POLL!!! Why Do we Still Get Diamond Engagement Rings?

posted 2 years ago in Engagement
  • poll: Why Do We Still Get Diamond Engagement Rings?
    Because it is tradition : (84 votes)
    26 %
    Because of a successful marketing campaign from De Beers : (106 votes)
    33 %
    Because there isn't enough info on alternative stones : (26 votes)
    8 %
    Because they are beautiful and no other stone compares : (108 votes)
    33 %
  • Post # 61
    Member
    2417 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: October 2016

    Diamonds are super durable. I’m wearing my ring for the rest of my life. It’s got to last. Diamonds go with everything. And… I simply don’t want a “fake”. Moissanite didn’t come from a meteor, it’s created in a lab to simulate a diamond. That’s how it’s marketed & that’s largely why it’s purchased.

    I think millennials are used to a quick, fast food, instant access type of world. They want the status of things without the associated cost; it’s kind of their hallmark. Moissanite fits that description. That’s ok. But it’s just not for me. 

     

    Post # 62
    Member
    750 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: August 2017

    jannigirl :  That’s actually incorrect. According to De Beers: “in 2015, the millennial generation spent nearly $26 billion on diamond jewelry in the U.S, China, Japan and India combined.”

    This is quoted from a CNBC report released under 24 hours ago. 

    If anything, millenials spend more money on diamonds than your generation as rings are far more expensive per carat now than a few decades ago. 

    Post # 63
    Member
    750 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: August 2017

    MissMul :  I called 0.5 small because the average sized diamond ring is approx. 1 carat BUT I personally love my ring! I wouldn’t trade it for anything. It is a great cut, a diamond, and a ring we can comfortably afford as up and coming 20-somethings. My center stone is heart shaped and I love that too. 

    But yeah, it is definitely about social legitimation for me and I believe it is for most ppl even if they won’t admit it lol. There is little reason to buy an overpriced diamond if it isn’t about the social implications. The rock itself is common (although marketing would have us believing the opposite) and other rocks are as durable. 

    Post # 64
    Member
    2001 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: October 2017

    MissMul :  beautiful and tradition. I have a sim right now-moissy. It’s pretty but I rather have natural-real.

    Post # 65
    Member
    7899 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper

    It’s tradition, and it’s also a birthstone for some people. 

    Post # 66
    Member
    366 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: July 2019

    I did actually think of opting out of not wanting an engagement ring and just go ahead with the wedding. But then I thought, it’s so pretty and sparkly and it will look so good in pictures. And without it, it will look so bare.

    So… Lol. Yeah, we got an engagement ring.

    I do wish the place I live in had cultured diamonds (lab grown), but the only shop that supposedly carried it, didn’t. And so, we didn’t have a choice but to go with a real diamond.

    But I’m all for lab grown if there was a choice to choose from smile

    Post # 67
    Member
    671 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: September 2017 - Ceremony and Reception: Historic mansion on the water

    Yeah the whole wedding industry is a $50 billion plus revenue producing machine and growing each year.  We’ve been bombared with marketing for decades.  The national average cost for a wedding is approximately $35,000!  

    Diamond engagement rings boomed when DeBeers ran a marketing campaign after the depression when the value of diamonds collapsed.  They obviously were super successful!  So yeah my answer is DeBeers.  We’ve been conditioned to think that the best engagement rings have to have diamonds and the bigger the better.  

    Post # 68
    Member
    3098 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: November 2017

    Actually the history of diamond rings began in the year 1477 with the Archduke of Austria! He started a diamond trend  among european aristocrats and nobility…..

    https://www.americangemsociety.org/en/the-history-of-the-diamond-as-an-engagement-ring

    Those who buy simulants are not immune to marketing influence themselves or they wouldn’t want a large diamond imitation in the first place! Not to mention the Born on a Star ploy to market moissanite for 4x what another created dia simulant (CZ) costs….

    Post # 69
    Member
    169 posts
    Blushing bee

    I chose diamonds because of the durability and look. It is also conveniently my birthstone as well.

    Post # 70
    Member
    1246 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: August 2018

    I wanted something organic and from the earth, not man made, but durable to last a lifetime because I am firmly against the upgrade concept.  An engagement ring and wedding band is a one hit wonder to me.

    Because I care deeply about the ethical implications, we were limited in where to buy and my fiancé ended up spending a TON of money on what would be a “modest” ring for the budget he had for that security on the way the diamond and metal was sourced.  Major draw back.  Still, even if his budget was a quarter of what he spent, I would still opt for the smaller stone on a simple band over a moissanite.  

    I do not judge others for choosing moissanite.  Traditions and mindsets around material objects are always subject to change, even concepts as deeply rooted as the diamond are not immune.  But given the lifetime I currently live in, an organic ethical diamond was what I wanted as the symbol of our lifetime union, and I am lucky enough to have a fiancé who aligned. 

    Post # 71
    Member
    1536 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: September 2015

    I have a diamond engagement ring.  Neither of us wanted another option.

