(Closed) Question for the professional photographers re: buying new camera

posted 6 years ago in Photos/Videos
Post # 3
Member
303 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2014 - Barn

Personally I love the 7d. Like you said, it’s not a full frame which I like for portraits. Personally I don’t think it’s a “not quite professional” body – I know of lots of photographers with that body. I also LOVE the amount of AF points which I use a lot to get a lock in those eyes. 7D is great for portrait works.

Post # 4
Member
621 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

@CorgiTales:  If you’re looking to shoot weddings, get a Mark II. The full frame and ISO capabilities make it a better long term investment for you than the 7d. I had a 7d when I was first starting out but found it wasn’t doing what I wanted so I quickly traded it in for the Mark II. You’ll want to shoot weddings with mostly L lenses anyway so not being able to use the lens you have is a small trade off when you consider the improvement in image quality.

Post # 6
Member
6574 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: September 2012

I’d go with the mkII, and rent an additional mkII when needed. I wasn’t that impressed with the 7D. Then again, I’d never part with my mkII’s. I did just shoot with the mkIII at last weekend’s wedding – amazing! I think I’ll be selling one of my mkII’s to upgrade. ๐Ÿ™‚

Post # 7
Member
6574 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: September 2012

@CorgiTales:  You’ll hate having to go back to a 7D from a mkII. My opinion is that your backup camera should be of the same quality as your primary camera. The point of it as backup, if your primary camera fails are you going to be happy/comfortable shooting a wedding in a dark hole with a 7D?

Post # 8
Member
621 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

@CorgiTales:  I used the 7d Mark II combo for about 3 months before I realized it wasn’t working for me. The problem with it for weddings is that if you’re using both cameras your images aren’t going to look consistent. In the same setting, the full frame camera allows more light from a scene in, so I got really frustrated in the editing process because I couldn’t get my 7d files to seamlessly match my mark II files. My 7d is now my back up back up, to the Mark II and Mark III. There’s also the issue of different file sizes too which has an effect on what size you can print things. If you were shooting only portraits or something like that the 7d is great, but like Starfish says, you don’t want to be in a situation where your rental fails (it will!) and you are stuck using the 7d in a dimly lit wedding scenario. If you’re really serious about this, and it seems you are, the Mark II is the better and safest investment.

Post # 9
Member
739 posts
Busy bee

If you want to go pro these are the first three things you need to buy: 5dMII Love mine and you don’t need to go MKIII this early in the game. You could even get a used MKII. Just make sure you get the shutter count or if it’s been replaced or not. It will cost $200 to replace it. The next thing is a 24-70 L series lens. You should NOT be using a 10-22 for portraits. It’s to wide and you want that yummy compression. Wide shots often make people look well wider, so having a 70mm for portraits will make them look more flattering. Use your feet to zoom out if you want to get wider. It’s important to have a decent camera body but using crap kit lenses it wont matter if you are using an awesome camera. Lenses are as important as the body if not more. The third is a 580II flash and something to soften or bounce. I love the Flip-It for mine. 

Also with the 7d you might be able to get away with using it now, but it’s going to be outdated and you possibly outgrowing it much sooner then you would the MKII so that would end up wasted money. The investment lasts longer. 

It’s a pretty crazy business, good luck ๐Ÿ˜‰ 

Post # 11
Member
1314 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2006

I don’t shoot Canon, but if I were you I’d ditch the 7D altogether and buy a 5DMKII and the original 5D (I’ve seen them going as low as $700).  The original 5D is great for 75% of your wedding day, and there is a benefit to having both of your cameras be full frame with a similar control layout.  

As far as lenses go I hate zooms, so I don’t have much to add to that except that if you are shooting weddings no lens you use should be slower than f/2.8.  Personally I think primes are the way to go.  35, 50, 80 are my mainstays.  The only zoom I use is a 70-200 f/2.8.

Post # 13
Member
1405 posts
Bumble bee

Yeah, you need to be go FF for a wedding business.  I don’t like primes for candid work.  24-70 and 70-200, 100 macro, and a 16-35 should cover just about everything.

 

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