Outdoorsy bees – share your best hiking/camping tips

posted 4 months ago in Holidays
Post # 16
Member
977 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2017

This is from a 3 night trip I took! I also second good socks, something with merino wool like smart wool, icebreaker, etc.

The website steepandcheap. Com is a great place to get gear, although too tight of a timeline for this trip!

Post # 17
Member
2247 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

elliebee357 :  Most of this has already been mentioned already but here goes. Also, some of this is more appropriate for car-camping (pack everything in the car and park at/near your campsite) rather than backpacking (hike to your campsite with all of your stuff). Both are fun, just very different to prep for. 

Clothing: extra socks, flip flops, clothing that can be worn in layers, gloves, hat

Campsite Items: garbage bags (keep them handy), headlamp, wet wipes, toilet paper, extra seating, hammock, dish soap, plastic tablecloth, matches, paper towels

Personal Items: wet wipes, sunscreen, at least one extra gallon of water, 

Food: baked potatoes (in aluminum foil, add salt and pepper), soups, PB&J sandwiches, instant coffee (the freeze-dried stuff, just add hot water/milk and cream/sugar), energy bars, fruit

Miscellaneous: If backpacking, make sure to load your backpack correctly! My spouse was miserable on one trip because he put the bear cannister (with food inside) too high in his pack and it made it uncomfortably top-heavy. This is very helpful: https://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/loading-backpack.html I cannot overstress the importance of packing your backpack correctly. 

From our overnight backpacking trip to Mt. Whitney in 2013:

Post # 18
Member
1693 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2018

anev :  I second you on EVERYTHING. Especially the blister info (so so important) and also the head lamp! 

elliebee357 :  Don’t get overwlemed with all this good advice. While it’s appropriate and neccessary to have solid preperation, don’t fret: you will forget something essential, you will regret it but you will likey still have an awesome time if you bring the most important thing with you: a great attitude! (which it seems like you have)

Camping/Hiking has a steep (and sometimes horrible)  learning curve, where you find out what you need the most, when you don’t have it and this happens to  e v e r y o n e. So don’t go crazy, and feel you have to cover every single base but be prepared as possible without trying to carry a pack that is just too unrealistically heavy. Then go out there and enjoy! 

If you feel like you are just gonna get too bogged down, I reccomend reading up in a few ultra light hiking blogs (you can find good leads in pinterest of all places hahah) and you can pick and choice the tips they have to bring everything you feel you will need without all the weight. 

I wish I was coming with you guys, your adventure sounds like it’s gonna be great!

Post # 19
Member
671 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

Will you have a water source? That makes a big difference in how light you can travel. You’ll need a refillable wayer bottle, probably a pot (or a couple stacking pots) to boil water and cook over a fire, and matches.  Make sure the pot has no plastic bits, and a handle to hang it on a branch is nice. The matches should be in a waterproof container – a ziploc at least. A good sun hat also helps if you’re going to be somewhere without a lot of shade.

Also, a small sewing kit and a multi-tool or a small knife and scissors are nice to have. And I can’t hike or camp without a stash of chocolate, some teabags, and a steel mug for the tea.

And don’t pack too many clothes, they’re a lot of extra weight!

Post # 21
Member
1693 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2018

elliebee357 :  yeah, take everything with a grain of salt. You arent hiking alone, so you won’t have to have everything. Several sets of pots etc is truly overkill. Since you mention your climbing gear is also with you (Please tell me the other, more exerienced hikers are taking their ropes!!) your pack is gonna be pretty heavy anyway. So just really stick with super basic. Between your partner and you: one of you takes one head light, one of you takes blister bandaids, one of you takes a multi knife tool, one of you takes a tiny bit of toothpaste etc. You divide the food provisions in two packs with you a taking lesser amount, and in your group you decide how many sets of pots, fuel etc are needed and divide.  Easy peasy. Your climbing stuff: make sure you leave all unnecessary items behind. I would share my belay device with my climbing partner as well as as my expresses, friends, cams and other stuff only one person needs at a time (of course a normal amount of the little stuff is okay to take and necessary) You can then divide all this stuff between the two of you.  