    Whenever I see the deBeers marketing thing being brought up, my reaction is always “So what?”  

    First of all, I thought U.S. is a capitalist country.  We should be celebrating such a successful marketing campaign, right? 

    Second of all, regarding the fact that diamond e-rings are not a very old tradition.  That applies to quite a few other traditions too, that somehow don’t come under fire for this same reason.  For example, Mother’s Day.  The first Mother’s Day was celebrated in the U.S. on May 10, 1908.  Not that much older than diamond rings (1930s) as a tradition, is it?  

    Trick-or-treating as a Halloween tradition didn’t happen in the U.S. until the 1920s/30s either, with the term “trick-or-treating” first appearing in 1927.  

    If diamond e-rings are not “traditional” enough because of the relative youth of the tradition, then Mother’s Day and Halloween aren’t either?

    Thirdly, diamond e-rings are not the only tradition that started or evolved to its current form, due to economic reasons.  Back to the trick-or-treating example above, do we think the candy companies had nothing to do with how it got to where it is today? 

    Also I give you: Thanksgiving.  Full disclosure, the following excerpt is from Wikipedia, but it cites to sources:

    Roosevelt declared the fourth Thursday as Thanksgiving rather than the fifth one. Although many popular histories state otherwise, he made clear that his plan was to establish the holiday on the next-to-last Thursday in the month instead of the last one. With the country still in the midst of The Great Depression, Roosevelt thought an earlier Thanksgiving would give merchants a longer period to sell goods before Christmas. Increasing profits and spending during this period, Roosevelt hoped, would help bring the country out of the Depression. At the time, advertising goods for Christmas before Thanksgiving was considered inappropriate.” 

    Point is, yes the tradition of buying a diamond e-ring in its current form is a result of marketing.  But why do we ever buy anything?  We have to know about it first. And how do we know about it if not (mostly) from marketing? I don’t judge people for what marketing they choose to respond to, whether it be for moissies or diamonds or sapphires or whatever else.  But I do roll my eyes a little when people tell me, with all the gravitas they can muster, about the de Beers thing as if they are schooling me.

    Post # 72
    Member
    7020 posts
    Busy Beekeeper

    mrstodd2bee :  Those who buy simulants are not immune to marketing influence themselves or they wouldn’t want a large diamond imitation in the first place! Not to mention the Born on a Star ploy to market moissanite for 4x what another created dia simulant (CZ) costs…

    This! I said it on another thread, but moissanite owners are STILL falling into the “trap” of the marketing ploy. If they were soo against diamonds, why do they want something that looks (in their misguided opinion) EXACTLY like a diamond but cheaper? Plus a lot of them seem to have a superiority complex about being better than CZ. 

    I’m not a huge fan of simulants. Be it diamond, sapphire or whatever. But if I’m getting a simulant, I’m getting the $10 version of a $10k ring. Not $1000 version. 

    Post # 73
    Member
    9589 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper
    • Wedding: September 2015

    they are the hardest mineral on earth, Millions of years old and absolutely gorgeous. Humans have been coveting diamonds and other precious gems and metals since antiquity, and will never stop IMHO! The first diamond engagement ring was given in the 1400s… back when only royalty had access to the stones.  Diamond jewelry also had a major boom in the late 1800s, when more mines were discovered and normal folk could begin to afford them. Thats why theres so many vintage pieces from that era. The idea that DeBeers invented the diamond engagement ring is lol. Everything on earth is marketed to us… it doesnt have any lasting effect if the product doesnt deliver! They are worth what people will pay for them… and the market for sims just reinforces the demand. 

    That and tradition. Things tend to get momentum and become tradition if its what you saw your mom and grandma do. 

     

    Post # 74
    Member
    2417 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: October 2016

    jellybellynelly : This, exactly. If you just want a “sparkly” ring & you say you want something affordable, get a CZ. $10 and you’re done. You could replace it yearly for less than the inflated cost of the $1000 moissanite.

    And, gosh, do you really think anyone thinks your “3 carat” moissanite is real? No one is believing you spent $30k – $40k on a “perfect” diamond ring. They know it’s a simulant.

    I almost fall over when I read on these boards that these giant simulants look “real”. 

    To each, their own, I guess. 

    Post # 75
    Member
    3098 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: November 2017

    MrsBuesleBee :  +1 diamond rings  have been coveted since the1400’s as I posted above…

    jellybellynelly :  exactly, I also don’t understand the superiority attitude moissanite owners have to cz either. Moissanite has that splintery/wonky cut that gives it away plus the rainbow stain that requires scrubbing…and it’s 4x the cost of cz…C&C’s advertising campaign has obviously been successful!

    jannigirl :  agree, many more people are aware of simulants around them than the wearers want to believe. They hope of course that others believe their large sim is a genuine diamond but that’s not reality. People are generally kind, and will not ask, or will even pretend they are fooled/can’t tell….

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