(Closed) pigment ink stamping on envelopes *frustrated*

posted 9 years ago in Paper
Post # 3
Member
330 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2008

The best thing to do with pigment ink is to heat set it. That’s the only way that I know of to keep the ink from smearing without embossing it. You’ll need an embossing heat tool to set the ink. But you might even consider embossing, too. It’ll raise the image and add a nice shine to the image, and doesn’t take too long to do. Hope that helps a little!

Post # 4
Member
4382 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: June 2010 - Ceremony - First United Methodist Church; Reception - My parents' house!

What paper are you using?

Post # 6
Member
4567 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

Not at all! Just sprinkle the powder on the ink, use the heat gun to make it all raised and hard and TA DA! Prettiness.

Post # 8
Member
330 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2008

nope, your ink color won’t make a difference. Just get clear embossing powder and the embossing heat gun. Stamp your image, sprinkle the embossing powder over the image, shake off the extra powder, and use the heat gun to melt the powder and you’re done! It really is a lot easier than it sounds. And it will add a little extra special touch to your envelopes!

Post # 9
Member
251 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 1990

I’m not familar with stamping or that particular brand of ink, but I will try to apply my knowledge of the medium in general to see if it will help!  What ink base are you using?  Is the ink water or alcohol based?  Different inks are better for different papers, and “permanent” markers and such use alcohol based inks, which are better for protecting against smears.  I’m sure you can use alcohol based inks with your stamp, and I would recommend trying that if you haven’t already.  Paper can affect ink absorbtion as well.  If your paper is super smooth, glossy, metallic, photo paper, or some other type of less porous/absorbent paper type, ink will take longer to absorb and dry, or sometimes not dry at all.  You can try using watered down acrylic paint, acrylic paint sticks to just about anything- well, impasto/super thick applications can be peeled off but a thin application should be fine.

You can try taking a blow dryer and running the high heat over the paper, perhaps heated air will make it dry.  Unfortunately it may never be smear-proof depending on the ink and paper type, and just be careful not to use it on freshly applied ink as the air blasts may make it run and drip.  Also if you are using a thin or delicate paper, the heat may not be good for it.

Post # 11
Member
33 posts
Newbee

If the ink is still wet, it should’t be too late to apply to the envelopes. If you have a paper source near you, you can take one in and they can test some options before you go to the trouble of buying the gun and the powder.  

I usually only have difficulty stamping shimmer or metallic envelopes.  

Rather than buying the heat gun ~ as silly as it sounds, try a blow dryer first (without powders or anything)

If all else fails, it may be cheaper or easier to find substitute response envelopes.

Let me know if you have any other questions ~ 

Post # 14
Member
7053 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

I too heart embossing thanks to Paper Source!  Yours look amazing! 

Post # 15
Member
330 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2008

wow your envelopes look great! so glad that we introduced you to the wonderful world of embossing πŸ˜€

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