(Closed) Re-thinking the alcohol at dinner reception (again)

posted 7 years ago in Food
Post # 3
Member
3522 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

It’s absolutely fine. We did this and there were no problems whatsoever. On our menu cards, we wrote, “Entrees come with your choice of appetizer and soft drink” and told the restaurant ahead of time that the cost of any alcohol would be up to the guests.

Post # 4
Member
163 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

Considering that all guests have to travel to be with you on your big day, maybe it would be nice of you to include the alcohol at the dinner as well (at least some wine!). If I found out about this the day of the wedding, I’d be pretty disappointed (not to mention I’d probably become a bit snarky and think the whole time of how cheap you are).

I don’t mean this badly, I’m being really honest, but only to give you a different point of view. Perhaps your guests already know you well and wouldn’t be suprised of this! If that is the case, I’m sure the restaurant will be ok with anything you choose.

Post # 5
Member
10288 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2011

I personally prefer to have the option of alcohol. You know your guests and their preferences, if you think they’d be fine without alcohol then don’t offer it. I know for myself as well as my wedding guests, if there wasn’t even wine we/they would not be happy campers. 

Post # 8
Member
3522 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

@MsInterpret: Not at all.

ETA: Anyone who grumbles or says unkind things to or about the B&G because of their choices is an ungrateful guest, imho. If food and water/soda/tea/whatever are provided, the bride and groom are taking care of their guests’ needs. Alcohol, while nice, is not a necessity and the bride and groom should not be made to feel bad because they have chosen not to offer it.

Post # 9
Member
10288 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2011

@MsInterpret: Sounds good to me. I’m sure it won’t make a difference as far as the corking fee goes (or would it?) but what about boxed wine? You would be able to get more bang for your buck going that route. 

@Mrs Grape: Just because I prefer to have the option of alcohol when attending a wedding does not make me an ungrateful guest. Some people just have different expectations than others. 

Post # 10
Member
3522 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

@UpstateCait: The preference isn’t the problem–it’s complaining about what has been provided that strikes me as a little off. I don’t eat red meat, but I find a way to deal with it if that’s all that’s provided at a wedding…it’s kind of the same thing. You make do with what’s there.

Post # 12
Member
295 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

I’m in the situation where we are bringing the liquor for our reception, so I kind of understand how you feel.  I think if you had a red and a white wine, you’d be fine.  The environment of your “reception” is not one of music and danciong b ut rather an intimate dinner.  At those wine is what you’d expect.  The bigger bottle shpuld help save money.  If you know your friends that well, calculate 2 glasses per person and then a cushion for the extra drink or so.  Don’t want to have to buy a bottle from them for miscalculating  πŸ™‚

If you’d do liquor at your guest house, I’d only worry about logistics for the guests.  For those who travel, how far is it from the hotel?  I know that whenI’ve traveled for a wedding, we didn’t want to veer off from the hotel after the wedding.  The idea of drinking in an unknown town is not comforting to me.

Post # 13
Member
1124 posts
Bumble bee

We are not having any alcohol. Not because we’re cheap, but because we’d just rather not. If I went to a wedding without alcohol, I wouldn’t think a thing of it. It’s pretty rude to get upset at a couple for not having alcohol at THEIR wedding.

Post # 14
Member
1629 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

yeah i like the compromise of having just red and white wine you bring yourself and pay the corking fee.

Post # 15
Member
1398 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I might suggest 4 or 5 bottles of champagne, for a toast, and pay the corkage fee on those and make the party aware that you will have alcohol at the house later. With a small group like this, it shouldn’t be a huge issue to let them know this. What town in Iowa are you getting married in? I’m in the Quad Cities myself, but my hometown is Omaha, across the river from Council Bluffs.

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