(Closed) Reading choices

posted 8 years ago in Catholic
Post # 3
Member
711 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

These were our two readings:

 

 The two of them become one body.

A reading from the Book of Genesis 2:18-24

 

and my favourite:

Ephesians 5:21-33 l Submitting To One Another

Submitting yourselves to one another in the fear of God. Wives, submit yourselves unto your own husbands, as unto the Lord. For the husband is the head of the wife, even as Christ is the head of the church; and he is the savior of the body. Therefore as the church is subject unto Christ, so let the wives be to their own husbands in everything.

Husbands, love your wives, even as Christ also loved the church, and gave himself for it. That he might sanctify and cleanse it with the washing fo water by the word. That he might present it to himself a glorious church, not a having spot, or a wrinkle or any such thing; but that it should be holy and without blemish. So ought men to love their wives as their own bodies. He that loveth his wife loveth himself. For no man ever yet hated his own flesh; but nourisheth and cherisheth it, even as the Lord the church. For we are members of his body, of his flesh, and of his bones. For this cause shall a man leave his father and mother, and shall be joined unto his wife, and they two shall be one flesh. This is a great mystery, but I speak concerning Christ and the church. Nevertheless let every one of you in particular so love his wife even as himself and the wife see that she reverence her husband.

 

Post # 4
Member
1403 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

I’m a tad non-traditional and decided to pick something outside the Together for Life book.  We used Ecclesiastes 4:9-12 and our priest approved it.  Technically you’re only required to have one reading as long as it’s from the Old Testament, and our wedding was bilingual, so we just had this one read once in English and once in Spanish.

“Two are better than one,
   because they have a good return for their labor:
If either of them falls down,
   one can help the other up.
But pity anyone who falls
   and has no one to help them up.
Also, if two lie down together, they will keep warm.
   But how can one keep warm alone?
Though one may be overpowered,
   two can defend themselves.
A cord of three strands is not quickly broken.”

Post # 5
Member
1025 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@jenbrandner: I love that one.  I never understood why it wasn’t considered a traditional choice.

Post # 6
Member
350 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 1991

@jenbrandner: Technically you’re required to have 4 readings:  Hebrew Scripture or Acts, Psalm, New Testament,  and Gospel.  During a weekday, you can get away with just 3:  Hebrew Scripture, Psalm, and Gospel. 

Post # 7
Member
1403 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@CoffeeHound:  I hadn’t counted the psalm (since it’s sung) or the gospel, but yes of course they are required.

As far as the other two readings, it is in fact acceptable to skip one if there is good reason and the priest approves it.  This happens to be mentioned on the Catholic Wedding Help website too.

“Catholic weddings usually include three readings plus the responsorial psalm, although one of the first two readings may sometimes be omitted if there is a good reason (check with your pastor).”

http://catholicweddinghelp.com/wedding-planning/06-choose-readings.htm#lectionary

Post # 8
Member
350 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 1991

@jenbrandner: Only on a non-solemnity.  So your ceremony would have to be on a weekday or early on Saturday.  And even then it’s not a norm.

Also, the Psalm is often not sung.  Really, you’d only do that if you had a cantor. 

Post # 9
Member
1403 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@CoffeeHound:  In my (admittedly limited) experience, most churches don’t hold weddings on solemnities.  Our church required the wedding mass to take place at 1pm on Saturday.  Good point that if the OP’s wedding is on a solemnity she should have both readings.

I’ve also never heard of the psalm regarded as a reading, but I guess that’s just semantics.  🙂

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