(Closed) Raw Diet

posted 4 years ago in Pets
Post # 2
Member
4023 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: April 2016 - Manhattan, NY

I personally wouldn’t put my dog on a raw diet because of all of the germs from uncooked meat that would spread all over our house and us. Putting them on a higher quality food with real meat and vegetables (less grain) might be helpful. Lamb and duck based foods seem to work well for dogs with allergies from past experiences. Both my mother and I use Nutro brand. My dog has no allergies that we know of but my mom’s dog does and he’s done well on Nutro.  

Post # 4
Member
57 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: October 2017 - NOLA

I switched my cats over to a raw diet and they are thriving. The boy used to have issues with hair loss on his ears, and now his hair has grown back completely there. My girl has issues with allergies and watery eyes and that’s cleared up as well. It may be different for dogs (different nutrients) but it’s not as time consuming as you would think to make it once you’ve done it for awhile. There should be no issues with raw meat, as that’s what they’d be eating in the wild. We bought a small meat grinder to grind up chicken livers and hearts, along with the rest of the meat and add the vitamins (especially taurine for cats, don’t know what dogs need specifically) in. I googled and youtubed and I use this recipe for my cats:

http://thepuppyshow.com/my-diet/

I’m sure you could find something very similar for your dog! Good luck!

ETA hmmm it didn’t show up. The link is thepuppyshow (dot) com all together and hopefully you should be able to find the diet from there

 

 

Post # 5
Member
701 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2018

I do. Three dogs, two small and one large. I’ve done it for years and years. Dogs do not digest bacteria the way that we do. Google “Leerburg raw diet” to find his information. There are also some great forums. Unfortunately, it is not something that I am able to provide you with a ton of information over this board, and it is not something that you want to do without doing a substantial about of research. Pre made raw, like Darwins, is cost prohibitive for me, so I make my own. The bulk of my dogs diets are chicken backs, quarters, necks, and organs, as well as scraps I can get from hunters, and whole fish. I also use a suppliment called ‘the missing link plus’ which provides DHA and omegas that might otherwise be missing. I do use a veggie blend from a brand called “Honest Kitchen” in order to provide veggies, as I don’t feed prey model raw, and do believe dogs recieved veggies from the intestines of killed animals. Exact bone to meat and organ ratios are dependant on the dog, but be aware that a raw diet takes a lot of time and research, and it is not something you should venture on without doing a substantial amount of research. 

Join a rawfeeding forum, they have some of the best information available. 

 

 

 

Post # 6
Member
1936 posts
Buzzing bee

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ladyvictoria :  lol sorry but this is the biggest load of bullshit πŸ˜‚

Feeding raw does not add germs to your household, I can’t believe tat people still spout that crap! OP, dogs digest much faster than us, and the cleanliness depends on your own personal hygiene. If you handle the meat and walk around the house with blood-hands then if coursethats gross. But treat it just the same as you would meat for your own dinner, wipe spills and wash your hands. 

My dogs and my cat are raw food, and they’re so healthy! I would recommend having a look through the ‘education’ tab on this website – http://www.rawessentials.co.nz (the lady who owns this company is a vet).

Also, avoid cooked food. It lacks the nutrients, raw meat, bones, an a bit of fruit & veg is all you need. 

There are lots of FB groups for raw feeding you can chat in. It’s important to ensure you feed bone and chunk meat, not just minces. These will clean their teeth from the ripping and crunching. 

Good luck bee, changing to raw is the best idea!

Post # 7
Member
612 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2017

One of the best diets you can feed your pets is a well-educated home cooked one. Conversely, one of the worst things you can do for your pet is feed a home-cooked diet without researching your pet’s nutritional needs first. It takes quite a bit of learning and planning to make sure you’ve got your pet’s dietary needs all taken care of when only feeding home-cooked or home-prepped raw, so most people I know who do home-prep their pet’s food just mix up a meal topper to supplement kibble or freeze dried raw. That’s an option you could consider.  If you’re looking to prepare your dog’s food yourself, I’d highly recommend checking out Dr Karen Becker DVM. She’s a very reputable vet and animal nutritionist (who hasn’t been paid to promote Hills) who’s written a few books and continues to write articles and promote healthy practices for pets and their owners on her website. 

You can buy packaged frozen complete and balanced raw dog food at most pet stores, or online through sites like chewy and only natural pet. They already have the vitamin and mineral balance right, so you just have to thaw and serve. It takes a bit of prep work, but not like home-prepping does. As PP pointed out though, frozen raw comes with the same risks as raw meat, and should be handled in the same way. Unsafe handling practices (so not washing hands, sanitizing surfaces, picking up and regularly cleaning bowls, etc.) could lead to illness. 

