(Closed) Photographer Etiquette

posted 6 years ago in Photos/Videos
Post # 3
Member
944 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2013

With IPhones, Blackberries, etc., it’s going to be impossible to get people to stop, I have some friends that are lost without the smartphones LOL. Some OPs have problems with FB too, you can make an announcement before the ceremony but good luck with that! I’m more concerned with someone’s phone going off with a gangsta rap ringtone during my ceremony!

Post # 4
Member
3572 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

Usually people know not to get in the photographer’s way.

Post # 5
Member
2216 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

Others are allowed to take photos even with a pro photographer covering the day.

I have a different point of view than most, but I would actually encourage guests to take photos.  My DJ told people not to during some of our important events, and guess what, the pro photographer’s card became corrupted.  We are having a really hard time tracking down any pictures because of the announcement.  Just something to think about….

 

Post # 7
Member
951 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

A lot of my close friends are into photography though not on a professional level. One thing I am planning is to have a DSLR camera on every table with a tag on it asking them to ‘have fun and take pictures of yourselves and of the happy couple!’

Our photographer will not be staying for the reception because she is starting at 7am to do our morning ceremony, so I thought this would be a fun alternative.

Post # 8
Member
2425 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

Most photographer contracts have an exclusivity clause, meaning that they are the only professional (i.e. paid) photographer at the event. But having guests take pictures is fine!

Post # 9
Member
1314 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2006

@MrsTVLover:  Most guests actually do not know this. It blows my mind how guests behave with cameras at weddings.

With the rare exception to stories like @coffeegal85:‘s, guests generally do more harm than good when it comes to photography at your wedding.  They will get into the way of the photographer either by physically standing up and blocking shots, or by ruining exposures by using forward firing flash.  It’s inevitable and it happens at nearly every wedding I shoot.

And if you don’t have a ruined shot or two you have the whole fact that many photos of your guests will have guests with iPhones, iPads, compact point and shoots, or DSLRs in their hands.  These devices change how people interact with one another.  I understand the need and desire for photography more than most people, but just in the last couple of years it feels like things have changed a bit and it’s gotten out of hand.  Photographing a ceremony these days feels like walking down the aisle at Best Buy.  And for what?  I see guests post their photos and tag my clients in them and to be blunt they are just not good at all.  Maybe they have more meaning and value to others, but I personally hate being tagged in poor quality photos.  Maybe that’s the purist in me speaking.

Sadly even if you were on board with totally eliminating all guest photography at your wedding you would have a really difficult time doing this.  At best people are having some success with unplugged ceremonies, but I’ve yet to hear of completely unplugged weddings.

It’s not the place of the photographer to dictate who takes photos at a wedding.  So long as we are the exclusive professionals hired to cover an event, the most I want to get involved with someone else’s photo taking is to move then out of our way at critical moments.  And we do have to do this frequently.  And sometimes the biggest offenders are the people closest to the couple.

Post # 10
Hostess
1427 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

I don’t think it should be a problem as long as the guests don’t get in the way. What I ran into was when we did group photos and family photos, everyone wanted to have that picture taken with their camera. In the end; I told everyone that the pro would take a better version than ANYONE could since he is the pro with the big fancy camera and I’ll send copies. That way it made it much more steamlined instead of one group = 15+ cameras and 5 minutes to do one picture.

Post # 11
Member
2116 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

I actually plan to discuss this with my photographer. My sister’s boyfriend is a good photographer, and I’m hoping that he will take some pictures too. However, during the ceremony, I plan to ask everyone to NOT take pictures so that they do not ruin the pro photographer’s shots.

 

But during the reception, I want everyone to take as many pics as they can. I’m hoping he’ll understand. IF he doesn’t, well, too bad for him 😛

Post # 12
Member
1314 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2006

@inky_1:  Your photographer shouldn’t care beyond being able to deliver a quality product to you.  If your guests interfere with that process than it’s really too bad for you.  Personally I would want my reception to be an awesome dance party and not an amateur photo shoot-off.

Post # 13
Member
743 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

In short – nope – it should not be a problem – if the photog is experienced, he/she should be able to work around other guests taking photos.

HOWEVER (i did not think of this before I got married) – if people stay after to take photos of the “portraits” (i.e. the fancy family photos) – you need to make sure everyone looks at the photog and not “aunt sally” trying to snap off a few shots.  You are paying the photog big $$ to take nice photos, and it would suck if, in the pro photos, not everyone is looking at the photog.

Just keep that in mind…I wish I put an announcement in our ceremony saying something like “photos are encouraged at all times EXCEPT during the posed portraits”

Post # 14
Member
1314 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2006

@Rock Hugger:  This can be a huge time sponge for family photos.  When we take family photos we won’t allow people to be taking shots simultaneously while they are behind us.  It’s too confusing and someone invariably winds up looking in the wrong direction.  It however is not our place to tell them they can’t, so unless the couple says no we allow them a moment after we’ve taken our shots to take theirs.  But this slows down the process tremendously and most of our couples just get irritated at the family member or friend doing this and tell them to stop.

Post # 15
Member
743 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

@continuumphotography:  Yep – I agree with you completly!  Again, that is one piece of advice I wish I had before I got married!  And I just read your post, and I did not mean to offend you (or even hint at offending!) My experience comes from my (1) outdoor wedding, so I don’t think flashes were really an issue.  And everyone stayed seated during our ceremony, so the photogs could move around as they please.

I understand your want to not have guests take photos at a wedding, but (at least in my circle) that would be received poorly. (very poorly)  Granted – no one went crazy with photos (most folks were dancing at the reception), but people still like to cature their own snapshots.  And while I have a DVD of amazing photos from my photogs, the only folks I have shared them with are the moms….not because I don’t want to share, but more because most of the guests would only be interested in 1 or 2 of the 850 photos I have, and who has time to sit and look through all the photos?  Sigh…I guess when I get that hour of “free time” when the clocks change, I can use it to just email photos to people.. 🙂

Post # 16
Member
1686 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I think it’s important for guests to be aware of the professional photographer and not get in the way; it’s someone with a job to do that the bride and groom are paying money for, and just good manners besides.

At the same time, I’d be really put off by a pro that wanted me to discourage my guests from taking their own snapshots and tried to push me toward not allowing it. (So what if people’s personal photos are crappy? They have been, pretty much since the dawn of photography. 🙂 I would be afraid that someone with that kind of attitude might be rude to my guests or make them uncomfortable. 

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