(Closed) Pumping instead of “breast”?

posted 7 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
1498 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

I think its a great option to try out and I’m sure your OB would agree.

I tried to breast feed but simply couldn’t. I ended up buying a cheap pump so that I could get as much of my own milk out as possible to supplement formula. (I went with a cheaper one because I knew I’d only be able to use it for a few days to a couple of weeks.) You can check Target and Walmart as they sometimes put their breast pumps on sale so you could buy one for the cost of renting for a couple months.

Post # 5
Member
1498 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

You can mix the two together but it isn’t necessary to do so. The formula and the milk won’t change the properties of each other or anything like that.

My little guy had no problem at all. I had read about nipple confusions and difficulties going back and forth between breast milk and formula but in all honesty, my son just wanted to eat and he didn’t care where it came from or how it was mixed up. I know this isn’t true for everyone but for me, it worked out just fine.

Post # 6
Member
7524 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2010

With my second daughter (born this last summer) I pumped almost exclusively.  I initially did have to regular-breastfed until my milk supply came in.  I rented a great pump from the hospital I delivered in (apx $30/month) and pumped exclusively after that initial first week.  I did this because I did not enjoy the regular breastfeeding experience that I had with my first daughter.  Also, with my first child, I had difficulty producing enough milk and wanted to be sure of what I was producing for the second baby. 

Now to be fair, I have only nursed my babies while I was on maternity leave and went to formula when I returned to work- at 9-10 weeks.  BUT, something is better than nothing, and I am happy with the decision I made to breastfeed by pumping- even if it was only the first couple months.

Post # 7
Member
3771 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: December 1999

I think that is a really great option. The Symphony is a great pump, I rented one while I was on maternity leave to see if Boyfriend or Best Friend would work out before I bought a pump. Any little bit of breast milk you give (especially in the first weeks) is great. The hospital will also have pump you can use right after you have baby so it can stimulate your supply while you are still there.

Post # 8
Member
607 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

There was a post on Hello Bee that talked all about exclusively pumping. It’s worth looking up, I think (she exclusively fed pumped breast milk though). I would say you are probably better renting a hospital grade one than buy a cheap one, since I think they are much better at getting the most milk (from what I’ve heard from friends, no kids yet for me). I do think it’s hard to keep up your supply that way, though– another reason to just rent vs buying the pump.

Post # 9
Member
6830 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

Hello I pumped exclusively my son was born 7 weeks early and was in the NCIU unit for the first month of life.  My milk didn’t come in fast enough and never really picked up.  I also had issued with him latching.  I pumped and also did formula.  He got my milk until he was 4 months and even with that over half of the milk was formula. 

I could never mix the two because when I tried he would not drink it. So it had to be one or the other…

Post # 11
Member
921 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

@Goldilocks1107:  Mrs. Bee pumped (only) with Charlie. You should ask her! 🙂  She has written tips on pumpings (and the whys and why nots).

Post # 12
Member
419 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

i thought the same thing you did and i ended up breastfeeding and then becoming too sore/mad/felt like a cow to do it so i started pumping. lemme tell ya….. breastfeeding is way easier than having to pump. it was so annoying to be hooked up to a machine a million times a day. it’s easier to have a baby hanging off you than to have to carry all that garb around. you have to think about it everywhere you go and everything you do you have to make sure you have all your equipment so you can pump as much as your baby eats.

if you’re totally against breastfeeding i would just save yourself some trouble and bottle feed. in my personal opinion (and experience) it’s just easier and a lot less stressful if you do ONLY one or the other (breastfeed or formula bottle feed). plus, pumping is supposed to supplement breastfeeding so you have to work twice as hard and be on the pump longer and more often to get your supply up to meet your baby’s needs. 

also!!! when i started to supplement w/ formula i would give him breastmilk first and then when he would finish that i’d give him formula so that way if he got full he would have had breastmilk first cause that sh*t is like liquid gold when you have to pump for it! excuse my lang.

p.s. formula is really expensive. i didn’t know how much it was until AFTER i had Liam.

Post # 13
Member
419 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

i had a rental symphony too and it worked great

Post # 14
Member
3175 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

In my experience, pumping is waaaay more work than traditional BFing. I had planned to exclusively pump, but, when the time came, I was just overtired and overwelmed & I ended up breastfeeding and loving it.

As one of the other bees suggested, I would look into renting a hospital grade pump if you plan on pumping regularly. The quality really makes a huge difference, and you won’t be out as much money if you change your mind.

Good luck!

Post # 15
Member
419 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

sorry i’m posting again…. but i just wanted to say one more thing!!! as soon as i stopped breastfeeding and feeding Liam formula he slept through the night…. and hasn’t woken up in the night since.

i have heard OVER and OVER when moms breastfeed their babies also co-sleep with the parents. this creates a vicious sleeping pattern. baby rolls over in the middle of the night not because she’s hungry but because she know’s her mom is there and she feels like nursing for comfort. then the babies can’t nap alone cause then when they stir they start looking for their mom and then realize they’re alone and get upset. then, the baby refuses to sleep anywhere alone! then, when babies start to realize they can nurse when they’re not hungry, but when they feel sleepy or want to be soothed their mommys are the only ones who can do that if they won’t take a paci. can you imagine? 

i could go on and on. there is so much to say

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