Another option is freeze dried raw, which is my personal favorite. Freeze dried raw foods are complete and balanced, convenient, light weight (SO nice if you’re into traveling, hiking, backpacking or camping) and as safe as kibble to handle. The manufacturers process ingredients in a way that kills pathogens and minimizes risks of illness to humans, but doesn’t break down the amino makeups in food the same way that cooking it does. You pretty much get the best of both worlds. It is still processed, and the process does degrade some of the enzymes, but it’s still far, FAE better than extruded kibble. The hardest part about feeding FDR is that if you have a picky eater (my dog is) finding a FDR they’ll eat can be tough. 

 

Post # 8
Member
1487 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2016

We feed raw but don’t have time to make it ourselves. We feed BARF bricks and then add veggies on top. We’ll put things like sweet potatoe, pumpkin, apple, carrots, etc in href bowl for her at random times. She self regulates really well (not all dogs do) so if her body wants it she eats it but otherwise she’ll leave it. 

Our girl is THRIVING on this diet. She is in great weight (was too thin before on very high quality kibble) and her coat is thick and shiny, she has great poops, and has lots of energy without any sense of being tightly wound, just a willingness to go but happy to switch off after. I attribute a lot of it to the diet and some of it to maturing πŸ™‚

definitely recommend raw diets but agree with PP that doing your research first is important!

Post # 9
Member
577 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 1969 - City, State

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garnobella :  Exactly!  I can’t even handle people who spew this crap, especially vets!?   

View original reply
ladyvictoria :  Dogs have completely different digestive systems than humans do. The pH level in their saliva and stomachs destroy the bacteria found in raw meat.  I’ve been raw feeding my dog for a few years now, and although I wait about 15minutes after he eats for him to give kisses, we’ve never had any issues.  Obviously you have to be clean about it, but unless you’ve never cooked meat, then you would already know and hopefully practice safe handling procedures.  

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prinzesschen :  Switching to raw will probably be the best thing you do for your pup.  I prepare my own and follow prey model raw (80% muscle meat, 10% bone 10% organ – 5% of which is liver).  As for recipes, I feed a variety of proteins; Turkey, Lamb, Rabbit, Chicken, Beef, Duck, Fish are some staples.  I don’t feed any Pork at all.  

Just so you know, I switched my dog because he was dealing with a lot of allergies caused by processed kibble, and he went through a serious detox period where he was itchy, had yeast overgrowths, flaky skin, etc but after a few months it all cleared up and we’ve never looked back.  Your vet will likely not recommend raw feeding, so if you get too much push back don’t be surprised.       

Post # 10
Member
4023 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: April 2016 - Manhattan, NY

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prinzesschen :  Have you talked to your vet about other options? Either way, best of luck! It seems to be working for other people who have posted here. To address you both (
View original reply
garnobella : ) obviously I know how to handle raw meats and keep a clean house. My fur baby is notorious for drinking and/or eating then running up and putting her snout on us for snuggles. I don’t want raw meat drool on me or all over my house.  

Post # 11
Member
5046 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2014

I had my one dog on a commercially made one that worked great.
Now my beagle puppy tried that one and a locally made one and she kept getting bacterial infections. So now she’s on Royal Canin hydrolyzed protein that is working really well. I am waaaaaaaay too lazy to keep up on actually making the raw.

Post # 12
Member
2236 posts
Buzzing bee

We do pre-packaged raw food that is already balanced correctly. It’s expensive, but our dog THRIVES on it.

She had puppy pampilloma for MONTHS and it was growing rather than subsiding. We switched her to raw food and literally within TWO WEEKS, all the warts had shrunk and disappeared. It was amazing. We had to quarantine her (and thus ourselves) for the entire summer because of those stupid warts – wish we had started the raw sooner!

Her anxiety also got much better. She used to poop multiple times a day. Now she poops once a day and it’s very small and compact – you can tell there’s far less waste from this food. 

We just got a new puppy and are already transitioning her over – she seems to love it. 

We also like to eat egg-white omelettes, so we often supplement their meals with raw egg yolk, and of course they get plenty of raw veggies as treats.

The bacteria thing is incorrect. We feed them on plates so very little food gets on their fur. The puppy is long-haired, and I just wipe down her muzzle after she eats – but that’s not really necessary. Their saliva gets onto their muzzle hairs when they lick their chops and the saliva breaks down the bacteria.

If you can afford it/you have the time to food prep, the results are VERY noticeable and SOO worth it!

Post # 15
Member
1936 posts
Buzzing bee

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ladyvictoria :  For what it’s worth, I don’t mean directly you. 😊 It’s a really common anti-raw myth that raw feeding is unhygienic or dangerous, but it isn’t. To each their own, but my dogs do the same as yours and they are BIG (the little one is 100+ lbs and she isn’t even a year old). Dogs are pretty darn clean though, they don’t come inside with meaty/bloody snoots.

Not saying you HAVE to raw feed of course, I personally believe it is the absolute best way to feed, but it isn’t for everyone. I would just hate for someone to avoid raw because they think it’s unsanitary or that their dog would come back into the house with blood and gore. 

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