(Closed) Pregnancy and Weight Lifting

posted 6 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 2
Member
168 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

I am not pregnant (nor have I ever been) but I would say listen to your body. I follow Amy Updike and she ic currently pregnant and still lifting weights. Maybe reading about her fit-pregnancy will give you some insight. https://instagram.com/fitamysuzanne/

Post # 3
Member
3003 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

View original reply
mindycy1:  Hi! I’m not pregnant anymore (my baby is 8 months old) but I was super active during pregnancy and loved it. I felt like it was good for me, good for my baby, and good for labor. I coach ski racing so I skied 3-5 days/week until 28 weeks (when our season ended). Obviously I was careful not to crash but I skied plenty hard. I also nordic skied and backcountry skied (where you hike up and ski down with no chairlifts). Lots of aerobic exercise! I also did a circuit/TRX class until 28 weeks, it included light weights. I also rode my spin bike, did yoga, swam laps, ran, lifted in the gym, and hiked in the mountains (so, steep ups and downs). Towards the end I did more walking and swimming. But I did do a steep hike with 2,000 feet of elevation gain ten days before I had my son. The only time the midwives cautioned me or seemed concerned was when I when on a trip to Utah and skied at high altitude (10,000 ft), since we are not high where I’m at. I took it very easy and stopped frequently to catch my breath- I felt fine and drank lots of water. The midwives also said that if I hadn’t been so strong and fit I might not have been able to push my son out- I pushed for 3.5 hours and was so exhausted by the end but I could’ve kept going if I’d had to. I also think the “keep your heartrate below 140” advice is outdated, I disregarded that competely. I just listened to my body and I pushed myself hard but not too hard. I’ve been an athlete my entire life and know my body! I stopped running at 18 weeks because it just didn’t feel good and made me have Braxton Hicks. It wasn’t because my belly was big because I was just barely starting to show, it just didn’t agree with me. I guess my advice would be to branch out and vary your workouts so you always have lots of options, like if weight lifting starts to feel sketchy then you have something else. I was glad to stop skiing at 28 weeks because my pelvis did feel….looser or more relaxed or something. Plus I had a nice bump by then and it was hard to put my boots on! Congrats on your pregnancy! Just know your limits and keep your expectations realistic and I think you should be fine!

Post # 4
Member
1391 posts
Bumble bee

I think it is safe. But as with all health questions, consult your doctor. And also a fitness trainer. I love weight lifting (not pregnant). It makes me feel strong and in shape without doing cardio. And I’m sure it will come in handy when it’s time to push…

Post # 5
Member
336 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

I worked out hard my entire pregnancy and my midwives loved how active I was. I would be weary of a doctor who told me not to exercise during a normal, healthy pregnancy.

  • This reply was modified 5 years, 9 months ago by  .
Post # 6
Member
200 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I’ve been told my multiple medical personnel that as long as you can do the ‘talk test’ (speak 3-5 word sentences while working out) and you aren’t holding your breath (can be a problem with lifting  weights) you should be able to do it. And that was just for someone who is moderately fit before pregnancy, not crazy fit like you sound! 

Honestly it’s not very realistic but I’d be wanting another doctor if my doc said that to me! Did he give any evidence based reasoning behind it?? ( ETA: Oops! How bad is it I assumed your doctor’s a man!)

  • This reply was modified 5 years, 9 months ago by  ginmar.
Post # 7
Member
2316 posts
Buzzing bee

From my ACSM guidelines for exercise prescription for special populations….

“There is good evidence that the fetus is able to tolerate maternal exercise in uncomplicated pregnancies and that any fetal responses are transient with no lasting adverse effects [14-21]. Standard tests of fetal well-being have been generally reassuring after short-duration, strenuous exercise in both active and inactive pregnant women [22]. Although adverse events are unlikely to occur in the uncomplicated gestation, healthcare providers who prescribe exercise for pregnant women should be cognizant of all potential complications.”

Post # 9
Member
971 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

I was in the gym squatting the day I went into labour! Granted, by then I had seriously decreased the weight and made sure I always squatted in the rack, I was very active all of my pregnancy. I did stop running around 24 weeks, as it got to be quite uncomfortable. 

Post # 10
Member
3716 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: City, State

View original reply
mindycy1:  I have talked to two different OBs about this– they both said running and lifting is fine, but to really cut back on speed and intensity. They told me that even though I had run a very fast marathon right before getting pregnant (my third in a year an a half– I was in fantastic shape), I should keep my mileage in the 20-30 mpw range and run with my dog (ie, run 9-10 minute miles instead of 7-8 minute miles). It sucked, but I stayed in great shape. I also did a lot more hiking and walking.

As far as lifting, there are  some risks to squats– see here: http://w2.lesmills.com/files/GlobalCentral/Clubs/PregnancyBrochures/BP%20pregnancy%20brochure.pdf, but there are a lot of benefits. I cut my weights back quite a bit and did more reps.

Post # 11
Member
1770 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

Time to find a new doctor!!!

Post # 12
Member
3534 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2015

View original reply
mindycy1:  My crossfit coach miscarried while doing deadlifts (and not even at her max weight).  Listen to your doctor.

Post # 14
Member
139 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

I think that if you had JUST started weightlifting I would stop, but it sounds like you’ve been living this lifestyle for a while! In that case I think its very healthy to continue and slowly cut back (when necessary). I’ve seen woman 7 months pregnant in my spin classes! As long as you listen to your body I think you should be ok.

Post # 15
Member
3716 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: City, State

View original reply
mindycy1:  I just wanted to add two more things– my doctors were worried about me, not my baby. It was never about miscarriage, it was about damage to my pelvic floor and hurting yourself as you have more weight on you. The reason why I was told to cut my speed and distance down was because of concern about the extra weight on my knees, ankles, and hips. Both were fine with other patients running more and faster, but given my track record of not listening to my body and running through the pain, they wanted to bench me. (I deserved it– I had just run a marathon with a stress fracture)

I ended up miscarrying (on the one day of my pregnancy that I did absolutely no excersise– I skipped the gym and running that day) and my doctors were absolutely clear that exercise did not have any impact on losing the baby. 

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