(Closed) Photo question: does a bigger file size = higher resolution photo?

posted 6 years ago in Photos/Videos
Post # 3
Member
451 posts
Helper bee

That depends… are they the same file type?  Is one set jpg and one gif or something?  Different types can have the same number of pixels but take up different amounts of space.

Post # 4
Member
2607 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

My wedding photos are about 10MB, but my proofs are only 60k

Size difference will for sure effect the resolution, but 6-7MB should still be fine for enlargements.  Why not send one to a one hour place and order a single 8×10 copy just to see how they turn out?

Post # 5
Member
451 posts
Helper bee

I don’t know what types you have yet, but my guess is that the wedding pictures are either smaller in pixels or of lower quality.  I hope they wouldn’t give you lesser quality images for your wedding pictures!  Usually there is a tradeoff, though.

Post # 6
Member
7904 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: March 2012 - Pelican Grand Beach Resort

Your wedding pictures may be less edited too. You can check the pixel size in a number of photo programs. I know my engagement photos were post-edited, but my wedding photos received normal editing, mostly color correcting, so the same resolution photo is smaller in file size because there’s less information.

Post # 7
Member
9142 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2013 - St. Augustine Beach, FL

Depends but usually yes.  It could be that the wedding photos are at a lower resolution because the photographer took lower resolution pictures so s/he could fit more on the memory card.  It will only affect the quality if you blow it up past 8×10 and sometimes depending on the shot you can get a bigger enlargement and still not notice a difference.

Post # 8
Member
255 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

I generally shoot weddings and portraits in RAW but at the medium size setting, meaning files are plenty big for very large prints, but do not need to be big enough to make billboard sized prints (although I have had one image used in a full billboard ad and the file was able to be upsized to be used that large without appreciable loss of quality).  It’s possible the engagement files were shot at a higher RAW resolution, and when compressed they are larger than the wedding photos.  However, the sizes of your wedding files are certainly large enough for good sized prints.  Hope that helps. 🙂

Post # 9
Member
1314 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2006

There are so many variables that can impact file size, and so many photographers do different things.  In general in order to make good enlargements your file DPI should be 240-300.  And it also depends on what you consider an enlargement.  What does your contract state about file delivery?

Post # 10
Member
4 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: September 2006

Your file size on both wedding and engagement is fine. The actual pixel dimensions are what you need to look at. i.e….2800×4000 etc….B&W images have a smaller file size too. There are a lot of variables that determine finished resolution (camera used, cropping, b&w or color…etc..) but even the 4-7mb is fine. Those can print over sized prints without a problem. Also, in your file information it might list the dpi as 300, 240 or even 72 – don’t worry about the numbers because the dpi applies to the output format. Your file size is fine.

Can the bigger file size equate to more resolution, sure – but does it add sharpness, etc, no…not for what you’re talking about. Even the 4-7mb files have plenty of resolution power for your enlargements, even 16×20’s etc. I’ve printed with that plenty over the years.

Post # 12
Member
1314 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2006

@mspartridge:  Keep in mind that no professional is likely to deliver 1600-2000 images.  Why they have the approximate total number they take in their contract is to be frank, a bit asinine.  The important part is to give people an idea oh how many edited images are to be delivered.  Most full time pros are in the 50-100 per hour of work range.

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