Take one very versatile outfit you can layer with and super lightweight warmer stuff (I would take a lighter jacket for sure and layer it with long sleeve fine wool undergarmet for the evenings. take a lighter polarfleece vest if you have one, a teeshirt and a sleevless shirt. It would be great if all of these shirts, except the wool one were the outdoor version. they are lighter and dry fast and you can rinse them out at night if you need to and the’ll be dry. They also wick the sweat away when you wear them. You do not need extra sleeping stuff for two nights, just sleep in the shirt you didn wear much) Take light zip off pants and youre done. If you are not up super high in the mountains, I don’t think you will need gloves, just rough it, we are talking two nights. Maybe a little polarfleece hat if you tend to get cold on your head and doesnt weigh much. 

Seriously, your climbing pack is gonna be heavy enough (I know mine is!) so don’t stress it and don’t overpack! Girl your trip is gonna be awesome! Good on you!

Post # 22
Member
2247 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

elliebee357 :  Gloves are not necessary, just nice to have at higher altitudes. The first time we climbed a 14-er, both D. H.  and I forgot gloves and it was below freezing for about half of our 7 hour hike. Our hands were red and stinging. 

Shesaidyes :  I agree! for 2 nights, you don’t need dedicated pajamas. Just wear the clothes you wore on your first day.

Fun tip: if it’s cold at night, stuff your outfit/clothes for the following day in the bottom of your sleeping bag over night; they’ll be nice warm in the morning and you won’t have to put on cold clothing in cold tent. 

Post # 23
Member
977 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2017

elliebee357 :  you’ll have a blast!  Another keep warm at night tip is to boil water and put it in a Nalgene bottle and put it in your sleeping bag with you!

Post # 24
Member
150 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

Have fun!

If you don’t already have a pack and plan to buy one before you go, please, please, please load it up with weight at the store and go for a walk around (this is normal at every outdoor store I’ve been to, they have weighted bags you can put in the pack). You can (and should!) get one of the more experienced hikers to help you fit your pack so that the weight is on your hips, close to your body, and off your shoulders, but if the pack itself doens’t fit you well, you’ll never get it as comfy as if it does.

If you don’t already have broken in hiking shoes, I would honestly consider broken in runners if the terrain isn’t going to be too crazy/wet and you don’t have really weak ankles. Nothing ruins a trip faster than blisters from new shoes! They also make two-layer sockers which “guarantee” no blisters. I don’t know how well they work, but I’ve had good luck with them.

The only other thing I didn’t see mentioned (and I’m not sure if its at all relevant to where you are going) is to be bear aware (which will also help discourage other critters like raccoons if they are in the area). This means things like making noise as you hike (with 8 of you, you should be good!), having a food cache (an established camp should have something for this), and also making sure you don’t bring snacks or even scented things like toothpaste into your tent. If you’re in a pretty ‘camping-lite’ situation or sleeping in a cabin, this is less important, but I’m not quite sure what your situation is going to be and I’m from somewhere with a fair few bears, so we try and keep it in mind when we are out in more wild areas.

Have a blast and remember to take lots of pictures! 🙂

Post # 25
Member
93 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: April 2017

kittykatc :  I totally agree about the face wipes! We camp often in the summer and Darling Husband likes to go to places in the middle of nowhere (not even outhouses). Face wipes make me feel human again lol! I think I willl splurge on fancier ones after reading this though, I have been using the burt’s bees ones but something from Sephora would be lovely while camping 🙂

Post # 26
Member
13 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: June 2019

redheadbride2016 :  Right?! I can go a long time without showering or using a proper toilet as long as I have my face wipes!

The ‘Stay Balanced’ ones from OLEHENRIKSEN are amazzzzing. One side is soft and the other side is textured so you actually get a good exfoliating scrub. I have dry and sensitive skin and they work great for me. Not over drying as long as you use some facial oil or moisturizer afterwards. And they smell really pleasant as well ☺️

Post # 27
Member
93 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: April 2017

kittykatc :  Oh I will check those out! I have been considering trying one of the new clinique types, they have 2 kinds out one is part of their pep-start line and another is a post workout face and body wipe that I thought would be good for camping 🙂

Post # 30
Member
2247 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

elliebee357 :  Gorgeous photo! It sounds like you had a wonderful time. Welcome back!  laughing

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