(Closed) Plantar fasciitis – anyone have experience with this?

posted 5 years ago in Wellness
Post # 3
Member
2250 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@Baroness_Meg:  I’m a massage therapy student, we treat this a lot! I can recommend a couple things to try at home, but I see you are an Ontario bee… I’d definitely recommend booking an appointment with an RMT! Even if it is only 1/2 hour πŸ™‚

I have to say that that is not a common place to get plantar fasciitis! It is almost always closer to your heel, or along the arch of your foot, like this:

If I were assessing you, I would be looking at your gait (how you walk normally), as well as your shoes, to see if maybe there is something going on with your movement that is causing more pressure on this area. How did your Dr. diagnose you, if you don’t mind me asking?

A couple of things that I usually recommend to my patients with plantar fasciitis:

1. Your calf muscles attach into your Achilles tendon, which attaches to your calcaneus (heel) and if they are tight, they create a direct pull on the fascia (connective tissue) and muscles along the bottom of your foot. Lots of self massage and calf stretches will help with this! For a good stretch, try balancing on the edge of a step when going up the stairs, on the balls of your feet, and letting your heels drop towards the ground. No bouncing when you stretch! And hold for at least 30 seconds. It should be completely pain free… if it is painful, back off a bit.

2. Put a golf ball in the freezer to get it nice and cold, and roll it under your foot, focusing on the areas that are adhesed. It will definitely cause some pain at first because you are breaking up the adhesions, but if you keep doing it (3x/day), it will help! This is something you can do when you are sitting down watching TV, on the computer, whenever πŸ™‚

3. Self massage the area, and perform lots of range of motion exercises to keep the area well circulated for healing (moving your toes and your ankle in all directions, 3x/day).

If you have any other questions let me know πŸ™‚ Sorry for rambling, this stuff is so much easier to explain in person!

Post # 5
Member
2250 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@Baroness_Meg:  Just don’t go too crazy with the golf ball at first, in case it turns out not to be that! Don’t want to do more damage than good.

 

Just out of curiosity, if you squeeze all of your toes together with your hand (see the first picture of the image below), does it reproduce the pain? Your symptoms sound a lot like Morton’s neuroma, which is far less common, but still possible!

 

 

Here is a site that will give you some general info about Morton’s neuroma:

 

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/mortons-neuroma/DS00468

 

Post # 6
Member
10571 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

I have it, along with some other foot issues.  It was really bad as a teen, but orthotics helped quite a bit.  You should look into a good place to get orthotics made.  Personally, I’ve had better luck with an orthotist rather than a podiatrist.

 

The stretch listed above is helpful.  I also had a doctor tell me to do the towel stretch.  Sit down with your leg stretched out.  Loop a towel around your foot up near your toes and pull consistently until your arms are tired.

 

Post # 7
Member
1405 posts
Bumble bee

When I had it I would freeze a 16 ounce water bottle instead of a golf ball.

Post # 9
Member
2224 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

I had it when i was a dog walker, walkin dogs all day every day. I got inserts from my podiatrist and never walked barefoot: always with shoes or my dr. Scholl’s slippers. I also took tylenol for the pain when it was bad.

Post # 10
Member
7651 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2012

My husband got it a few years ago. He had worn really bad shoes. He went in and they gave him stretches and told him to use a golf ball to roll under his foot.

He also got new shoes with correct inserts, so I would maybe check into some good shoes, especially if yours are starting to wear out. I would also ask about a pair of really good insoles.

Post # 12
Member
3553 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

I just figured out I’ve got this yesterday. I commute to work about 2 miles on foot and I trashed the insides of my snowboots this winter which did some bad things for my feet. I’ve got the heel pain in my right foot. Currently I’ve got my foot wraped to support my arch it’s helping the pain enough that I should be able to get home. After work I’m going to go buy an arch support I can wear on my foot.

Post # 13
Member
604 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

@megz06:  yep my Fiance has that and he bought some inserts …Dr Scholls …where you stand on a machine and it tells you what size etc to get….when it does play him up he streches it out and I give him a foot rub.

Post # 14
Member
2615 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2012 - Southern California

Darling Husband has it & a frozen water bottle really helps alleviate the pain for him!  By him wearing quality shoes/inserts to work has helped tremendously :]

Post # 15
Member
2250 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

Arch support is ok, but you should also consider doing some exercises to strengthen the muscles in the bottom of your foot! The problem with orthotics is that they can let your muscles get lazy, because the insert is doing all of the work for them. If you don’t use them, you lose them! If the muscles at the very base of your body are weak, it can really throw off the whole system, from the feet up. Something to think about πŸ™‚

Post # 16
Member
2250 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@Baroness_Meg:   If you came into the clinic, I would refer you to see a Dr. and probably just do some pain relief work around the area. There are a lot of different things that can cause a neuroma, so treatment will really depend on what the doctors find! They might do an Xray or something similar to get a better idea of what’s going on.

Right now, avoid the golf ball if it is a neuroma, this won’t help! Haha. Use cold compresses to help with the pain, some gentle massage and range of motion of the toes (spread your toes apart to take the pressure off the nerve) and ankle to help reduce swelling and inflammation, calf massage to take off some of the pressure of the muscles that insert into the foot, and get your butt back to the doctor if it doesn’t get better in the next couple of days!

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