(Closed) Pregnancy Food Question

posted 8 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
1205 posts
Bumble bee

If memory serves, the answer is – for the most part – yes.  Anything you eat goes straight to the baby, so obviously alcohol, medicines, etc. 

I *think* that things like sushi become safe, but nursing brings a whole new dimension to your eating world.  Certain foods that you eat won’t agree with your baby – like the day I realized that eating a couple of handfuls of peanuts made my baby very gassy and upset.  Aside from the obvious, it was trial and error for me.

Post # 5
Member
6572 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: February 2010

my friend didn’t eat anything with peanuts in it all throughout her pregnancy and when nursing because she said that if your baby eats peanuts up to a certain age, it makes them more likely to have an allergy to peanuts. anyone know anything about this? i really love peanut butter!

Post # 6
Member
5823 posts
Bee Keeper

The reason a lot of foods are banned is because they contain bacterias that can easily transfer to your fetus.  Once the baby is out, that risk is nearly non-existent.  You can eat all the forbidden fruits again (like brie, tuna, lunch meat, and raw products).  None of that stuff transfers to your breastmilk (except of course as noted above, things like meds and alcohol).

Post # 7
Member
181 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 2006

if i recall what i read correctly, it’s a little different because not everything passed directly through breastmilk. when you’re pregnant, things go directly to the baby. i do remember that you have to be careful eating gassy foods like cabbage when breastfeeding so that it doesn’t upset baby’s tummy.

Post # 8
Member
7082 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2009

Points up to what BOP says…  Garlic, cabbage and other crucifer vegetables can cause baby stomach upset with breast feeding.

Here’s the info on peanut allergies:

http://www.marchofdimes.com/professionals/14332_1819.asp

Should a pregnant woman eat peanuts or peanut products?
Women who are allergic to peanuts should not eat peanuts or peanut products during pregnancy or at any other time. Studies suggest that women who are not allergic to peanuts can safely eat peanuts during pregnancy (3).

Because peanut allergy tends to run in families, health care providers have been seeking ways to help prevent this allergy in babies from affected families. Until recently, experts recommended that women who aren’t allergic to peanuts but who have a family history of peanut allergy avoid peanuts during pregnancy (3, 4). However, recent studies have found no evidence that avoiding peanuts in pregnancy helps prevent peanut allergies in the child (3, 5).

Peanuts can be healthy food choices for pregnant women. Peanuts are a good source of protein and folate. Folate is the form of folic acid that is found naturally in foods. Taking folic acid before and during early pregnancy helps prevent certain serious birth defects of the brain and spine. The March of Dimes recommends that all women who could become pregnant take a multivitamin containing 400 micrograms of folic acid daily, and make healthy food choices that include foods rich in folic acid.

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Is it safe to eat peanuts while breastfeeding?
If a woman is not allergic to peanuts, she can eat peanuts and peanut products while breastfeeding. There is no evidence that avoiding peanuts during breastfeeding helps prevent peanut allergies in the child (3, 5).

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Is it safe for infants and young children to eat peanuts and peanut products?
Infants and young children who have been diagnosed with a peanut allergy should never eat peanuts or peanut products. Until recently, experts recommended delaying introduction of peanuts and peanut products into the diets of children with a family history of peanut allergy until age 3 (4). Recent studies suggest that this delay does not help prevent peanut allergy (3).

In fact, a 2008 study found a 10-fold greater risk of peanut allergy in children who did not eat peanuts in infancy and early childhood compared to those who ate high quantities of peanuts (6). Additional studies are needed to determine whether eating peanuts in early childhood can help prevent peanut allergy in high-risk children.

Post # 9
Member
626 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2009

From what I’ve read you should still be careful with high-mercury fish.  The risks are higher when pregnant, but mercury can be dangerous if nursing because it can have an effect on an infant or small child’s neural developement.
This goes for young children eating the fish themselves too.

… for that matter it’s something you should watch for your own health too though…

Post # 10
Member
1676 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

I think people should totally get it out there that alcohol is still a no-no if you’re breast-feeding.  Not that I’m an alcoholic or anything… but I was definitely intrigued to find out that not only would I not be drinking for 9 months if I got pregnant, but I also wouldn’t be drinking for A LOT longer than that, since I definitely plan on breast feeding.  I had never realized this before until some of my friends with young babies mentioned it, but now it totally makes sense. 

