(Closed) Please, help me out with wording on alcohol.

posted 7 years ago in Food
Post # 3
Member
1940 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

I’ve never heard of the this tradition.  Is it a family tradition or due to your heritge?  Honestly, it does seem a little awkward that you would have alcohol but your guests wouldn’t.  What have other family members who have followed this tradition done?

Post # 4
Member
3482 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2011

I’m not sure why you wouldn’t just pay for your guests’ drinks if there’s going to be such a small number of people there and, as you said, most of them don’t drink anyway.

Post # 5
Member
2373 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2008

I feel it’s bad form to drink something and not offer it to your guests. You may consider purchasing cheaper champagne and passing out a glass to each guest so they can share in your toast after the ceremony. If you have 30 guests you’ll need about 6 bottles of champagne- a large bottle of cristalino is 7/8 bucks.

 As for on the website, I’d just put somewhere very clearly “cash bar” so people know to bring money.

Post # 6
Member
1501 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I don’t understand this tradition, is is a family tradition?

As for having a cash bar you can just write ‘no host bar’, people will understand this means they have to pay.

Post # 7
Member
9056 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2010

I might be against the grain here, but I don’t really have an issue with that.  There’s a cash bar available, and that’s the drink that you purchased from said cash bar.  Even less of an issue to me if it’s more “ceremonial”.

But I’m also thinking that it wouldn’t be super expensive to provide a less expensive sparkling champagne to 30 people. 

Post # 9
Member
9056 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2010

I think if it’s a ceremonial thing, it’s totally cool.  I’ve been to some Scottish events and it’s typical for the head table to be piped in by a bag piper, and then the piper and the host do a toast over a shot of whiskey.  As a guest, I’ve never been like… “Hey, where’s my whiskey shot?”

I think it would be kind of strange for most American guests to have an alcoholic beverage during a ceremony, so they probably won’t feel left out.

Post # 10
Member
1212 posts
Bumble bee

I was thinking of the Whiskey thing too! When it’s part of a ceremony it has NOTHING to do with guests.

Post # 12
Member
7 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: May 2012

At my friends wedding, she provided drinks for the wedding party (which I was in, so it was ok for me), but all of her guests had to purchase alcohol.  I know that a LOT of the guests found it very tacky. 

Post # 14
Member
32 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: June 2008

Hi Fegele,

My surrogate daughter is Ukrainian. I understood your post a bit more once I knew that was your heritage also.

If feasible, at the reception, I would consider having glasses of champagne and sparkling water (perhaps with a splash of juice) passed on a tray for selection by guests for a celebratory toast. It might not end up being too pricey to do one round and would be a nice gesture. 

Are there any other Ukrainian traditions you are incorporating into your day?

Best to you.

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