finding an included diamond that’s ideal for the salt and pepper aesthetic (or the like) isn’t particularly easy – for example even dispersion of inclusions, even colour. They are also more eco friendly. 

Wear whatever stones you love with pride and joy. 

Post # 84
Member
60 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: July 2021

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@xiphosura:  could you post a photo of yours, i love love icy slat and pepper diamonds 

Post # 85
Hostess
2542 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2005 - Shreveport, LA

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@LittleFrenchBee:  I think these are beautiful!!! I have a nice good quality diamond and tons of moissanite and gemstone rings and I’ve never seen anything as beautiful and unique! I’m obsessed now! I found one on Etsy for a great price too! Thanks for sharing this with us 💕

Post # 86
Member
1447 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2016

I love that they are different than anything I’ve ever seen, and I love that you’ve found something that makes you swoon! I think if it’s the stone you want to go with you should!

Post # 87
Member
1058 posts
Bumble bee

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@pizzacrumbs:  It’s on the second page of this thread, if you want to take a look. That photo is actually inaccurate as of recently, since I had my setting changed from rose to yellow gold (I love rose, but it brought out some unfortunate orange undertones in my skin that I didn’t know I had), and the contrast between the silver of the diamond and warm yellow gold is stunning. I would post a more recent pic, but I’ve only got them on my phone and I don’t have the appropriate dongle (don’t get me started, lol). 

Post # 88
Member
1058 posts
Bumble bee

Also (and then I’m really done), I wanted to add that “opalescent” is not necessarily a marketing term, it’s a descriptor, like “brown” or “yellow” “gray” or “clear” or “cloudy”. It is an adjective meaning “Showing various colors, as an opal does.” It does kind of sound like it means “a diamond that’s trying to be an opal”, which could perhaps be confusing, but it really is just an adjective. “Silvermist”, “Salt and Pepper”, “Rustic” and “Crushed Ice”, on the other hand, are absolutely marketing terms, just like “Chocolate” in the place of “brown or “Canary” in the place of “yellow”. I didn’t get the impression that the OP was asking, “What do you think about the concept of a marketing strategy that might make use of the particular look of these stones?”, but rather, “What do you think of stones that look like this?”. I think we can agree that ALL marketing strategies are meant to fabricate “need”, and therefore can’t be trusted to accurately convey value.

Capitalism is invariably gross at a certain point, usually when a company or product reaches the height of popularity. I tend to think it’s good to question why we buy things, and to care about where they come from and what went into making them, but at this point, almost no one can get through life (or the month) without getting some of that “gross” on them. There is no moral high ground to be had here. I think the best we can do for now is to make purchases that we feel good about, that “inspire joy” (ick) or speak to us in some way, because that really is the only way to measure the value of an object. 

P.S. I’d say the term “Frozen Spit” is actually on the same level as “Salt and Pepper” in terms of its goal, oddly enough—attempting to convey/invoke “feelings” about a product rather than a neutral description (at least, where I come from, spit isn’t considered neutral, otherwise folks wouldn’t hurl it at people they disliked). What’s the opposite of a marketing term? 

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