Also, I’ve definitely heard from friends that eating beans while you’re breast-feeding can have some… umm… messy (read poopy) consequenses with your baby.  Makes me kinda sad b/c I LOVE beans.

Post # 11
Member
7082 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2009

Skibo- you can “pump and dump” if you choose to have a few glasses of wine one night.  Especially if you’ve been pumping already and have breast milk saved to offer the baby.  You’ve got much more flexibility with alcohol while breast feeding than while pregnant 🙂

Post # 12
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

Also, you can buy these breastmilk testing strips to determine if your blood alcohol level is high enough you should abstain from breastfeeding.  🙂

Post # 13
Member
4024 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

You have to be careful with peanuts, just in case your little one has an allergy. Also, onions and other spicy foods like that can spoil your milk. There are some things you will eat, which are perfectly fine, but your baby won’t like it. You’ll just have to see what they like and don’t like!!! 🙂 But, I would drink a glass of wine when I first started breastfeeding because it helps you relax and makes your milk drop. I was also on some meds because my son cracked my tailbone when I delivered him, and those were fine too. If you are really worried about, just talked to the nurses after you deliver, or talk to your dr now!

Post # 14
Member
1676 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

Oh, thanks Mrs. DG and Mrs. Spring!  That’s so good to know!  (Once again, I’m not an alcoholic, I swear!)

@Rosie Girl — your son cracked your tailbone?!  Ouch!  Add that one to the list of things that I never knew could happen during pregnancy (or delivery). 

 

Post # 15
Member
626 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2009

You really can drink while breast feeding.  And almost everything I’ve read has said that pumping and dumping is unneccesary.  Once the alchol is out of your blood it is out of your milk.

Here us info from LLL:

http://www.llli.org/FAQ/alcohol.html

Here is an overview article detailing alcohol and breastfeeding:

http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh25-3/230-234.htm

Here is a exerpt from the article:

“Transfer of Alcohol Into the Milk

When a lactating woman consumes alcohol, some of that alcohol is transferred into the milk. In general, less than 2 percent of the alcohol dose consumed by the mother reaches her milk and blood. Alcohol is not stored in breast milk, however, but its level parallels that found in the maternal blood. That means that as long as the mother has substantial blood alcohol levels, the milk also will contain alcohol. Accordingly, the common practice of pumping the breasts and then discarding the milk immediately after drinking alcohol does not hasten the disappearance of alcohol from the milk as the newly produced milk still will contain alcohol as long as the mother has measurable blood alcohol levels. Peak alcohol levels both in the mother’ s blood and in the milk occur approximately one-half hour to an hour after drinking and decrease thereafter, although there are considerable individual differences in the timing of peak levels and in alcohol elimination rates in both milk and blood (Lawton 1985; Mennella and Beauchamp 1991) . Therefore, lactating women should not nurse for several hours after drinking until their blood alcohol levels have declined again.

The question of whether exposure to alcohol in the mother’s milk can affect an infant in the short or long term has generated much speculation in the medical community. Because alcohol is excreted only to a limited extent in breast milk, many clinicians consider occasional exposure insignificant except in rare cases of intoxication in which the mother of a breast-feeding infant drinks heavily or in which a child is inadvertently fed large amounts of alcohol in a bottle. Contrary to this perception, however, the limited research that exists to date suggests that alcohol administration through the breast milk may affect the infant in several ways, such as altering milk intake and influencing infant behavior and early development and learning. These effects are discussed in the following sections.”

Post # 16
Member
626 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2009

Dr. Jack Newman is qouted by LLL (la leche league – breastfeeding organization).  He is kind of the authority on breastfeeding from what I’ve seen.  (I have friends who practically worship him.. lol..)  He has suggested drinking is perfectly fine in moderation on occasion.  I haven’t ordered his book yet, but here is his website and a link to buy his book:

http://www.drjacknewman.com/

http://www.breastfeedingonline.com/newman.shtml

Books:

http://www.amazon.com/Ultimate-Breastfeeding-Book-Answers-Problem-Solving/dp/0307345580/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1267813500&sr=8-1

http://www.amazon.com/Dr-Jack-Newmans-Guide-Breastfeeding/dp/1554683491/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1267813500&sr=8-2

 

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