(Closed) Puppy Search

posted 8 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
2214 posts
Buzzing bee

Look on petfinder.com!! I found my black mini poodle on there and he’s the sweetest guy ever!

Post # 4
Member
4385 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

Depending on where you are in Canada I can recommend a good breeder! We got very lucky with our welsh terrier.

Post # 5
Member
2703 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

i agree with BOSTONBEE! use PETFINDER!!!!

Post # 6
Member
2144 posts
Buzzing bee

You will not find a reputable breeder for any of these hybrid “breeds.” At best, they are hobby breeders who just love their dogs and think it’s a quick way to make some money, and at worse, as you have found, are the puppy mills. Check on craigslist for people giving away dogs they cannot keep, check petfinder.com, and never ever buy a dog and have it shipped on a plane. If it’s too far for you to go check out where they are being raised and the parents of the dogs, it’s just not a good idea. I’m glad you are avoiding the puppy mills though even though these puppies steal your heart! It’s definitely better in the long run for you. Also, just check out your local animal shelters and rescue organizations! You never know what you may find.

Post # 7
Member
91 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: November 2010

Please rescue!!  Petfinder is a fantastic place to find all sorts of breeds/mixes/mutts.  I’ve not personally come across anyone selling Hybrids, also known as MUTTS (and I love mutts, I have one!), that was not a backyard breeder/puppymill.  Those people breed to make money, end of story.  Breeding is done to better the breed as a whole, not make money.  If you have your heart set on a purebred, there a thousands of breed-specific rescues all over the U.S. and Canada (you can check with the breed club-google them!-for reputable rescues).  Please look there first before going anywhere else.  You can save a life!

Post # 8
Member
979 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

Go for a mutt!  They will have fewer genetic health problems and you will have a dog that looks like nobody else’s!

Post # 9
Member
4466 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

Agree with above posters.  There are no “reputable breeders” for these “designer dogs.”  Please consider adopting a dog, even if it isn’t one of the more popular breeds.

I echo the suggestion of petfinder.com

 

Post # 10
Member
130 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

I agree with everyone who says to adopt-After adopting my first one in college I vowed to never buy a dog again. Designer breeds can have a lot of health issues because of their limited gene pools and there are so many wonderful puppies and young dogs that are up for adoption. Petfinder, local shelters, and even Petsmarts run adoption days. Good luck finding your puppy.

Post # 11
Member
1288 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2010 - Indiana Memorial Union

If you have your heart set on a poodle, check out the local poodle club or rescue. The club will have links to reputable breeders. The rescue will obviously have rescued dogs 🙂 Petfinder is also a really great tool.

Post # 12
Member
2607 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

I second (or would that be fifth?  seventh?  hehe) checkinging Petfinder.com if you have your heart set on a mixed breed.  Typing “Morkie” won’t get you very far, however, since these aren’t actual breed.  If you want a yorkie mix for example, then search for yorkshire terrier. It will bring up both purebreds and mixes of that breed.  You can further narrow your results by age, gender, etc.

If you’re looking for a purebred, petfinder.com is still a wonderful option.  Or, you can look for reputable breeders.  If you need more information on how to finder a responsible breeder, just ask I’m sure you’ll get all kinds of info!

Good luck with your puppy search!

Post # 13
Member
219 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

Just as a heads up, you will not find a reputable breeder who has any of these “designer breeds” for sale. There are no standards for these animals because they are not real breeds — there are no standardized outcomes as far as character or physical traits, and as a result there is no testing done to make sure you are getting a healthy, balanced, wellbred dog from healthy, balanced, well bred parents. The people breeding these dogs are often not much better than “puppy mills” — they certainly do not have the wellbeing of the animals they are producing or the families that are buying them in mind. It is all about the bottom line.

If you really want a designer breed, check Petfinder out, as others have mentioned. Adoption is the only responsible way to go about getting a designer breed, IMO.

If you want to go to a breeder, settle on a purebred, and find someone who does genetic testing, has health guarantees, and who only breeds titled animals. A good “red flag” that suggests the breeder is unethical, is if they are pumping out multiple litters a year.

Just make sure you do your homework, and you will find a good match 🙂

Post # 14
Member
555 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

Here’s the thing that I don’t understand, I know that puppy mills are terrible because of health issues but these animals are born, don’t they deserve a good home too? Is it because the money is going to further these people in doing what they’re doing when they shouldn’t be doing it? That makes sense I guess? I just feel bad for the dogs, it’s kind of like just because you were born you’re not worthy. Mind you I’m the same girl who literally saved her pup from being put down at the pound so I’m a big believer in pound puppies especially older ones. Mine was 1 and no one wanted her because she wasn’t a puppy and she was literally a day away from being put down, it’s shocking because she’s the BEST dog ever, so good and great with kids. She’s just a little on the large size (about 80lbs).

I personally think there are some shady adoption agencies out there too. My mom and brother wanted a dog from the pound and when it was available there was an adoption agency there at the same time, rather than backing out seeing that the dog had someone who wanted it to have a home they out bid her then told her she could pay $400 for it via the agency. REALLY? How is that helpful? You’re going to take on an animal that needs to be fed and try and find it a home when someone wanted it? That’s wrong too.

Post # 15
Member
219 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

@ Cricket… Your thought process is correct. As someone who works in animal rescue, I know that with the way animals are treated (as being completely disposable pieces of property), it is inevitable that tons of wonderful and deserving animals are going to die every year. Do I feel bad for puppy mill dogs? Yes, of course I do. But I also know that no matter what you do, dogs and cats are still going to die needlessly.

The difference? When you adopt, you give money to an institution that is making an effort to find a SOLUTION to pet overpopulation. When you “rescue” a puppy mill dog, you are not only sentencing pound puppies to death, but you are also funding the creation of more puppies, and consequently extending the terrible cycle of pet disposal as opposed to helping stifle it.

It is a sad and bitter reality to swallow, but until we as a country can shift the paradigm on how we treat animals, it unfortunately will always be there 🙁

Post # 16
Member
219 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

And if there was really an “outbidding” going on — which there shouldn’t have been, because shelters and rescues partner, they don’t “sell” animals — you should report it to your Health Department. Was this shelter city funded?

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