(Closed) Please help with invitation wording…

posted 8 years ago in Paper
Post # 3
Member
1315 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

Your wording is lovely. Your friend may just have more trad taste than you. I’m DIYing invites etc with a friend, and she thinks all of the invites i show her for inspiration are too casual. She only likes the copperplate/floral ones. Bah….

Go with what feels right for you. You’re inviting people to watch you get married, then eat drink and dance with you. You’re not gonna offend them with the words!

Post # 5
Member
1315 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

No prob. It seems to me like invites are one of the easier ways to be creative and original in your wedding. Go for it!

Post # 7
Member
1315 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

yeah i think i like that better, actually

Post # 9
Member
1315 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

I never heard of it as being tied to the venue, so to speak. I just thought it was to butter up the guests!

Post # 10
Member
714 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

You can always use “request the pleasure of your company” which is the less formal version of “request the honor of your presence.”

Post # 11
Member
705 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

We did:

Together with their families

Twista

and

Mr. Twista

Invite you to a celebration of love, laughter, family and friendship

yada

yada

yada

Snacks, dancing and merriment to follow

Post # 13
Member
1871 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: February 2011

You use the phrase “honor of your presence” vs. “pleasure of your company” in reference to a chapel or other house of worship because you are not God’s “company” in his house. That suggests you and God are equals, like chums. When you enter a house of worship, you are there to honor God, not hang out.

Believe me, I’m not religious, but honestly, if you are having your wedding in a house of worship and don’t want to offend others, I’d recommend that you find a happy medium and either combine the two wordings, or use the traditional wording on the invite and save your “celebration of love, family, and friendship” for the reception card–after all, a religious ceremony in which you take vows is not a celebration.

 

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