(Closed) Raw Diet

posted 4 years ago in Pets
Post # 16
Member
3935 posts
Honey bee

I’m glad to see all of the positive responses. Many times I’ve seen a bunch of people (on other forums) pile on saying feeding raw will kill your dog, you’re not a vet so you can’t know how to feed, etc.

I fed raw for over 10 years with zero problems, and it 100% cured my collie/shepherd of her allergies within 30 days. As a side bonus, my terrier mix was cured of her hellacious gas ๐Ÿ™‚ I bought chicken necks and organs from a wholesaler.

Do your research, as others advised. Also keep in mind that your pets do not require a perfectly balanced meal every time. The goal is a balanced diet *over time*, just like you feed yourself.

Post # 17
Member
4023 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: April 2016 - Manhattan, NY

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garnobella :  It definitely seems that this is a topic that your average dog owner is not well versed in. It seems worth trying out if your dog really needs it. I’m grateful that our  fur baby is fine on a good kibble. She’s an inside dog so she eats all her meals right in the kitchen. And sometimes the food doesn’t stay in the bowl! She likes to walk around and sometimes put food down on her blankie or other random places to eat.

Here’s the cutie ๐Ÿ™‚ 

Post # 18
Member
65 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: June 2018

We feed freeze-dried raw (esp as we have to have packaged food for his daycare days and travel) and occassionally supplement with whatever raw meat we cook for ourselves. We feed Stella and Chewys, Primal, and sometimes Orijen. Observe the same raw-meat habits you would for your own food (washing hands, etc) and the freeze dried or frozen raw have even less chance for pathogens. The concern is really only if someone in the household is immunocompromised (which is why raw-fed dogs can’t be therapy dogs).

Post # 19
Member
1936 posts
Buzzing bee

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ladyvictoria :  You’re totally right, and honestly even the vets can’t seem to agree on what is right! My dogs are deep chested, so I wouldn’t dare try them on a kibble. Fresh works best for us! Your dog is gorgeous! That face ๐Ÿ˜

 

Post # 20
Member
909 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2017

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prinzesschen :  I’m absolutely shocked at some of the so called ‘truths’ that people have posted about raw food diets on this thread ๐Ÿ™ For example dog saliva does not kill bacteria!!

OP, there is a lot of misinformation out there. There is a reason that the CDC, FDA, American Veterinary Medical Association, Canadian Veterinary Medical Association among many others DO NOT recommend raw food diets – very simply they pose a health risk to your pet and yourself! It is a veterinarian’s duty to advise on the health of your pet and the impact on its owner based on the proven science that is available, not based on anecdotal evidence written on blogs.

https://www.cdc.gov/features/raw-pet-food/

https://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm403350.htm

https://www.avma.org/KB/Resources/FAQs/Pages/Raw-Pet-Foods-and-the-AVMA-Policy-FAQ.aspx

https://www.canadianveterinarians.net/documents/raw-food-diets-for-pets

 

Post # 21
Member
2993 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2017

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DrCrazyCat :  +10000 

I would never recommend raw diet to my patients. There are some exceptions for a COOKED homemade diet for very specific dietary restrictions, with appropriate vitamin/mineral supplementation. 

OP, please don’t take advice about pet food from people who aren’t veterinarians. 

 

 

Post # 22
Member
1491 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2016

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prinzesschen :  So in the US I htink they call them “frozen BARF patties” — basically you can get them in logs or in patties. Where I live (EU) you can get mixed recipes (i.e. several meats together) and the patties aren’t individually wrapped, but come together loose in a box which I then put into the freezer. I prefer it since it cuts down on packaging but I could see how the individually packaged patties are convenient.

Post # 23
Member
45 posts
Newbee

As a former veterinary technician I’m going to have to advise against feeding raw as well. There’s a reason that raw-fed animals are not allowed to volunteer at hospitals and nursing homes: because they can in fact transmit salmonella to people. It’s just not safe. Dogs are not wolves. Even feeding a balanced homemade cooked diet is difficult for the average pet owner.

Post # 24
Member
35 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: June 2019 - Gainesville, VA

I used to buy in bulk and do my own (quarters, backs; necks, beef heart, etc) until my old dog was having trouble with it. So I switched back over to K9 Kraving. It’s pricey but it’s ground up and easier. Quick and convenient if you can find it near you. My vets all agree with my dog’s diet, no issues there.

Post # 25
Member
635 posts
Busy bee

Raw food feeder here too and would NEVER go back to kibble. While she was eating it, my terrier had multiple issues with her bowel, urinary tract, skin, hair, claws… it was awful. We tried several different recommended brands and there was no improvement. Per the advice of our vet, we switched to raw and everything cleared up in under a month with no medication required. She is exponentially healthier and happier than she was when she ate kibble. I actually hardly know anyone who still feeds their dogs kibble. My mom does, however, and if my dog ever gets in to her dogs food, it shows up with her skin peeling and hair falling out again within a day. 

