(Closed) Photographers I need your help!

posted 7 years ago in Photos/Videos
Post # 3
Member
449 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

@Mrs.H2B: I love my Nikon D700, although I do not shoot weddings (I am a food photographer). It was around 2700$ when I got it a year and a half ago, so I think it should be closer to 2000$ range now. It’s a Full Frame camer, so you’d need to upgrade your lenses from DX

Post # 4
Member
1405 posts
Bumble bee

@Mrs.H2B:  You def want to go full frame if you want to do weddings.  If you are set on Nikon, that means a D700 or a D3.  The D700 body only is around 2700 and you don’t want to know what the D3 costs.  You will also need a speedlight, and fast lenses.  Most quality “fast” lenses are going to be over 1000 bucks each.  At minimum, I would get a 24-70 F2.8, a 70-200 F2.8, and a fast prime, either 24, 35, or 50mm.  You will eventually also need a macro lens for doing close up of the rings, and could need a wide angle for doing large group shots in tight spaces.  Last, you will need a backup (which you already have) but the focal lengths are much different due to the crop factor which needs to be considered.

Honestly, I would keep doing what you are doing until you raise enough money to fund the proper equipment.  You can’t really charge pro rates without  pro equipment, and IMO it’s not worth doing weddings for rates much lower than market from a business standpoint.  Also, to be completely candid, the fact that you have to ask this question from what equipment is required tells me you are not ready to do weddings.  You may want to do some reading, or purchase some instructional videos or attend a workshop.

Post # 6
Member
399 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@Mrs.H2B: I completely agree with User. Unfortunately $3,000 probably isn’t going to buy what you need to properly shoot a wedding. Portrait sessions and weddings are COMPLETELY different in every sense. My suggestion would be to keep shooting portraits, save up money, shadow a professional wedding photographer, and leap into weddings later this year or next wedding season. Being a good portrait photographer doesn’t qualify you to be a wedding photographer just as being a good food or landscape photographer doesn’t qualify you. You have seconds to catch a moment during a wedding, can rarely set things up or change your camera settings, and there are no do-overs if you mess it up. Have you done anything at all with weddings before? If not I wouldn’t take money for them and make sure the client knows you’re inexperienced.

Also, a site like photo.net would probably be a more helpful place for you to find photo advice than a wedding website full of brides. =)

Post # 7
Member
11325 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2011

Most places have a camera shop that will rent out bodies and lenses. I’d recommend you narrow your choices and rent a few to try before you make a big purchase. Also, you’ll probably need to rent lenses for your first few weddings until you have more capital. You’ll really want to use top of the line glass (often the best way to combat terrible lighting conditions) and 1000 is not going to cut it to stock up on what you need. 

Post # 8
Member
1405 posts
Bumble bee

The D300 is an all around better camera, although it’s still not full frame.  Since it has the autofocus motor built into the camera it can accept all lenses where as the D300 can only use the nikon lenses with the motor built in which severely limits you.

Honestly, I would consider renting a full frame camera and lenses for these gigs until you can afford to buy the proper gear.  You are going to need full frame equipment so it doesn’t seem to make a lot of sense to purchase another crop body.

Post # 10
Member
1000 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

@USER876: I completely agree!

@Mrs.H2B: I shoot weddings with a Nikon D700 and the ISO performance is out of this world! I wouldn’t trade my two 700s for ANYTHING, not even the D3. I’m small, so the lighter camera body is perfect, and the D3 actually doesn’t have much on the 700 for the price difference. If you get the 700 you’ll never go back and you’ll never need to upgrade; it’s definitely worth going a little over budget to have a camera you know you won’t need to replace until the day shutter dies for good.

Post # 11
Member
1405 posts
Bumble bee

@Mrs.H2B:  You have to gauge how economical it is to rent lenses, it can get costly renting 2-3 at a time per event.

Post # 12
Member
4 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: June 2006

I am also a photographer and building my business slowly. Although i would LOVE a full frame camera/lens, my D300 and D300s have been just wonderful.  One day though…one day…

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