(Closed) Reverse discrimination – does it bother you?

posted 9 years ago in Legal
  • poll: Is reverse discrimination wrong
    No - you have NO idea what it is to be in their shoes and need to ignore it : (14 votes)
    8 %
    Yes - discrimination and intolerance goes both ways : (139 votes)
    80 %
    Depends on the situation : (16 votes)
    9 %
    Other : (4 votes)
    2 %
  • Post # 122
    Member
    7081 posts
    Busy Beekeeper
    • Wedding: July 2009

    @Mrs.KMM:  I see my membership in certain organizations as a source of pride and ethnic identity.  Should I deny my Italian-ness?  Our families did that back in the 50’s, changing their last names to more “white” ones and refusing to pass on our native languages.  I feel that my life would be so enriched if I had a better understanding of my heritage. 

    I don’t think we can all just deny who we are and not celebrate our cultural differences… That includes black, Latino, different European cultures and what have you.  There are scholarships for people of every culture, Eurppean or otherwise.  Do you think we should do away with all of those?

    I just googled the Scandanavian American scholarships and this is what I came up with: http://www.amscan.org/alternate.html

    Anyway, I think Aubergold and Heather make some excellent points, and I encourage everyone to take the Implicit Associations Test to understand their own biases better (age, gender, race etc) https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/demo/

    Post # 123
    Member
    5667 posts
    Bee Keeper

    @hilsy85: I didn’t say “don’t do anything, it will go away.” Please do not put words in my mouth/post. I stated that it’s not about women or blacks or purple people eaters. It’s about people. If we take action in our daily lives and hire and treat equally eventually the midset will essentially die out. WE are the future of corporate America- hell, America in general! We have the power to make things right.

    Post # 124
    Member
    7081 posts
    Busy Beekeeper
    • Wedding: July 2009

    @Aure:  It would be a lot easier if it was just about class.  But unfortunately, you can take me out of the trailer park, put me in a school uniform and I look just like the rich white kids in my class. (Personal experience).  No one needs to know I’m dirt poor and it’s hard to discriminate against what you can’t see.

    But my future adopted child (who will be black), will have to face the fact that she will be seen as different and may be treated differently just by walking in the classroom.  (Studies say she’ll be called on less, less likely to be perceived as intelligent, and more likely to get in trouble for “acting out”– just because of her skin color). I’m going to have to teach her to be fiercely proud of how she looks, because the dominant society isn’t going to do that for her.  So yeah, it’s not just class… It’s race too…

    Post # 125
    Member
    3563 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: August 2010

    @Aure: I agree, that would be great in an ideal world. But unfortunately, that’s not our current world. And I feel that waiting around for that world to happen is only going to make the current situation more unequal for many people. And so I feel that something does need to be done about racism, sexism, etc. And that means recognizing the inequalities that pervade daily life for many people. I apologize if you feel that I put words in your mouth; I thought that you were in agreement with the perspective of “racism/sexism will go away on their own in time”. 

    Post # 126
    Member
    3563 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: August 2010

    @Mrs. DG: Yup! Especially because there is a correlation between race and class. Black people are more likely to fall into lower SESs than Whites. 

    Post # 127
    Member
    13095 posts
    Honey Beekeeper
    • Wedding: July 2010

    @hilsy85: and @Aubergold: Fine – I’ll take it to women vs. men but my same thoughts still apply.  I would never want to be awarded higher wages, a promotion or a corner office because I am a woman.  I don’t want someone to give me an advantage because I am a woman.

    Women have been majorly discriminated against in the past (and still are to some extents today) yet I want no special advantages because of this.

    As you said, women still make less than average than men.  They hold fewer “high up” positions within companies.  But creating special tracks, programs or quotas doesn’t correct that.  Time corrects that.  Women over time prove themselves to be just as capable as men in their positions.

    But if they only earn that by being given advantages, no one will actually believe that they could earn it of their own merit and they will therefore still be discriminated against.

