Pregnant and quitting, need help with email

posted 6 months ago in Career
Post # 2
Member
14939 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

 “Due to personal medical reason…. I’ve decide to resign and focus on my health, etc”  all you have to say is medical reason and people are typically decent enough not to probe. 

Post # 3
Member
1460 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2018

Should this be a conversation you have on the phone or in person rather than by email? I agree with pp you don’t need to elaborate on what your medical reasons are, but to me it seems more professional to not do this by email. Seems kind of like texting a break-up…

Post # 4
Member
3270 posts
Sugar bee

I also would call. I would also offer to help train your replacement and be available to answer any questions.

Post # 5
Member
6566 posts
Bee Keeper

My work requires written notice, as have all my past jobs, so doing an email is pretty standard. 

I agree with pp about just saying medical reasons. As long as you give enough notice I think that’s fine. 

Post # 6
Member
2477 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2017

What the first poster said. Just ensure you’re going about it according to the company policy. I couldn’t quit my job through a simple email. The police and my department would be at my door. 😂

Post # 7
Member
1516 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2017

Agree with pp who said email that references medical reasons. I don’t think you should offer to train a replacement given how stressful that is and you already work in a not great environment (chemicals and physical labor) for your situation. 

Post # 8
Member
14939 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

Agree with PP about calling/talking to your direct supervisor first, and then follow up with the email to coworkers/boss as a farewell email.  Here’s an example of one I received recently.  

—————

As some of you may know, I’ve decided to resign due to personal reasons.

It was not an easy decision to leave the wonderful community here at XYZ and I’m grateful for the career opportunities I’ve had here and the amazing colleagues I’ve had the pleasure to work with. 

Please keep in touch via LinkedIn, my personal email, or text/call at XYZ. 

I wish you all continued success in your careers and personal endeavors, and am hopeful we will have the opportunity to work cross paths again in the future.

Thank you all for making my time here at XYZ such a great experience.

Post # 9
Member
6434 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: February 1997

I’d talk to the director in person. Then I’d submit a letter of resignation and give the required notice. Only then would I email other coworkers. Agreed that you do not need to say anything other than “a personal medical reason” and if anyone is so impolite as to pry, simply tell them that you’re not comfortable discussing it. 

Post # 10
Member
1516 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2017

I just don’t agree with people advising to talk first. I’m always afraid of how things can get twisted, so it is best to just do it in writing and document it. 

Post # 11
Member
47188 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

I suggest you also make sure you are aware of any benefits you might be entitled to, by staying employed on sick leave or taking a leave of absence. Obviously this depends on your individual circumstances, but at my workplace you could be off on sick leave with full pay and benefits, until you either felt better or were eligible for maternity leave to start.

Post # 12
Member
1569 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2018 - Location

julies1949 :  yes I was thinking the same. You may qualify for short or long-term sick leave which could buy you time until you’re ready to announce the pregnancy and resign.

I don’t know though. Depends on the employer/industry. I would definitely want to have something in writing though. You can always have a conversation with your boss after to “clear the air” a bit. Good luck 🙂

Post # 13
Member
6442 posts
Bee Keeper

I would personally talk to the director in person not just quit via email. Depending on how long you’ve worked there you may have a very good relationship with this person and I think it would be ruder to send an email.  I also think that you may want to check how soon you can quit after taking sick leave.  

Post # 14
Member
3736 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2019 - City, State

Depending on your relationship with the director, I would recommend calling first and then follow up with an email. At my work place, this is common practice. We require notice in writing, but the phone call is a courtesy to the employees manager. You don’t have to tell them specifics, you can state “for personal/medical reasons”.

Congratulations on your pregnancy! All the best to you and your growing family!

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