(Closed) Please critique my programs!

posted 4 years ago in Ceremony
Post # 3
Member
478 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

Third line of the benediction “groomh ave” to “groom have.” Just a small typo. On that same line, I would change “our mothers” to “their mothers,” as you’re talking about bride and groom in third person.

In the breaking of the glass section, I’d change “To remind us that” to “A reminder that” because I think it flows better with the rest of the section.

These are just suggestions. I’m a copyeditor, so I may be a bit picky.

Aside from these changes, it looks great! Congratulations on your upcoming wedding! 🙂

 

Post # 4
Member
102 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

are your wedding guests going to be primarily Jewish or not?  I dont have my program info with me (on my work computer) but i found some verbage that was a little more descriptive for a few of the items (my fiancee isnt Jewish so half of the guests wont be either..,perhaps not necessary if most of the attendees already know what you are talking about).  I can get that info to you if you wanted to see another option…

Post # 7
Member
102 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

 

 

Here is what is on my program (first draft!)

 

Ketubah (Jewish Marriage Contract).   One of the oldest traditions in a Jewish wedding is the signing of the Ketubah.  The Ketubah describes the commitment that the bride and groom make to each other.  After the ceremony, XX & XX will sign the Ketubah in the presence of their witnesses.  The Ketubah will hang in their home as a reminder of this day and their devotion to each other.

—this would normally say signed before the ceremony, and in the presence of their Rabbi-  but we are getting married by a Judge hence the changes…

Chuppah (The Wedding Canopy).   The Wedding Ceremony takes places under the Chuppah.  The Chuppah symbolizes the home that XX and XX will build and share together.  It is open to all sides to signify to family and friends that they are always welcome.

Sheva  Brachot (Seven Blessings).    Seven Blessings are recited to celebrate the creation of the Universe, or Man and Woman, and the companionship and joy shared by the Bride and Groom.

Breaking of the Glass.  The Wedding Ceremony concludes with the Groom breaking a glass under his foot.  This tradition is to remind XX & XX that life holds sorrow as well as joy.  On their wedding day a bride and groom are at the pinnacle of happiness; breaking the glass reminds them of their commitment to each other also in future hard times.  The glass breaking is typically followed by a communal “Mazel Tov” which means “good fortune” in Yiddish and is the equivalent of “Congratulations”

Post # 8
Member
214 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

I love the idea of the four petals turning into a fan!  What a unique way to help your guests stay cool during the ceremony.  I also really like that you included brief explanations of each aspect of the ceremony rather than just assuming that people would understand the significance.  I think your wording does a great job honoring your religion as well as sharing your values as a couple.

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