(Closed) Reverse discrimination – does it bother you?

posted 7 years ago in Legal
  • poll: Is reverse discrimination wrong
    No - you have NO idea what it is to be in their shoes and need to ignore it : (14 votes)
    8 %
    Yes - discrimination and intolerance goes both ways : (139 votes)
    80 %
    Depends on the situation : (16 votes)
    9 %
    Other : (4 votes)
    2 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    5148 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: June 2011

    Discrimination is discrimination, no “reverse” about it in my opinion.

    Special treatment because of being a certain race, gender, etc., is also discriminatin in my opinion.

     

    I don’t want to get into a political debate, so please no one take it as such, but this is one of the best examples that comes to mind.

    • Group A did not vote for Obama because of his race.

    • Group B did vote for Obama because of his race.

    In my opinion, both are equally “racist”. Different treatment, whether good or bad, is still wrong. Equality is right.

    Post # 4
    Member
    4824 posts
    Honey bee

    @abbyful: This. I couldnt say it better myself.

    You judge people on their merits.

    You act and behave and make decisions based on being moral and honest.

    Post # 5
    Member
    4755 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: May 2012

    I think it makes perfect sense. Discrimination in the workplace. Something I work for. It promotes women in management. It promotes disabled people in the workplace. People in minority groups do and IMO SHOULD get special treatment.

    The tricky part is determining the “how” or “what is special treatment” and who is entitled to it. That I cannot answer.

    Post # 6
    Member
    4824 posts
    Honey bee

    @vmec: I think the only special treatment they should get is to allow them to operate on the same level.

    If you are in a wheelchair, you are entitled to a ramp, or lower sinks etc. You are not entitled to a manger position.

    I do think that a new hire or promotion needs to have definative proof that the experience, interview, credentials are superior just so there is no preferential treatment.

    Post # 8
    Member
    1077 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: April 2011

    @unixfairy:  There is no forward or reverse.  Picking on someone for things that they can’t change is just simply discrimination.  

    Being vegan doesn’t discriminate against meat eaters any more than being a meat eater discriminates against vegans.  They’re just different choices.  That particular case, unlike some of the others that we’re sort of stuck with, is ideologic so there is at least room to talk about why one choice might be better or worse.

    I read that it’s lame to be skinny on this site ALL the time.  I probably notice it more than the opposite situation because it’s the way that makes me feel targeted.  I also think that weight is something that one has a certain amount of control over athough our overall look is something that we’re stuck with.  It’s fine to talk about what is our idea of healthy.  But just saying that someone is too thin or heavy to look good is mean.  Today someone said something about stick bug models right after I put up a pic in the us vs. model thread. I was at least as skinny as my dress’ model, and it did make me feel bad.  Not that bad, but still. We’re going to be drawn to a certain set of aesthetics by nature so a certain amount of discrimination in our minds is inevitable, but we don’t have to act on it in an ugly way.

    When it comes to race or sexual orientation we are who we are.  Picking on one group and saying that it’s better or worse is always off-limits regardless of which group takes more knocks on average.

    Post # 10
    Member
    1077 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: April 2011

    @unixfairy: ^^^ Thank you.  ๐Ÿ™‚

    I don’t know if dogmatic = discriminatory, but it certainly can make one an annoying pain in the butt!

    Post # 11
    Member
    5148 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: June 2011

    “People in minority groups do and IMO SHOULD get special treatment.”

    Can you elaborate as to the “why”? Why should someone’s skin color, gender, disability, etc. entitle them to special treatment above others?

     

    I’m a female in a male-dominated field (I’m a computer programmer), if I want to be “equal”, I don’t see why I should get a promotion over a man is he is more deserving, I think the promotion should go to who deserves it more based on performance.

    And I don’t think someone that is a minority should get a promotion over someone that is white if the white person is more deserving; and likewise the white person shouldn’t get the promotion it if the minority person is more deserving.

    The same for disability, sexual orientation, etc.

