(Closed) Regional differences in terms

posted 10 years ago in The Lounge
  • poll: How do YOU say it? (Please vote for 1 in each category.)

    Soda or Pop - Pop

    Soda or Pop - Soda

    Sucker or Lollipop - Sucker

    Sucker or Lollipop - Lollipop

    Bag or Sack - Bag

    Bag or Sack - Sack

    Bag or Sack - Plastic is "sack", paper or reusable is "bag"

    Sofa or Couch - Sofa

    Sofa or Couch - Couch

  • Post # 47
    Member
    1724 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: May 2016

    My votes may not count – I grew up between several states, Kentucky, Tennessee, Texas, Louisiana, Maryland, Virginia, Florida… so my speech patterns don’t really match anyone else I’ve met.

    Soda

    Lollipop

    Bag

    Couch

    Cart

    Truck

    Dinner (southern parents said, “Supper”)

    Post # 48
    Member
    827 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: August 2011

    I’m from Northern California.  I say:

    Soda

    Lillipop (hard candy that has a stick on it)

    Sucker (hard candy that doesn’t have a stick)

    Bag (paper & plastic)

    Couch

    Cart

    Truck

    Dinner (though my grandma from Canada says supper & that’s what we trained our dog with)

     

    Post # 49
    Member
    41 posts
    Newbee
    • Wedding: May 2011

    View original reply
    @Ryansgirl:  lol, I think kangaroo jacket is an older term.  I grew up using that term in AB until I moved to BC for univeristy where it then become hoodie.  It just feels awkward saying kangaroo jacket! lol.

     

    As for chesterfield, yup, occassionally us that one, but mainly it is couch.

    Pop or Soda Pop!  HOw does everyone that calls it Coke differentiate between Sprite, Rootbeer etc? 

    Toque all the way…. is it really called a beanie in the States? 

     

    Post # 50
    Member
    322 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: April 2011

    I don’t think I saw this, but you need one for what “barbeque” means.  Down here, it’s brisket, ribs, etc.  But up north, it’s considered hamburgers and hot dogs 🙂

    Post # 51
    Member
    2788 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: January 2011

    View original reply
    @ttn133: Haha! You wouldn’t say “What are yous gonna do?”  I’m from Philly also!  

    soda, lollipop, paper or plastic – both bags, sofa and couch are interchangable, shopping chart, truck, dinner and most def. HOAGIE!!

    Post # 52
    Member
    1267 posts
    Bumble bee

    How fun! What great answers!!

    For the new questions:

    For spaghetti sauce its sauce

    For potaotes it’s gravy

    Hoodie

    Sneakers

    Troopers

    Barbeque: hamburger, hotdog, chicken

    The area of grass between crub and sidewalk: edging

    Post # 53
    Member
    952 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: August 2010

    View original reply
    @FMM: haha absolutely. The trend is starting to fade out with the new generation though. I will raise my kids to say bunnyhug dammit!

    Post # 54
    Member
    952 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: August 2010

    View original reply
    @Ryansgirl: SO TRUE! It is a Saskatchewan thing! So is Vi-Co and Kaiser!

    Post # 55
    Member
    608 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: August 2011

    Ok Funny story on the “Coke” being the same as soda or pop.  I moved across country and started waitressing.  My first week there an older gentlemen order a coke so I bring him a coke.  What the heck else would I bring you if you order a coke? Here is our conversation…
    Him “What is this?”
    Me: “The coke you ordered”
    Him: “Yes, I ordered a coke and what is this?”
    Me:  “Its a coke”
    Him: “How did you know what coke I wanted, you didn’t ask”
    Me: “Oh I’m sorry sir, we don’t have diet, did you want a diet coke?”
    Him: ” No, I want a 7-up”
    Finally dawns on me that “Coke” means soda and could be anything, not just coca cola. 

    A similar situation happened the next week when someone ordered a “half and half”.  I was taken aback since it was 110 degrees at a pool,  who is drinking half and half.  I’m thinking coffee creamer, he is thinking an arnold palmer.  
    It was a long summer, this happened to me A LOT.

    Post # 56
    Hostess
    11050 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: June 2011

    In the UK the only other difference from your list is instead of grocery cart we use a shopping trolley.

    Post # 57
    Member
    869 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: February 2011

    One of the things that bothers me most is when people call it “pop.” I was born in Californina and it was always called soda while I was growing up and then a few years ago my whole family started calling it pop. It drives me crazy! My Fiance calls it pop too and I’m going to beat him if he teaches our son to say it that way. lol. I want our children to grow up saying things properly. Buggy also bothers me for some reason but not nearly as much.

    Post # 58
    Member
    248 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: June 2011

    View original reply
    @SBourgeous: If someone asks what you want to drink…you say “coke” first meaning…a “soda/pop” then you say what you want….sprite, coke, pepsi..etc. etc. 

     

    or when you’re just talking about “soda or pop” everything is a Coke. But, if you’re actually ordering you say sprite, coke, pepsi…so on

    Post # 59
    Member
    183 posts
    Blushing bee

    I’m from Buffalo, NY

     

    Soda or Pop? – Pop

    Sucker or Lollipop? – Sucker

    Bag or Sack? – Bag

    Sofa or Couch? – Couch

    Cart or Buggy? – Cart

    Pickup or Truck? – Truck

    Dinner or Supper? – Dinner

    Post # 60
    Member
    183 posts
    Blushing bee

    View original reply
    @bride21: Just because pop isn’t “proper” to you doesn’t mean it isn’t the “proper” way to say it elsewhere in the world

    Post # 61
    Member
    175 posts
    Blushing bee
    • Wedding: September 2009

    Soda, sucker, bag, couch, buggy, truck, and supper.

    Almost my whole family calls sneakers “tennis shoes”–everything from Nikes to Converse and Keds. They’re all tennis shoes.

    I’m a decently educated person, but when I’m around my elderly grandfather or I’m upset, I don’t talk like it. Every time I say “ain’t” around DH, he cringes lol.

     

    The topic ‘Regional differences in terms’ is closed to new replies.

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