    Post # 128
    Member
    5667 posts
    Bee Keeper

    @hilsy85: I agree with PPs that AA is not the answer. Managers will not treat people any better because they were forced to hire them to meet a quota.

     

    @Mrs. DG: I went to both public and private school and have lived in NY, GA and NV. I have not seen anyone discriminated against for their colour. In fact, the kids that I do know that were minorities were on par with the white students. They went to prestigious schools like West Point, Brown and Duke. The white kids who didn’t work hard? They didn’t. Perhaps I was just lucky to grow up in a way where everyone is valued on their merits rather than their skin tone. Regardless, your daughter would be treated no differently by me than a child of any other skin tone and that is a fact.

    Post # 130
    Member
    1303 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: April 2012

    @Mrs.KMM: Time will correct that, really? Time with no action corrects that?  Honestly, i dont have time to wait for “time”.  Especially since “time” is subjective (largely controlled by groups in power).  If we had waited for the ‘time” when men told us it was okay to vote and stop wearing pantyhose, I wouldn’t be where I am now, bare legs and all.  No Thank You.  Women over time didn’t prove themselves to be anything, they fought for equality knowing what their worth was IN THE MOMENT, not over time.  Same for other groups.  People have died to mitigate racism and discrimination; that’s what it took. It doesn’t take time.  It takes ACTION.

    Ugh, did I just come back to this thread?!!  I suck at life.  Nevermind!!

     

    Post # 131
    Member
    7081 posts
    Busy Beekeeper
    • Wedding: July 2009

    @Aure:  I sincerely believe you about treatment of my daughter 🙂 and I’m really glad you grew up in places where racism wasn’t evident…

    It’s unfortunate that the statistics aren’t in line with your experiences, because if they were, we wouldn’t have this issue!

    Post # 132
    Member
    1963 posts
    Buzzing bee

    @Aure: Um, why do poor people get special treatment.  Not being funny.  Just wondering.  If I follow some of these args out, the only people that should be getting any assistance are the mentally disabled, severe physically disabled, and children (poor preferable).

    Post # 133
    Member
    5667 posts
    Bee Keeper

    @heather25: I don’t believe in blanket aid. I do however believe in a combination of merit and need based aid. I feel that that discussion is for a different thread, however.

    Post # 134
    Member
    339 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: July 2009

    @Aure: Unfortunately, not everyone will treat Mrs. DG’s daughter the same, and that is a fact.

    Post # 135
    Member
    5667 posts
    Bee Keeper

    @Mrs. DG: If we, this generation, worked on creating that for our children it could be a reality.

    Post # 136
    Member
    1623 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: October 2012

    @heather25: Yes they were private and I guess that does make a difference. Thank you.

     

    @hilsy85: Thank you.

     

    I know I said I’d leave but I have one more thing. It isn’t just private groups. When I was 16 my older brother was diagnosed with a brain tumor. Being poor, he applied for OHP (state run health care). He was denied. If you are over the age of 19 there are 3 main reasons you are denied for OHP:

    • Not being diabled: Ok I get this. Disabled people deserve healthcare more than healthy people.
    • Not being pregnant: If it came between a pregnant woman and a healthy woman getting healthcare I would pick the pregnant woman too.
    • Not being a member of the hispanic minority group.

    The last reason is the one that gets me. I in no way think hispanic people don’t deserve healthcare from the state if they are low-income, but does a healthy hispanic person deserve it more than a white person with cancer? On most state assistance forms I have seen here (don’t know about elsewhere) there are two options under race and they make you check one: hispanic and not hispanic. Now I’m not saying he was denied because he was white because there were two other categories he didn’t fit into: he wasn’t disabled (even with a brain tumor) and he wasn’t pregnant. However, a hispanic person would have gotten approved even if they were also not disable and not pregnant.

    8 months later, he got health care. We went to our congressman and he pushed for it to be approved. He did end up passing, but the tumor was in a very bad place. But there were 8 months where he could have had pain killers or something that he didn’t have.

    I’m sorry I am so bitter towards all of this, I’ve just had a couple very bad eperiences with it all.

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