(Closed) Reducing autism risk

posted 7 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
5543 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2011

Honestly, no one has ANY idea what causes autism, and therefore, no idea what can help prevent it. The “main” ideas about what causes autism have been proven to be false ( so vaccinate your kids!!) and the therapies used to help like diet changes have shown little change.

While the things you suggest are good ideas for pregnancy, pesticides aren’t good for anyone and pre-natal viatmins have proven healthy for women, there is little if any truth to them helping prevent autism. 

Post # 4
Member
2695 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2008

I tried to limit my intake of pesticides as much as possible – not because of autism, but just in general.  So I ate organic as much as possible and tried to never have any of the dirty doze unless they were organic.  It freaks me out that most of our systems carry some level of pesticides (=poison) based on our food supply. I did this through pregnancy and nursing.

Post # 5
Member
538 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

I had read something about Red Dye #40 potentially having a link. 

There are SO many products out there that have this red dye in it.  For me, I don’t think the small potential not scientifically proven link is worth completely eliminating half of the foods I eat. 

However, I was VERY surprised that many of the Out of Town prenatal vitamins contain this Red Dye #40 (particularly womens one a day).  With taking these vitamins daily while growing a baby, I figured the least I could do was find a prenatal that did not have this in it.  There are plenty of options out there (vitafusion for example) so this wasn’t a hard sacrifice. 

Post # 8
Member
5543 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2011

@abbyful: Well, from personal exsperiance (a cousin and two nephew in law, we are all super close) you have to move on from what caused this and work on what is best for you kid now. Blaming anything that might or might not have caused this does no one any good, while I am not saying it is bad to try to prevent if you can, what happens if (God forbid) you do all this and your baby still has autism? Are you going to love them less? OF COURSE NOT! 

While the examples you specifically listed don’t do any harm, as we have all seen with the “vaccines cause autism!” BS all it takes is one crazy to cause a panic and a lot of kids to get hurt, and totally based of nothing. 

Again, not saying trying to prevent is bad, and good for you for doing your research! But at the same time, don’t let stuff like this rule your life (not saying you are, just in general). 

Post # 9
Member
785 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I recently stumbled on a VERY interesting article relating pitocin use (the drug that augments labor) and autism.  Kinda scary, and makes me absolutely positive that when we finally start TTC, I will avoid a pitocin-induced labor at all costs.

http://www.autismtoday.com/articles/ATTN_Researchers.htm

Post # 11
Member
538 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

I think its a great idea to start looking at this kind of stuff and the EASY things we can do to try to avoid POTENTIAL risks. 

Post # 12
Member
2030 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: December 1969

There was a news article I read last year that said they had proven one cause of autism, although it wasn’t the cause for most cases. I don’t recall the name of the drug, but it was a drug given to moms who went into labor super early, and it was given to moms to halt labor. The use of the drug to delay labor was an off-label use of the drug, although it is commonly used for this. Certainly it is FAR better to risk autism than to risk a premature birth, but it is useful to know if your child has been exposed to a risk factor so that you can keep an eye out for signs of autism, since early detection and intervention are so important. Maybe some of the nurses or doctors on here know the name of the drug?

Post # 13
Member
389 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

From what little I’ve read, the current thinking is that it’s the interplay between genetic factors and environmental factors that causes it. And by seeing autism in 3 different generations of my family, I really see genetics as playing an undeniable role in the disorder. That said, I certainly think that it can’t hurt to avoid ingesting or being surrounded by excess chemicals in your home– especially plastics in their various forms. I’m avoiding them mostly bc it’s better for the planet, but I also like the idea that *maybe* they can prevent any autism our children may inherit from being quite as severe… but I’m certainly not expecting anything I do in my pregnancy to prevent autism altogether.

Post # 14
Member
13096 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

In my neuroscience class in college, we read “The Brain That Chages Itself” by Norman Doidge.  It discussed a potantial link between exposure to white noise during key periods in the formation/strengthening of neronal pathways and autism.  Definitely a very interetsing read!

@red_seattle: I totally agree that it is a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Post # 15
Member
2018 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

The age of the father is apparently a risk factor.  My ex-husband was 42 and 44 when our sons were born and the older one has Asperger’s and the younger one has PDD, both of which are on the milder end of the autism scale.  I was 25 and 27 when they were born.  I took pre-natal vitamins and avoided every single OTC drug, didn’t drink, or expose myself to anything toxic.

I had pitocin with one labor but not the other. Sometimes things just happen and no one really knows why.  Anyway, my Aspie has a genius IQ and my younger son is a talented writer/filmmaker at the tender age of 18 so I guess I would definitely do it all over again-older husband or not.  

Post # 16
Member
682 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2009

I think a lot of factors play into autism. My sister has 3 children, 2 boys (15 and 13) and a girl (4). All three have some form of Autism. They all have different dads so this makes me think genetics has a good part in her situation. Once the oldest one was diagnosed, my parents thought back to how my sister was and they think she has some autistic tendencies. Both my nephews are high functioning but one is super smart (the 13yo) while the 15yo is at about a 4th-5th grade level. I’m not sure how my neice is doing, I don’t talk to my sister that much.

Also, my sister was adopted and my parents were never sure about the birth mothers background, like whether she did drugs or not, or if there was a family history of autism or other mental retardation.

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