    Post # 13
    Member
    4755 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: May 2012

    @unixfairy: That’s the thing, you were already qualified but if it hadn’t been for this ivisble “quota” that they had to fill you would have been looked over merely because you are a woman. Is that fair?

    Also I would argue, if you are that offended and or humiliated, you should have mentioned that to the interviewer and refused the job based on those grounds. Because to me it sounds like they can’t win. Damned if they hire you (qualified) and damned if they don’t (because they rather have a man). No offense meant… I’m glad you’ve bug yourself out of whatever hole you started in.

    Now I’m NOT saying someone UNqualitified should get a job JUST because he’s now white, and not a man. I’m saying IF they are qualified, and of a minority group they *should be* hired as opposed to the white guy.

    Post # 14
    Member
    1077 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: April 2011

    @abbyful:  How much extra crap do you have to deal with b/c you are a woman?  If you feel like you don’t lack the networking in-roads, mentorship, etc. that the guys have, then you should never get special consideration beyond your output, IMO.  But if you have to do a lot more just to maintain the same job, then ALL of your extra burden should be considered when evaluating the whole of your work compared to the work of one of your male colleagues.

    @unixfairy:  re: your post about feeling like you had to live down the stigma of affirmative action hiring, I’ve seen both sides of this.  I have a good AA friend who has an MBA from Wharton and a JD from Columbia and he felt the exact same way…that no one ever believed that he was there just because he was a pure-and-simple hot shot.  But I also have had the experience of going to the top school in the country in my field and having had a classmate be their first AA student EVER (w/ zero AA faculty).  Every year after he came and started actively recruiting, more AA students started choosing our school.  Community matters, and if it’s missing it’s harder to feel like you belong.  At the school where I teach, I often have only one AA student in my classes of 30.  It’s easy to say that she/he shouldn’t feel like a party of one, but when the other racial groups of students clique up, I know that these students are not having the same access to a learning community.  Some have the disposition to always find inclusion, but I come from too privileged of a place to say that others would be “wrong” to feel isolated and have a greater academic burden as a result.  

    On a personal note, as a woman in a male dominated field, I hated that there were no women faculty in my area in grad school and that the men were pretty lewd with me.  I had no recourse.  I think it made it harder for me to be there, and I don’t feel like I have the same kind of network with those guys as my male counterparts as a result of the harassment.

    Post # 15
    Member
    4755 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: May 2012

    @abbyful: I’ve already addressed your second point in my last post above.

    I will answer the WHY. Do not forget, this is my opinion. I believe that in the instance of how deeply ingrained this discrimination is often times you (not YOU, just ‘you’) don’t realize you’re doing it. Interviewers, and recruiters do not THINK they are discriminating, they just are it’s so deeply and widely accepted that men are ‘better’ at management and decision making therefore men will 8 out of 10 times (making this number up but the idea is true) the man is choosen over the woman. Unless there is some policy or quota in place I do not think there will ever be equality no matter how much any woman tries to ‘prove’ themselves.

    Yes, AN individual woman may get promoted here and there but the number will most likely *always* be skewed towards men holding significantly more management positions.

    Post # 16
    Member
    5148 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: June 2011

    @Melini – At my current job, I don’t have to deal with any extra crap. I’m in a pretty small department, and there are 4 men and 2 women (I was the first woman in the department). It’s a great work environment. It also probably helps that I work in a hospital, where overall there is a female-dominated workforce because most of the nurses are female.

    I worked tech support in college, there I did face some discrimination. Not from my co-workers, but from people calling in. They’d hear a female voice on the phone and immediately ask to be transferred to a man.

    Overall, I’ve never noticed discrimination from my peers in a professional setting, whether it be in college, at work, at various tech conferences, etc. There were a few times in college I got into a group of people I didn’t know for a project and they had the mindset “girls can’t program”, but I straightened them out! ๐Ÿ™‚

    The topic ‘Reverse discrimination – does it bother you?’ is closed to new replies.

    Find Amazing Vendors