(Closed) Photos on web pixel size – photographer help?

posted 7 years ago in Photos/Videos
Post # 3
Member
394 posts
Helper bee

600 pixels for the long side. 72ppi for web resolution. 300ppi is for printing. that is how i size facebook preview images for clients. 

hope it helps 🙂

Post # 5
Member
1405 posts
Bumble bee

It really depends on what you are doing with the images.  You want the image size to compliment where you are putting them without them being resized.  Usually when images are resized by third party programs, image quality is lost.  I like to post the largest image I can.

On facebook, you can post images up to 720 px on the long side, any larger, and facebook resizes them.

I wouldn’t mess with DPI, unless you are personally printing the images and need a specific size……it can get you into trouble.  Keep it at 72 as atomic said which compliments lcd monitors.

Last, you may want to do your web resizes as an export from the original raw file.  Each time you open change and resave a JPEG the image becomes more compressed and quality is lost.

Post # 6
Member
739 posts
Busy bee

ALWAYS make a copy of the images and re size those so you don’t accidentally save your originals to 72 dpi. Once you go down in size the info is thrown out and you can’t go back. I always save everything at 800px Long side @ 72dpi and with an sprgb color profile. This is IDEAL for web. Are you using lightroom? There is a super easy way to export them for web and add a watermark all in a click of a button.

Post # 7
Member
1405 posts
Bumble bee

@PizzutiStudios: As an aside, are you happy with the sharpening in lightroom?  I hate it, esp for smaller websize images.  I export the resized image as a TIF, and then use another program to sharpen for web, save as JPG, and then disregard the TIF. 

Remember facebook max size is 720 on the long side, and you dnn’t want facebook to resize your images because they don’t use very good algorithms.

Post # 8
Member
739 posts
Busy bee

@USER I usually sharpen in PS I’m not crazy about the way LR does it and I don’t over sharpen either will look like crap on web no matter where you post it. That said I only sharpen my high res edits then send them through LR to be compressed for web. I usually save everything in 800 since that’s whats going onto the blog, portfolio, and proofing gallery. They don’t look bad on FB but make sure you embed your srgb profile in the image because FB will screw with our color otherwise.

Post # 9
Member
1405 posts
Bumble bee

@PizzutiStudios:  That is a great point about the color space.  color space is a whole other issue.  I don’t believe all web browsers are color managed though (like firefox).   That is something I am still investigating.

Post # 11
Member
739 posts
Busy bee

Basically at 4×6 @300 you are still making a 4×6 size print out of that. It’s WAY to big. You should be saving at 72 dpi anything over that for the web is completely overkill and will make your site really slow. 

@User I always shoot and edit in RBG but all screen and most print labs use srgb. There are some labs out there that use RGB to get the most out of the colors you just have to ask for your labs profile. Anything you are saving for web you always want srbg because that is what most browsers and sites like FB and flicker use that. If your images are looking flat or the colors are all off or desaturated then its an issue with your color profile being embedded.

Post # 12
Member
1405 posts
Bumble bee

@PizzutiStudios:  Thanks for the info.

 

Sera…..you should consider making a copy of your images from the original not “saving as.”  And then when you want to resize it, do it again, from the original, intead of  “saving as.”  I am assuming you are working with JPG’s and each time you resave them they loose image quality and detail.

I think you should have images on your website larger than 600 px, but that is my opinion.  Depending on what host you use, that is probably why they are loading so slow, esp if it’s flash based.

I never find the need  to go to 300 dpi unless I was trying to print a certain size image at home.  When burning disks, do what PS said……keep it at 72 dpi.  Give the customer full size images or maybe images that are at least 2000 on the long side, and then a websize version that is 600 or 800 on the long side.  All of this is at 72 dpi.

 

 

 

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