(Closed) Photography is not a Profession

posted 8 years ago in Photos/Videos
Post # 3
Member
7695 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2010

Very interesting! Ive never thought about it that way but all of that makes a lot of sense.

Post # 4
Member
6998 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2011

Agreed! very interesting. but just because they are considered amateur based on that article doesnt mean they cant be the most talented photographer you have ever seen. Still very intriguing

Post # 5
Member
11325 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2011

What is the point of this post? What type of category you categorize photographers into is really just semantics… if you want to call it a profession vs. trade or whatever. Is the point that there are a lot of photographers? true. Or a lot of bad ones who think they’re good? also true. I’m just not really sure what point your’e trying to make here? Regardless of anything photography is not a profession/trade/job that is overseen by an agency that would grant these types of name designations and Ken Rockwell is just a guy… so yea. I’m confused. 

Post # 6
Member
948 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2018 - Coyaba Resort, Montego Bay

I guess I don’t understand the need for this article?  He writes things to get a response, so it isn’t that surprising.  What is the point?

Post # 7
Member
546 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

I also don’t understand the point of this post.  Everyone knows someone that calls themself a photographer…and shouldn’t.  But good photography is certainly a highly valued skill.  Does it matter if people call it a profession?  If the rules for a profession are a degree and some sort of accredidation…there are probably lots of people who call themselves a professional that aren’t. 

Post # 8
Member
2142 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

If you use the logic that a profession does not produce a physical item then how could Architecture be considered a profession? Architects certainly do produce a physical item- you would have problems if they did not deliver a blueprint or design during their employment.

Similarly, you are indeed paying for a photographer and a baker’s knowledge. It is rare someone can produce high-quality work without knowledge and experience.

Regardless, as other posters have said, it is all semantics.

Post # 9
Member
2090 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

“Professionals are paid for what they know, not for what they do or produce.”

I selected and paid my professional photographer for what she knows and also what she produces. She has knowledge of light (natural and artificial), angles, reflection, etc. that I don’t have. That knowledge, and her artistic ability, make her an amazing photographer. I could have hired John Doe from craigslist who decided to call himself a “professional wedding photographer” to make some extra dough, and doesn’t have the knowledge my photog did. I went with her because of her final product – which is directly based on her knowledge of her craft.

IMO, this article make silly distinction. Most professionals are paid for both knowledge and production, I don’t think you can separate the two are easily as the writer believes.

Post # 10
Member
10366 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

Why does it matter what category a photographer falls into? A photographer is a photographer. Does it matter what the technicalities are?

Post # 11
Member
739 posts
Busy bee

great article @USER876 good o know I am a Full-Time Career Pro.  Can you post the source of the article i would love to read the whole thing. Oh are you a member of DWF? If so you should post it there too 🙂

Post # 12
Member
90 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

That was a bizarre article, and very poorly organized.

Post # 13
Member
1986 posts
Buzzing bee

Some photographers actually do need degrees to have their job. Just saying 🙂

 

Post # 14
Member
2392 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

Um, I don’t get it.  The word “professional” has two definitions.  As much as I like accurate definitions, I think getting really caught up in what is a profession and what is a trade feels a little bit classist.

Post # 15
Member
7770 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

Now aday, with digital imaging and easy access to cameras and printers, a lot of people think they are photographers.  However, there definitely are professionals out there.

Plus, I am a photographer.  A B&W darkroom, college trained, fine art photographer.  Photography is a broad term and applies to many different things.  There are many skills necessary to be a good photographer.  

Post # 16
Member
4518 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

Ehh, I kind of see the semantics point…kind of.

But the article’s main point (that “Professionals are paid for what they know, not for what they do or produce”) is inherently contradictory. What a photographer KNOWS about photography (lighting, shutter speed, f-stops, a zillion other things) directly affects what that photographer PRODUCES. So to distinguish between the knowledge and the product is not really possible, or even desirable.

Pointless distinction, in my opinion.

ETA: after reading through the previous posts, I realize others made this exact same point. I agree with you!

 

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