(Closed) Question about my Pup

posted 7 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
2638 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2006

Hmmm. Are you also the one who feeds and generally cares for the pup? If not, try taking more of the otherresponsibilities so he starts seeing you as a caregiver. Also, are you crate training? The “nothing’s free” stage for puppies is crucial…

Post # 5
Member
2638 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2006

LOL. Dogs are different from kids in that they never learn to tell you what the problem is so until they learn English . . . 🙂

It sounds like the room that you have is working, unless that’s the room he is using to go to the bathroom in. I guess I’m confused as to where and when the accidents are occurring.

If he’s relieving himself in the room where he’s penned up then yes you should get a crate small enough so that he cannot make a “potty area” in it. Dogs do not like to be in or near their own waste. If you’re concerned about size you can buy the biggest crate now and use cardboard to make it small enough for the dog. 36 pounds definitely doesn’t seem to big but it’s your call.

If the dog is relieving himself in other areas of the house once you get home, then crate training will likely help you. It seems cruel but this means he is never, ever allowed outside the crate unless he has your undivided attention. Then, once he goes outside, he’s rewarded with outside-the-crate time. It takes a few weeks, sometimes longer, but it will likely work.

Also, are you trying to get him to go on his walks or in your yard? It might help to make an area in the yard where you put the waste you find in the house so that his scent is there. It sounds gross but it’s worked for me . . .

Post # 7
Member
454 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

I recommend crate training for the bathroom issues.  My dog is 70 lbs and she sleeps in a crate at night so as long as you get a big enough crate, I don’t see why any size dog would be too big for a crate.  Also when my dog is very distracted and smelling new things, or we walk on a new route, or when the walk is too short, she is a lot less likely to go to the bathroom on her walk.  I would recommend walking the same route so there are familiar smells and they know where to go (if you aren’t already doing this).

Post # 9
Member
786 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

@daybyday: All great ideas, the other thing that helped me with training our dogs was offering them treats when they did go to the BR outside. The positive reinforcement helped a lot with training them as to where it was ok to go. We started with just going to the BR outside in general, and then eventually just when they pooped outside. Hope these suggestions work for you, good luck!

Post # 10
Member
786 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

@ABCarlyle: This isn’t a punishing technique persay, but when my dog started acting out and I had to rehousebreak her (I had just started going back to work full time after being home for 4 months with my ACL tear/surgery/rehab) I started putting diapers on her as well. She really hated it, and I would leave them off when she went both outside, and otherwise the diaper would go back on when we were in the house and she wasn’t in her crate.

Post # 12
Member
454 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

Luckily we dont have this bathroom issue, like it only happens once in a blue moon that she will go inside and it’s usually our own fault.  But I have heard that when they do go inside, unfortunately there is really no way to discipline the action unless you catch them in the act.  Then you can use a sharp “EH” or “NO” and redirect them outside, then praise them for going outside.

If you catch it after the fact, they don’t know to associate the scolding with something they did earlier.  And still positive reinforcement will work much better.  Even now that our girl is regularly going outside, I still make a really big deal over it.  I use a high pitched voice and praise her several times (my neighbor calls me the dog whisperer lol).  They must think I’m nuts.  But from what I understand, that’s the best thing you can do.  I see the PP recommended treats when they go outside, that’s another great idea for positive reinforcement.

Also when we let her out back, I often think she is done after peeing.  But if I stand there and ignore her a little, she will start to sniff and circle around looking for a spot to poop and she will do it eventually.  I think she has caught on that I’m waiting for something.

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