(Closed) Rehoming Pets — GRRR!!!

posted 4 years ago in Pets
Post # 91
Member
285 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2018

bumblebee12:  Oh my I agree! I so dislike seeing a post pop up on facebook about someone reselling a horse, with the often stating *Only selling because he/she can’t get me to the level I want to be*. It grinds my gears! Why don’t you be happy with a well trained ridable horse!

Oh and I completely agree about your statement about your shetland, I have one mini that I got years ago when I had only one horse that needed a companion. Once my herd got bigger with added horses and I technically no longer needed my mini as companion I didn’t ever think of rehoming him, just because he’s at his forever home as the rest of my animals! I love them!

I agree people need you think more about it, don’t think about just the current situation you’re in but also what can happen. I don’t see how people don’t think about that.

Thou it is nice to find another horse owner that doesn’t just pass the horse on, it’s just so darn common in this industry!

 

Post # 92
Member
521 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2016

Beegritte:  some people own and then for various reasons have to rent. People lose their houses sometimes. This is not a black and white kind of thing…

hellohedwig:  I have to disagree. I’m not saying people who irresponsible get a free pass. I agree that pets aren’t just things or possessions, but sometimes things happen that are out of people’s control. You can’t predict life. I hope you are never in a situation where you lose everything and have to rebuild your life. I think we should be sympathetic to those who are struggling and trying to do what’s best for their pet. I got my cat from someone rehoming him and I think we’re a way better family for him. We offer him a safer  environment, better quality food, and actual vet care. I’m so thankful that this guy decided to rehome his (now our) cat because he’s a great cat! And as I mentioned earlier, homelessness is a huge problem where I live because COL is so high. It’s sad to see it, but homeless pets and children are the saddest part. I think if you’re in an awful situation, maybe it’s best to find better home for your pet. 

Post # 93
Member
5219 posts
Bee Keeper

meglynn:  See, I also have horses (and 2 dogs) and they are definitely separated in my mind to some degree. I love all of my animals– but my dogs depend on me differently than the horses do. Also, the dogs (while capabale of PLENTY of damage) couldn’t touch what an unruly horse could do to me. I am 100% comfortable retiring a horse to pasture early, turning my mare into a broodmare if need be or bankrolling health issues. I’m not ok with an aggressive or dangerous horse and if I came into a situation where I happened to have one, I would not hesitate to re-home if need be.

So, if my horses became too much for me to handle and I knew they would be better suited with a better trainer, situation. etc… I would definitely go that route. It would kill me, as I’m extremely partial and love my walking horse to pieces. But, I don’t compare them with dogs and really try to keep them on different playing fields.

 

— to the dog point. I try not to judge. Animals are a huge part of my life, but I understand that sometimes pet owners are in over their heads and realize that. Sometimes too late, but I wouldn’t have my 2 dogs if it weren’t for someone admitting that they weren’t fit to raise them.

Post # 94
Member
521 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2016

acsweetpea:  I’m so sorry that happened to you! I completely understand what you’re saying. Where I live its so hard to find pet friendly rentals. I mean, it’s hard enough to find regular rentals! It’s very unfair that people judge others so freely. It’s one of those, “well it never happened to me” kind of issues where once people are in such situations, they (possibly, hopefully) see things differently.

Post # 95
Member
285 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2018

Mrs_Amanda:  I understand but before purchasing a horse one usually thoroughly ask questions about the horse , get a vet check, and do multiple visits before deciding to buy. So if there was any indication of the horse being agressive then one knows not to buy. Thou I do know drugging a horse can happen, but then be cautious about that. 

Now if one of my horses that never shown agression starts to act in ways I don’t like then I discipline them to stop it from becoming a problem.

I don’t quite understand why your horse would become to much for you if you did your research on the horse and discipline them.

Post # 96
Member
5219 posts
Bee Keeper

meglynn:  Well, no one (at least in my circle) buys a horse and up and decides to get rid of it willy nilly. But you’re right– buying/selling/re-homing is very common practice in the horse world.

