(Closed) Puppy separation anxiety

posted 5 years ago in Pets
Post # 5
Member
17 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: November 2014

Get another puppy to keep her occupied if possible. 

Post # 6
Member
5958 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2018

@nottoocool4school:  Ok. Cool.  11 weeks is still really little, super extra baby time, you’re mom, which is the be all end all for her, being away from you is a threat to her safety.  Showing her that being separated is ok, and that you’ll always come back is important, I know you have to work, so make the most of the time you are home with close time, small distances between you and time away. Never let her out because she cries, and be patient and consistent.

Blue heelers are smart and high energy, twice daily walks and productive play time where you challenge her high intellect will also keep her from stressing out, and build a good bond between you two.  

Good luck!  

Post # 7
Member
739 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

It’s one of those things that just take time. I have a beagle who took a while to get used to being left alone, even in her crate. One thing that helped was covering her crate with a blanket. It made her feel much more safe, and don’t worry, she won’t suffocate! 

I disagree with PP, in my experience its better to only have one puppy at a time so that they bond to you instead of to one another. 

Post # 9
Member
296 posts
Helper bee

This is pretty normal, and in my personal experience, my puppy grew out of this. I didn’t let him out when he cried….or acknowledged him at all UNTIL he stopped crying. I wanted him to know it was ok to be alone and I would be back. I would practice leaving and coming back on the weekends since you have such a busy schedule during the week. It definitely worked for me. Also, I wouldn’t make a big deal when you leave. I don’t know your routine, but if you are hugging and kissing them before you leave—that’s an issue. Once I stopped doing that, it just seemed like one day….he stopped whining. Also, if it’s at all possible to get your puppy LOTS of exercise before you leave, that would definitely help! My older boxer still has some issues with me leaving, but when I make sure he’s had some time to do boxer burns before I leave so that he’s too tired to care about my absence 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

@starz88962:  Are you referring to litter syndrome? I have two dogs (1.5 years and 8 months) and their anxiety level is almost non-existent since I crate them together when I leave, but they are not from the same litter….and they both lay all over me when I’m home. LOL. I was always told it wasn’t good to get dogs from the same litter at the same time because they will bond with each other instead of the owner and it’s extremely problematic. I’m just curious if that’s what you were talking about.

 

 

 

Post # 10
Member
1902 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

As others have said, I think set up a routine for when you leave so that your puppy knows this is just a normal thing. Don’t fuss over your puppy when you’re leaving, otherwise she will think there’s something to be worried about. Barely even talk to her when you put her away – just put her in the cage, give her some food and walk away. Also, when you get home, don’t make a fuss – don’t even go to see her straight away. Part of what makes a puppy/dog feel comfortable is seeing that you’re confident in their safety. If you come home and instantly run to puppy and start cuddling her, she’ll think “Wow! I must have only just survived something horrible for her to be fussing over me so much!” Whereas if you come home, put away your handbag, get changed, make a cup of tea, then let her out, she will realise that going in and out of the crate is part of the normal routine.

Also, don’t run to her when she’s crying – that just encourages her to think she’s in trouble. If you must go to her, walk over slowly, don’t look at her, keep your shoulders back and head up, and do a really big, exaggerated yawn. That’s basically dog language for “There’s nothing here to be worried about. I’m in control.”
As others said – when you’ve got the spare time, practice leaving her alone for increasing amounts of time so she gets used to it.

Also, if you can, get your hands on some books by Martin McKenna – he was basically raised with a pack of dogs, so he’s got some pretty good ideas on managing behaviour dogs. I’ve heard Cesar Milan has some good material on dog behaviour too – believe me, you’ll be glad you bought them!

Post # 11
Member
1431 posts
Bumble bee

@nottoocool4school:  HThe only thing I can add that I haven’t seen posted already is leaving a worn shirt in her crate when you leave. I heard it is comforting if they can smell your scent. Hang in there, I promise it gets easier! Just make sure you know all the things NOT to do when crate training because I think that is most important to get right while she is young so she will be crate trained properly= less stress on the dog. 

Post # 12
Member
739 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@angustia:  Litter syndrome can be problematic when you get two puppies from the same litter, but you can also run the risk of two puppies from different litters bonding to each other instead of bonding with you… I’m talking about getting two really young puppies (2-3 months old), not necessarily several months apart. I haven’t experienced this myself, but I’ve just heard about it through people at work. 

Post # 13
Member
1607 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

@nottoocool4school:  I rescued my dog and he had severe anxiety issues as an adult dog. Solved it by crating over a long process with treats, petting, etc. Sitting next to crate and just showing him its not painful or hurting him to be near or inside it. Then after he went inside a couple of times I would close the door but not latch it. Each time letting hime back out before he started crying. Each time I waiting a little longer. Then I would move back – then after a couple times I would stand. Each time I would come back to the crate and let him out right away. I never gave him a treat when I let him out – only when I put him IN the crate.

Eventually I worked up to getting outside the door and coming right back in. Then outside the door and going down the apt. bldg stairs then coming right back. Each time I would go a little further and be gone a little longer. Each time I would come back and let him out. He just needed to associate the fact that just because I was leaving – didn’t mean I wouldn’t ever return. And for dogs, judging time isn’t a string suit so you have to work in small increments at first.

* Slowly work up from just going into the crate to leaving the house for short periods of time.

* Give a treat when you put him *into* the cage so the reward is establishing the pattern you want. (If you do it when you get home he will want you home even worse)

* Take your time with this – do this process over a few weeks. But puppies learn quick, so once you have him trained to not get nervous about your leaving he will be good to go.

Good Luck!

Post # 14
Member
296 posts
Helper bee

@starz88962:  Oh ok. Just wondering. Thanks for clarifying that for me. I’ve only recently heard of litter syndrome and though that’s what you were referring to 🙂

Post # 15
Member
1293 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2018

@nottoocool4school:  Would you consider doggy daycare for maybe one day a week? Also, many doggy daycares offer “puppy visits” or hour long walks. It would help to break up the day for your furbaby so that she didn’t miss you as much.

Our little guy hates the crate too, and he is very distraught when he can’t see both of us. If Fiance and I are in different rooms, he will run back and forth to check on us both and make sure we haven’t moved. Boxers seem to be famous for separation anxiety, so I’m not sure if his will get better or not. However, like Nona said, we spend as much time with his as possible when we are home and we make the very best of the time we do have.

Post # 16
Member
1106 posts
Bumble bee

We had about a week to crate-train our baby before we had to get into the full swing of our schedules.  We would do short periods of time with her in the crate and if she did not whine for 10 minutes then we would let her out, play with her, etc.  Then we were able to work up to half an hour and while it sucks, even if she whines as you leave, you just have to keep moving.  Our puppy does not like a blanket, either.  There can barely even be anything on top of her crate! And we’ve had her for 4 months now.

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