The risks really are not any higher than if you prepare meat for your family. Obviously hand washing is imperative, but that’s just common sense. Also I have yet to meet a dog who eats raw that leaves even a microscopic trace in their bowl. They devour it and lick the bowl clean every time. Hand washing and cleaning their bowl after each meal is not rocket science. 

Post # 26
Member
97 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: July 2016

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prinzesschen :  My dogs have been on a raw diet for the past 3 years! I feed them chicken carcuses, beef heart, liver and kidney on occasion. No recipe really just make sure they get a variety. My border collie mix has terrible allergies, environmental and food allergies. We thought it was food at first so changed her diet then her symptoms changed to environmental. Unfortunately we ended up having to put her on medication but kept the raw diet because we have seen huge benefits with their fur, weight, teeth and even my 10 year old border collie’s hips started to get better!

My other dog has been on it since he was 12 weeks old (currently almost 4) and we get comments all the time how soft his fur is and asking if he’s a puppy!

Post # 27
Member
4 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: October 2016

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ButternutPoppy :  sounds like you went from one extreme to the next. Hydrolized protein diets are horrible quality and not appropriate for growing puppies. If you’re not comfortable feeding raw there are as million better dry foods out there.

Post # 28
Member
4 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: October 2016

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prinzesschen :  good for you for looking into bettering your pets health through diet. My dog has been on raw for 7 years and has done amazingly well on it. Don’t let vets/uneducated people discourage you. It’s ironic that we think it’s inappropriate for our kids to eat all processed foods yet it’s ok for our pets to eat processed nuggets filled with preservatives and think it’s the best thing for them. There are plenty of holistic vets who are for raw diets. Most vets like to use scare tactics such as bacteria, parasites, etc but doing basic research you’ll find out that dogs are well capable to handle large loads of bacteria ( hence why they can eat poop and not get sick). As long as you use the same skills as you prepare your own meals, you won’t have issues. I’ve never been sick with anything remotely related to a raw diet and neither has my dog. Hes extremely healthy for his age (12) and we still regularly run and hike together.

I normally recommend starting with a well balanced premade brand such as vital essentials, primal, Stella&chewys, etc, see how your dog does on it and if you want to commit to making your own, it takes some planning and research but it’s quite doable. There are so many resources online plus books you can purchase. Feel free to pm me for more info!

Post # 29
Member
1936 posts
Buzzing bee

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DrCrazyCat :  
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anev :  
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wendymoiraangeladarling :  So what about all the vets who say raw is the absolute best way to feed, it’s safe, and it far exceeds any commercial kibble? Or do they not count because they have a different opinion to your own. VETS recommend raw, so by your own logic it’s perfectly fine. 

FWIW vets aren’t Gods. Just like doctors aren’t Gods. They only know what they have been taught, and can’t possibly know everything about every animal. They get it wrong. Go back and look at the advice doctors used to give vs what we are now told. Science is so dynamic, we’re constantly learning new things and discovering better ways. I have had advice from vets that us so bizarre, and so nappropriate for the animal, just like I was ignored for over 10 years when I was suffering with horrible coeliacs. Humans don’t get it right every time, so it would be unwise to take any person’s advice as Gospel. 

Post # 30
Member
909 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2017

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garnobella :   

So what about all the vets who say raw is the absolute best way to feed, it’s safe, and it far exceeds any commercial kibble?

I genuinely don’t know any vets who say this. But if they did, I would ask them to produce the evidence-based research that proves that BARF diets are superior for the health of an animal compared to commericially produced diets. Because so far, I have not seen any. People can write all they want on their blogs based on what they think is true, it doesn’t mean that it is.

vets aren’t Gods

Of course I 100% agree with this ๐Ÿ˜‰ Vets are human and make mistakes and there is no blanket solution that works for every animal out there. Medicine is always changing and we are constantly learning new research and adjusting the way we practice to be in line with it. I am not saying not to feed BARF diets because vets just say so, because they are vets and think they know it all. It’s because so far, there has been no scientific data to prove that the benefits outweigh the risks.

Don’t forget that a risk is just that – a risk. Does it mean that every animal on a BARF diet and their owner is going to get sick? Of course not, just like how not every smoker gets lung cancer. I am not denying that some animals seem to be fine on it but my advice would always be not to recommend it based on 1) science that is currently available 2) the substantial time and effort it takes to feed an animal a balanced and complete BARF diet. Honestly it’s sad but even carrying out basic care for an animal can be beyond a lot of owners.

So if owners don’t want to take my advice, that’s fine, they don’t have to. But at least I’ve fulfilled my duty of care to ensure they are informed before making a decision.

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