(Closed) PSA: La-a is not a name

posted 6 years ago in Names
Post # 3
Member
1629 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

I agree. Everytime I see this or the “Orangejello, Lemonjello” story I get so annoyed. It’s a racist urban legend.  Yes, there are some names that are funny sounding in English because they are from another language (I knew a Nimrod growing up, it is a fairly common Hebrew name pronounced “Nim-road”), but a lot of these are urban legends.

Post # 4
Member
50 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@MrsJazzy:  actually, yes. This is real. I know of at least TWO kids that have been saddled with this name (my mom is in education, and also travels extensively doing teacher workshops).

So are the the names Orangejello (“Oh-ranj-ello”) and (his twin brother) Yellowjello (“Ye-lanj-ello”).

@bearlove it’s not racist- we keep a running list of the craziest names, and all races are represented on that list. It’s not always a race thing. Sometimes it is a “crazy people” thing.
Never underestimate the need of undereducated people and their desire to be unique. 

Post # 5
Member
9824 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

I’ve heard of some strange names, but some of the ones people were insisting they had heard firsthand on the other thread made me go “Hmmm… really?”

 

Post # 6
Member
494 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I was surprised to find out that these are urban legends!  I know a nurse who has told me both the Orangejello and Ladasha story and made it seem like she was there and witnessed these names.  Turns out she was just lying and I don’t know why?!  

Post # 7
Member
1830 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: November 2014

@AshaP:  I want to say that if there are actually kids named La-a, then their undereducated “unique”-seeking parents heard the story and instead of laughing, thought to themselves “Hey, that’s an awesome name for my future child!”

And so continues the cycle of ROFL.

Post # 9
Member
9824 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

I’ve heard the old racist urban legend of the black mother who wanted to name her daughter “Vagina”, I’m sure someone out there would insist they have heard that firsthand as well. That’s how urban legends work.

Post # 10
Member
50 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@pharmy:  honestly, I think you may be right. They are fairly young- I want to say in the 6-8 year age range. My mom gets her list of strange names from the teachers (usually during their complaint/question answer time-teachers are always trying to figure out how to pronounce the names of their kids, and how to deal with parents that get mad when they don’t know how to).

Post # 12
Member
1359 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

@AshaP:  So the teachers could have been just using it as an example, right? Your mom didn’t actually meet any of these kids?

Post # 14
Member
726 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

@pharmy:  I agree. I think it wasn’t real until someone heard it and thought for some reason that it would be a great name!

And of course, if I ever ran into this name, I’d know exactly how to pronounce it and wouldn’t miss a beat when doing so. 

Post # 15
Member
1115 posts
Bumble bee

Christ on a bike, one of you believers better turn up a birth certificate or something because this is getting old.

Post # 16
Member
7609 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

I kept wondering why people were getting so worked up about this on the other thread.  Since I’ve never left my sweet little province for more than a few vacations, I can’t possibly claim to know that someone else from a different part of the world is wrong or lying about something.  I have to assume that not every bee on here who said they’ve heard of a La-a IRL is a liar or has been lied to!  Maybe (like someone else already said) it started out as a myth and then someone liked it?  *shrug*  I’m a teacher who – after seeing some ridiculous made-up names – believes that somewhere out there, there is a little girl named La-a.

The topic ‘PSA: La-a is not a name’ is closed to new replies.

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