Possibly TMI…pregnancy and the perineum massage

posted 11 months ago in Pregnancy
Post # 2
Member
2485 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I started around either where you are now or a little bit later. To be honest I didn’t do it religiously – maybe only a couple of times. I had a few grazes and I had an episiotomy. I don’t know if I had done it regularly if I wouldn’t have had it or not. 

Post # 3
Member
435 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

I have read studies that suggest squats are superior to Kegels, and some which suggest Kegels are actually not very useful. My sense is that the medical field may be veering away from Kegels. Any thoughts? (As already, do what your doc says, not some interner random like me- I have just found this topic and the changing views interesting!) 

Post # 4
Hostess
12103 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: May 2014

snowflake8 :  I have no actual experience in this area, never had a baby. I’ll be honest, the whole episotomy and tearing thing is one of my big fears.  That said, everyone I know who’s been there has said it’s not as bad as it sounds (It sucks…just not as bad as you think it will apparently….)

all that said – i found this on Baby-Center – http://www.babycenter.com/404_can-perineal-massage-help-me-avoid-an-episiotomy_1955.bc They say 34 weeks….

Post # 5
Member
1230 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

Most things I’ve read say 34 weeks. I’m almost 29 weeks and want to do this but I’ll probably wait until 34ish weeks because I know if I start now I’m not going to keep it up for 11 more weeks. 

Post # 6
Member
4155 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: January 2017

snowflake8 :  TBH I dont know is Kegels help preventing tears but I know they help prevent urinary incontinence (especially post partum (sneezing and peeing) and later as you get older.. and they help with orgasms too

Post # 7
Member
4155 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: January 2017

snowflake8 :  and I read that starting between 30-35 weeks for the perennial massage is a good time. Thing is you never know if laboir starts at 38 weeks instead of 40 and you started doing the massage at 35 weeks.. then you only have 3 weeks and that may not be enough  massage.. but if you start at 30 weeks you will get a lot more even if baby decides to show up earlier. 🙂

Post # 8
Member
4155 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: January 2017

snowflake8 :  actually Kegels also help with you being able to identify and relax muscles which may be helpful when you feel pain/presure and tense up… for you to be able to control/relax the muscles and let gravity do it’s thing when they let you laboir down so that’s hood and then when you have to do the pushing your muscles will also be strong so I say Kegels are a good thing, I would keep doing them. And start the massage at 30 weeks. That’s  what I would do.

Post # 9
Member
2299 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2015 - Ruby Princess

unfortunately the amount of tearing depends on a lot of different factors. a lot of them are really out of your control. the number one thing that will help minimize tearing is to control the delivery of the head as much as possible. slow and steady so your body can stretch little by little.  For the mother, this means listening to the provider and giving small pushes when asked, and blow through when asked. I’m not certain if there’s research, so I am just speaking anecdotally. tearing also depends on the position of the baby’s presenting parts (including elbows), the speed and control of the pushing/ crowning stage, the length of time it takes to deliver the head. 

this type of controlled second stage is difficult to expect when someone is delivering unmedicated. An epidural is helpful in taking the intensity out of the delivery of the head down to a level where the mom can feel the urge to push, but is not out of control and hard to focus. 

unless you’ve had a baby already, the amount of stretching you are going to be able to accomplish prenatally comfortably is minimal. Your own anatomy and health of your perineal tissues plays a role. Some people just have the kind of perineal skin that is more stretchy, and others more fragile/friable. 

It definitely doesn’t hurt to try, and I wish you the best of luck!

Post # 10
Member
235 posts
Helper bee

snowflake8 :  I just had my first baby a week ago and was also terrified of tearing. My the time I began pushing my epidural was pretty worn off and I did not feel the tear at all. I ended up needing 10 stitches- which I felt a little as she did them, but I was holding my brand new baby so focusing on him was easy. 

The recovery has been a little more painful/annoying than I thought just because it burns when I pee but using a water botttle to wash away urine as you go as been helpful. I feel like you will be so over he moon when your baby comes, the tear will be pretty insignificant!!

Post # 11
Member
251 posts
Helper bee

snowflake8 :  I read from 30 weeks onward. Bouncing on a birthing ball also gets the vaginal area ready for delivery. 

amandajane4949 :  that’s interesting, I thought it was the opposite — that not being able to feel down there after having an epidural meant that you were more likely to tear as you had no control or feeling.

Post # 13
Member
5180 posts
Bee Keeper

snowflake8 :  My friend and I both did the massages, she went without an epidural and I went with one.  I was fortunate to have a smaller baby (I’m also physically smaller than my friend) and didn’t tear.  My friend had a very large baby and tore a bit on the top and bottom.  My recovery was far easier because I didn’t tear.  I don’t know if the epidural really helped or not because I had a smaller baby.

Post # 14
Member
2299 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2015 - Ruby Princess

pearla :  That part has a lot to do with the skill of the delivering provider, in concert with the level of control/ cooperation the mother is able to give. With the intense uges/ body pushing involuntarily, someone who can feel it is going to be wanting to be giving it the beans. At the cruicial moment the widest part of the head emerges, the slower and shorter the pushes are, the better it is on the perineum.

Tearing usually happens with a first baby. It sucks, but second degree tears are the average.  Lots of ice packs in the first few hours, and use that peri bottle. You can also make one with a small water bottle with a sport top. There are things that will make tearing worse. An episiotomy, for instance, vacuum or forceps assisted delivery. Only if the baby is in distress!!!! Routine episiotomies turn my stomach and there’s no reason for them if the baby’s not in trouble. 

Post # 15
Member
7990 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

pearla :  I had an epidural and I could still feel quite a bit, it just wasn’t painful. I could absolutely tell when her head was coming out, her shoulders etc. It’s a ton of pressure. I do feel like the epidural gave me a lot more control over my delivery as I could concentrate 100% on what I was doing and not how much pain I was in.

I never did massage prior to birth but I’m pretty sure my nurse and OB were doing it as I delivered. I had a second degree tear which was really not that bad honestly. I only pushed for like 10 minutes so that probably didn’t really help.

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