(Closed) Photography Rights

posted 6 years ago in Photos/Videos
Post # 3
Member
9142 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2013 - St. Augustine Beach, FL

It means you cannot make prints or copies of any of the pictures on your own without a release signed by the photographer.  Most photographers are giving up these rights unless they’re rellay highend because they don’t want to deal with a bride calling them years later to get a copy of a print.  Bottomline, most brides will want the rights to their photographs so they can go and print whatever they want, whenever they want.  If you don’t get the rights, prepare to purchase a lot of pictures within the first year or two or risk the photographer not properly archiving your photos for printing in 10-20 years.

Post # 4
Member
6248 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 1900

We made sure the photographer we chose would give us printing rights (a signed release that we can present when we have prints made).  Of course, our photographer still owns these images, but we can make as many prints as we want for our personal use.

 

I would ask your photographer directly if they mean they still own the images or if they mean you cannot even print images for your own use.

Post # 5
Member
13010 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

If you want the rights and want to use this photographer, clarify that they aren’t talking about the copyrights.  Changing copyrights is a legal process; the photographer can give you rights to your photos for personal use while maintaining copyrights (which was explained to me as, you cant print the photos in any professional publication without their permission).

My photographer maintains full copyright over all the images, but grants me the rights to print photos and gives them all to be, un-watermarked, on disc.  It’s written in my contract as such.

Post # 6
Member
790 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: February 2014

Abbie is correct.

Post # 7
Member
85 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: January 2013

Photographers put this in their contract to make sure that clients know that the photos are THEIR property, ultimately. And, even though he/she may sign over printing rights to you, the photos will always belong to the photographer. This is their way of ensuring that they can use the images on their website/portfolio, etc. Afterall, it is their work. As the others here have suggested, I would make sure he will sign over the printing rights to you. 

Post # 9
Member
934 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

My photography contract states that my photographer retains the copyright, but allows me to display the images online and print them for my personal use – commercial use is not allowed.

Post # 10
Member
26 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Yeah my is that same, we can pretty much use them for personal use… I don’t know a time when I would ever need them for professional use anyways 🙂

Post # 11
Member
8453 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

The photographer we booked has included copyright release as part of our photography package.  I would definitely get clarification on this before booking anyone.

Post # 12
Member
188 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

Hi All, I am just starting to look for an engagement photographer. I got a quote for a session for 200 dollars, and the DVD + rights will be an extra 200 dollars. Does that sound right to you?

I know many people get a package which includes engagement and wedding photography, so it’s hard to tell the price for just engagement. Seems like 300-500 is the range for just engagement sessions… So 400 is OK I guess?

I’m getting a little nervous about cost so early in the whole engagement/wedding planning!

Post # 13
Member
790 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: February 2014

Pumpkin- Yes $400 is a normal price point for an engagement session. $400-$500 is the average price from a quality pro.

Post # 14
Member
188 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

@Styles:  Thank you! That makes me feel better.

Post # 15
Member
6543 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: September 2012

There is a huge difference between Printing Rights, and Copyright.

For myself and most photographers, we give a Print Release. This is a lifetime release allowing you to make unlimited reproductions from your disk for personal, non-commercial use. We retain ALL copyright. That means you can print until your hearts desire, but you may not edit/alter the images, enter them into contests, or use them for profit. 

Giving up Copyright means I no longer own my images. I can no longer use them for marketing, on my website, blog, facebook, in an add, or to showcase for future clients to see my work. As such, if I get an inqiry for someone wanting FULL COPYRIGHT (generally they are confused and don’t know what they’re asking) it is a *hefty* fee on top of my package price. By giving up all copyright, I’m losing revenue and the potential for booking future weddings based on my inability to use those images to promote myself. 

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