(Closed) Puppy won’t stop biting and I’m losing my mind… help!

posted 8 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
175 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

If she starts to bite, try to get her to bite on a toy instead of your arms and legs.  Also, if she does bite you, yelp like she would if she got hurt.  She’ll understand that yelping as pain better than yelling like a human.

Good luck!!

Post # 4
Member
175 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

Also, when she bites and after you make the yelp, get up and walk calmly out of the room for a minute or two.  Then come back calmly and continue loving on her.  She’ll start to understand that her biting is not ok.

Post # 5
Member
8353 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: March 2011

I would start by triaining her not to jump on you. Tell her down in a firm voice and make her sit until she calms down. When she bites, tell her no in a firm voice and make her sit until you want her to get up. Do not reward her with treats, toys, petting, etc., until she is behaving the way you want her to.

I also suggest some behaviorl training. PetSmart offers classes that would give you the tools to train her with.

Post # 6
Member
984 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

Our puppy is doing this as well and it’s driving me batty. We have another dog so they bite/play with each other so the problem is that he doesn’t realize there is a difference between dogs and humans. We’ve gotten into the habit of pinching/nipping him on the back of the neck whenever he starts biting us, just like a mother dog. He’s starting to get the picture and he’s biting us a lot less now.

Post # 7
Member
5147 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

She’s trying to play with you like she would play with her littermates.

She needs to learn that teeth on human skin is not acceptable.

When she bites you, say “UNT!” and then shun her. After a few minutes, give the her attention again and urge her to take a toy or chew-stick. Praise her lavishly when she takes the toy/chew-stick.

Post # 8
Member
2195 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: January 2013

I remember this stage in our puppies’ lives SO WELL, because it’s frustrating as all get-out!  Especially with our last dog, he didn’t respons to any yelling, shunning, using a squirt gun, or any other form of punishment we tried.  We were all going insane.  I think everyone has made good suggestions about what to do when she is actually biting.  But I just want to remind you that soon she will stop and you’ll just have a wonderful pup, then dog, who has none of those nonstop biting/chewing tendencies!  I believe it’s all over by about 7 months.  Our sociopathic devil puppy turned into the most sedate, loving adult dog. 

Post # 9
Member
105 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

It is really important that you have LOTS and LOTS and chewtoys around.  It’s not just squeky toys either.  You can go to petsmart or wherever and buy bags of 50 rawhide sticks that are perfect puppy size.  We have dozens all over the house, yes it’s pain in the a$$ to step on them everywhere, but it is necessary.  Every time Jacque (our 16 week cocker spaniel) goes to nip or bite, I smack him on the head (I would say medium hard), say NO, and shove a rawhide in his mouth.  He would happily chew it for a while, and then 30 minutes later we would have to repeat the procedure.  It takes a long, long time, but have lots of alternatives for the puppy to chew on and it will stop.

Biting is a big thing and I suggest getting it under wraps soon.  Sorry to be so serious, but I think well trained dogs start young.

Post # 10
Member
4 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: April 2012

@DecemberBride:

Chew toys and yelping totally helps.  Screaming at the puppy won’t.  They don’t understand that.  Now is the time (while the puppy is young and little) to snap her into shape.  I am not sure what breed you have, but you may want to look up forums for the breed.  Labs, German Shepherds, virtually all breeds have one and you will get a lot of great info from other owners.  Also, check out this site— it’s about the various developmental stages of growing puppies.  It’s pretty spot on and really helps prepare for fear stages, dominance stages, etc.  It was soooo insightful when I got my first pup.  I was clueless.  And lastly… sign up for training.  It’s never too early to start.  It’s a marginal cost when compared to having to replace all your shoes, a couch, etc.  Good luck.  Laughing

Post # 11
Member
5147 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

You can go to petsmart or wherever and buy bags of 50 rawhide sticks that are perfect puppy size.

 

I personally advise against rawhide. Rawhide isn’t digestible, and large peices can cause intestinal blockages. Also, there are no import regulations for rawhide, so it can be imported from China after being dipped in bleach and other chemicals and is considered “safe” for pets. (Also note that Greenies had a bad rap for blockages too, even though they “reformulated” I still don’t trust them.)

 

I recommend “bully sticks”, they are fully digestible. Just don’t tell anyone what they are (dried bull penis). Wink  They are a bit pricy at petstores ($3-$6 each), but I buy them in bulk from BestBullySticks.com for a fraction of the price.

Post # 12
Member
4765 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: January 2011 - Vintage Villas

I definitely think the Petsmart classes are AMAZING, and you should absolutely check them out!

I’ve found with our puppy that he’s a lot more well behaved when he has plenty of toys around to chew on – he chew on them instead of us, or our furniture. When the puppy does bite you, making a loud, high pitched yelp (like a puppy would do) is a good indication to them that they’re hurting you.

Also, this isn’t necessarily always an option, but a really good way to cut down on negative behavior like that is to completely ignore it. For example, our 6 month old lab puppy loves to jump on us when we come home, but when he does we put our hands behind our back, look at the wall, and don’t move. He realizes really quickly that jumping isn’t getting him any attention, and he will calm down and sit in front of us – then he gets tons of love! When they’re biting, it’s a bit harder to ignore, but if you can I’ve found that it’s really effective!

Post # 14
Member
1049 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 1998

We have a puppy who is 5.5 months but he was about 10 weeks when we got him. Shortly after we brought him home, he turned into a biting machine! He ripped my favorite pair of pajamas and would scratch my arms up with his sharp little puppy teeth. I was at my wits end. We did everything you’re supposed to do – yelping, trading things he wasn’t supposed to be chewing for his toys – it was so frustrating! And then about a month ago it suddenly just… stopped. He will very occasionally mouth me softly, but he gets told off for it and even that is becoming really infrequent. A lot of it has to do with teething I think.

 

Just keep reprimanding him and be patient. He will get it eventually – it’s just a phase all puppies go through but I can tell you, a few months ago I thought 1) that we had brought a vicious wild beast into the house and 2) that he was never ever going to listen and I would lose my mind trying to make him get it. It’s frustrating and tiring but if you keep at it one day you’ll wake up and not even be able to remember the last time he nipped you!

Post # 15
Member
1049 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 1998

I almost forgot the most important thing by far – excercise! Charlie’s best days are when he’s had good walks or time at the dog park to burn off all of his extra puppy energy. When he’s been in the house or cooped up all day (bad weather days, for example) he turns into a little devil because he’s got all that extra energy. Make time to excercise her a lot – long walks are best and you’ll see a drastic improvement in her attitude. Good luck – let us know how it goes!

Post # 15
Member
4 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: May 2013

Hi everyone! I know this thread was almost 4 years ago but I am going through this right now! Did the puppy in the original post ever stop the biting??? Please tell me there’s hope bc I’m worrying we made the wrong choice and I want nothing more than to cuddle with our new 16 week old Pom. He is a male so im wondering if neutering will help his aggression. It does seem like he’s playing when he bites but it’s nonstop! Our pants, us, our home… He doesn’t respond to no or yelping or ignoring or anything I’ve read. Help!!!!

  • This reply was modified 4 years, 5 months ago by  lisafante. Reason: Typos

The topic ‘Puppy won’t stop biting and I’m losing my mind… help!’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors