(Closed) Pup vs Child the difficult question……..

posted 6 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
4439 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: January 2013 - Harbourfront Grand Hall

SIL needs to put her foot DOWN.  

Their dog is old enough to know basic commands and if they work with the dog and research introducing a pet to a new baby there’s NO reason the dog needs to be re-homed.

Were they planning on or TTC when they adopted?  If so and he felt this way they NEVER should have gotten a dog.  

I would seriously leave Fiance if he wanted to get rid of my cat.

Post # 4
Member
1765 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

My personal opinion is that a lot of parents let their very young children “play” with their pets when they are way way too young. A friend of ours had a german shepard, and they would let their 2 year old play with him freely. The child would commonly pull on the dogs ears, often times hurting him without realizing. Well the child was using the dogs ear to pull himself up and the dog took a nip at him, clearly just trying to say “hey that hurts!”. The child was unharmed. So they immediately got rid of the otherwise very gentle dog. I personally would not let my child even be in that situation. Once the kids are older and they can understand that the dog feels pain, etc then they won’t be yanking on the dog. Often times, the reason dogs nip at kids is because they don’t like what the child is doing. Kids will often poke and pull on a dog and they don’t even realize they are causing discomfort.

However… some dogs are just simply not suitable to be around kids under 12. If you’re planning on having kids, that is something to consider when you are getting a dog. If you’re adopting a rescue, make sure that he does well with children during their tempermant testing. If you are getting a puppy, make sure you socialize them around kids. 

Post # 6
Member
4439 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: January 2013 - Harbourfront Grand Hall

@pecanpie:  +1, children definitely need supervising when “playing” with pets of any kind.

Post # 7
Member
1621 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I would hope this never happens, but it did happen in our family.  When my baby brother was born, our family dog (who had been with us for 3 years) backed my mom into a corner while she was holding him, snarling and growling and nipping at her.  My parents decided after it happened twice that they had to re-home him.  It was horrible for all of us.  I still wonder what else could have been done in that kind of situation.

Post # 9
Member
2891 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

I am VERY choosy about dogs to prevent this problem. I would rather have no dog than the wrong dog. I would start socializing that puppy around small kids now. I would definitely have treated it like a DOG all along. Many people ruin their pets by treating them like children. I used to foster and this was the #1 problem we faced : ( Not making judgements here because she may already be treating him like a dog. I would get the dog used to sleeping in the place that will always be his. I love laundry or mudrooms for this. I have seen serious problems because the dog was assigned the guest room then it became the nursery and Fido was relegated to the kitchen. I would put the puppy’s food and water dish in an area of limits to this future baby. I always kept it in the laundry room with the cleaning supplies and gated off. The more prep work you do now means the less drastic change the dog will have to face then.

My comment about the wrong dog is because not every dog has the temperment to live well with children. Heck I fostered a dog that had so many wires crossed she just needed to be put down. She would atttack herself! She had major issues and the vet recommended euthanasizing her but I worked for a no kill shelter so no matter how many times she bit someone….yeah a life in a crate. Sad! Many dogs love children though so fingers crossed that this puppy has the right temperment.

Post # 10
Member
3170 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

It would all depend on the situation and what happened. If my dog nipped out of fear I don’t know that I would automatically get rid of him. If he really bit my child there would be some steps we would take to make sure it didn’t happen again (traiining, not allowing him close to our child). I wouldn’t get rid of my dog unless I feared that it may happen again. We have taken the steps now to make sure we are comfortable that it won’t happen though.

We are constantly tugging on their ears, messing with them when they eat, pulling on their skin. When we play I always get my hands close to their mouths to see if they would bite and they never do.

Post # 11
Member
3885 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

The vast majority of times, a responsible pet owner can introduce a new baby into the home and have nothing but good experiences. 

My neighbors have two massive rotties (I have one myself, too) and two little girls, around 2 and 4; they’ve had two rotties for ages and when their older one died, had a new one within 2 months. These are rescue dogs, too, and from pretty abusive backgrounds.  Those dogs are very protective of the girls, but they’re also just gentle as lambs with the girls. The girls ride those dogs like little ponies, and the only problems that have ever happened have been the expected things like clumsy dog accidentally steps on little girl’s foot.  No nipping, growling, snapping, anything. 

Train your dogs to obey you; teach them that outside is for playing and roughhousing and inside is not; do some basic dog-and-kid-proofing (like buying dog toys that are not attractive to kids, such as Kongs, so there’s no fighting over toys, same with kid toys that are not attractive to dogs); and teach the kids that dogs are to be treated kindly, and you won’t have any problems at all. 

And if there is an accident— because accidents will happen— look at what happened before knee-jerking into getting rid of the dog.  If the dog nips at the baby because play got out of hand and too energetic, that’s a very different scenario than if the dog nips at the baby asleep in the bassinett.  

ETA: many animal rescues and shelters do temperament testing for a small fee. It might be well worth the time and money to have a temperament test done on a pet, to see if he already has any tendencies like food aggression that you need to be aware of. A food aggressive dog isn’t automatically a killer; it just means as both a pet owner and a parent, you need to know how doggie is likely to react if someone puts a hand in his dish, and if that’s a negative reaction, then plan around it and don’t let baby get into a situation where he’s playing with the dog dish while doggy is eating.

Post # 13
Member
2440 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

I’m planning on getting a dog prior to TTC. We’ve always had pets which have known their boundaries with baby’s and children, so I’m sure so long as we don’t choose an overly aggressive breed, training pup/doggy and baby to live harmoniously shouldn’t be a problem.

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