In my circle,there’s always a reason, and a very good one at that. If one of my horses up and became aggressive, first thing I’m doing is correcting. If it doesn’t stop, get the vet out and check for an ailment, check teeth, saddle fit, whatever— make sure they’re ok. Every time I’ve ever considered purchasing a horse, a PPE is performed and looked over not only by me, but a trusted trainer. I “test drove” my mare for 3 weeks before deciding to purchase, which was awesome. And she’s a great, great horse for me.

However; it’s still not fool proof. So yes– if my 1,200 lb animal became uncontrollable/dangerous to me, and I exhausted every option trying to get to the bottom of the problem, I would absolutely re-home to someone either (A)more experienced or (B) had a better situation they thought would help whatever the issue was.

 

Luckily, I’ve never had to do that and all of my animals are extremely well behaved.

 

ETA: meant to add that herd dynamics also play into aggression at times. I’ve seen horses be completely gentle and well behaved, then moved into a new herd once purchased and it be a complete disaster. Sometimes those problems don’t arise until you have already purchased, especially if it is a situation where you’re traveling a good distance to purchase and don’t have a chance to integrate into the herd beforehand to see dynamics

Post # 97
Member
1798 posts
Buzzing bee

JsDragonfly:  I will always side with the animals because they’re always the innocent victims. I will judge whomever I want- just like you’re judging me, pot meet kettle, hello! *waves*

FutureMrsPlasters:  

 

Post # 98
Member
2554 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2009

yupmarried:  Holy heck dude.  How in the world was I judging?  I was merely asking you to take a step back and look at things from a different perspective.  Besides, we’re on the same side here.  I am all for doing everything you possibly can to avoid rehoming an animal, BUT if the quality of life (and I’m not talking about an occasional sneeze or wheeze…I’m talking legit having seriously difficulties breathing) other options need to be explored.  Because at the end of the day, if someone’s health is seriously affected by an animal, do you really think it’s best for the animal???  They’re not going to be getting the attention, exercise, love, affection, etc that they need because their owner CAN NOT take care of them!  Thank goodness that’s not my dad’s situation right now, but it could be someone else’s.  In always siding with the animals, like you said, sometimes you have to ask what is really best for them.  Staying in a home not getting the proper care that they need?  Or rehommed to someone who is going to give them everything they need?  Sometimes the answer isn’t the easiest one, as this thread has proved.

Post # 99
Member
1773 posts
Buzzing bee

FutureMrsPlasters:  Ha, thanks for telling me about my asthma. It isnt controlled, actually. But thanks! You do win in yours being worse. Congrats. Regardless I still wouldn’t send my baby off to die alone. Fuck that. That’s the point. I said I would be homeless before giving up my pets. If it’s a younger animal or something I can be more understanding. An old (very old!!) dog who will probably die of heartbreak? Yeah no.

Post # 100
Member
854 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

Rappig:  This isn’t a competition, I just think that we need to recognize that sometimes allergies can absolutely mean that a pet has to be re-homed. I haven’t asked my husband to do it (I’ve actually been pushing for a move for the dogs to our 1100 sq ft heated and cooled shop instead, because that would get the dander out of the house completely). What is the other option? I move out? I’m not the only one facing this truly life threatening issue.  The treatments can be very hard on your body and if there are any other underlying health issues like high blood pressure or heart issues then many can’t be used.

 I’m sorry you also suffer from asthma, it definitely sucks. There are all kinds of new treatments for allergic asthma now that I had no idea about before all of this. For the longest time I was relying on Claritin, Benadryl and arbuteral but that clearly didn’t cut it anymore. If your asthma isn’t controlled, the allergist could talk to you about allergy shots as well as other inhalers like spireva or breo or even explore Xolair. If your asthma isn’t so bad you are needing epi-pens , I’m happy for you and I hope just a new treatment protocol could help you like asthma free. 

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